Tsrromi100
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If you have average A-Levels due to serious mitigating circumstances but had a decent/high 2:1 or even a first + good LLM. Would you have a chance at getting called to a London Chamber?

How about the same but for a magic circle or US firm? Surely this route is much easier (by no means an easy task)?

I've tried to find statistics of people from RG's and them getting into London chambers.
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Tsrromi100
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Crazy Jamie

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Crazy Jamie
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I think I answered this more or less in this thread. Taking the advice in that thread as read, if by a "London Chambers" (Chambers is the singular as well as the plural) you mean any set in London, then you would stand a chance, because there are a lot of sets in London with a wide variety of practice areas and prestige/reputation/standing. If you mean the top end of the London Bar, you will certainly find that to be more difficult, not necessarily due to the mitigating circumstances issue, but more because of the incredible level of competition for places at those sets. Something which others mention more than me, but which is relevant to this question, is to look at the profiles of recent tenants at the sets that you're considering. As candidates they are incredibly impressive, usually with extensive excellent work experience and other achievement on top of excellent academics. I should say that you can be a very successful barrister without practising at those sets (they really do represent only a tiny percentage of the Bar) but if you do want to aim for one of them, you have to critically assess your own application and position to determine whether or not it's a realistic ambition. It often isn't even for those who others could realistically obtain pupillage elsewhere.
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Johnny ~
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(Original post by Tsrromi100)
If you have average A-Levels due to serious mitigating circumstances but had a decent/high 2:1 or even a first + good LLM. Would you have a chance at getting called to a London Chamber?

How about the same but for a magic circle or US firm? Surely this route is much easier (by no means an easy task)?

I've tried to find statistics of people from RG's and them getting into London chambers.
You probably wouldn't need an LLM to get into an MC firm from Leeds. There are plenty of MC trainees with 2.1s and Firsts. I'm sure that you can check Linkedin for some anecdotes.

A-levels are generally not a problem if you have serious extenuating circumstances (not "I stubbed my toe two days before an exam") and if your university grades show a rebound.

US firms are a different story and a lot more difficult to generalise. You get snobby firms that ideally want Oxbridge Firsts and chill firms that want people with experience and a 2.1. However, as a whole, they are a lot more grades oriented and - whether consciously or as a byproduct of just how few TCs they give out - often end up recruiting students from a smaller selection of universities. That, however, comes down to other reasons. For example, these unis may recruit the strongest candidates to begin with, give out a large % of Firsts, or have the most engagement/sponsorship with these law firms. A mini-project for you might be to try to figure out which US law firms tend to give lots of TCs to Leeds students, or students at universities similar to Leeds. A lot of my friends are at US law firms and the variations in university 'representation' are staggering. For example, it's the norm for Davis Polk to have an Oxbridge only or Oxbridge + top London only intake. But it's also the norm for White & Case to have a very diverse intake.
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Tsrromi100
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(Original post by Crazy Jamie)
I think I answered this more or less in this thread. Taking the advice in that thread as read, if by a "London Chambers" (Chambers is the singular as well as the plural) you mean any set in London, then you would stand a chance, because there are a lot of sets in London with a wide variety of practice areas and prestige/reputation/standing. If you mean the top end of the London Bar, you will certainly find that to be more difficult, not necessarily due to the mitigating circumstances issue, but more because of the incredible level of competition for places at those sets. Something which others mention more than me, but which is relevant to this question, is to look at the profiles of recent tenants at the sets that you're considering. As candidates they are incredibly impressive, usually with extensive excellent work experience and other achievement on top of excellent academics. I should say that you can be a very successful barrister without practising at those sets (they really do represent only a tiny percentage of the Bar) but if you do want to aim for one of them, you have to critically assess your own application and position to determine whether or not it's a realistic ambition. It often isn't even for those who others could realistically obtain pupillage elsewhere.
Thank you as always Jamie.
My aim is either to go to Leeds this year and then do postgrad at Oxbridge, or either re apply next year to Oxbridge/LSE/UCL/KCL and Durham which I am sure would make it easier. I want to aim for a first at LLB level and do postgrad either way.

But unfortunately I have had severely disrupting factors during my secondary school education which have affected my GCSEs and A Levels.
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Tsrromi100
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(Original post by Johnny ~)
You probably wouldn't need an LLM to get into an MC firm from Leeds. There are plenty of MC trainees with 2.1s and Firsts. I'm sure that you can check Linkedin for some anecdotes.

A-levels are generally not a problem if you have serious extenuating circumstances (not "I stubbed my toe two days before an exam") and if your university grades show a rebound.

US firms are a different story and a lot more difficult to generalise. You get snobby firms that ideally want Oxbridge Firsts and chill firms that want people with experience and a 2.1. However, as a whole, they are a lot more grades oriented and - whether consciously or as a byproduct of just how few TCs they give out - often end up recruiting students from a smaller selection of universities. That, however, comes down to other reasons. For example, these unis may recruit the strongest candidates to begin with, give out a large % of Firsts, or have the most engagement/sponsorship with these law firms. A mini-project for you might be to try to figure out which US law firms tend to give lots of TCs to Leeds students, or students at universities similar to Leeds. A lot of my friends are at US law firms and the variations in university 'representation' are staggering. For example, it's the norm for Davis Polk to have an Oxbridge only or Oxbridge + top London only intake. But it's also the norm for White & Case to have a very diverse intake.
Thank you for this!
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Crazy Jamie
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(Original post by Tsrromi100)
Thank you as always Jamie.
My aim is either to go to Leeds this year and then do postgrad at Oxbridge, or either re apply next year to Oxbridge/LSE/UCL/KCL and Durham which I am sure would make it easier. I want to aim for a first at LLB level and do postgrad either way.

But unfortunately I have had severely disrupting factors during my secondary school education which have affected my GCSEs and A Levels.
The general wisdom is that a postgraduate degree doesn't help a great deal with pupillage applications, and that is usually true, but the point I make time and time again is that it is down to the individual to develop their own skills, experience, qualifications and, ultimately, application. If there's a particular reason why an LLM makes sense for an individual then it can be justified even if they usually don't add much. You'll know from previous posts that even with mitigating circumstances it is now on you to demonstrate your true academic level. A First at undergrad will help a great deal with that, but I don't see the harm in reinforcing it with an LLM in this particular situation. So it sounds like a fair plan to me.
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Johnny ~
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(Original post by Tsrromi100)
Thank you for this!
No problem! It may help if you pinpoint exactly which firms and chambers you want to apply to and whether it's worth taking a year out to reapply to better unis and/or sit A-levels in a real exam hall. I wouldn't waste a year if I was only applying to MC firms, but it might be worth it if you're thinking of applying to top sets that predominantly hire Oxbridge graduates.

Also keep in mind that getting into a top master's is not necessarily straightforward. You will need to perform consistently well in your three years (first and second year to achieve the grades to get the offer, third year to meet the offer requirements), and that's not something anyone can guarantee. The one thing that took me by surprise at my uni was how formerly top students with straight A*s and 42s in the IB ended up with low and mid 2:1s, while students who scraped in with A*AA and 38s ended up getting strong Firsts. It's pretty difficult to predict just how well you will do in a law exam.
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one_two_three
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Studying Law at university isn't the same as A level - it's not just about the time you put into studying, it's about studying smart. Good grades also isn't just memorising information, you have to be able to apply that information and form a solid argument while also considering opposing arguments and knowing enough to undermine these. You could have a great memory but if you cannot debate (on any topic) then you would struggle with a degree in Law, and also a career in law. I am saying this as you seem very determined so knowing that information as you go in will help you consistently achieve in your subjects if you apply it.

To get into Oxbridge LLM then you need a 1st at undergrad. To get into any law firm or chambers you need extra-curriculars and experience. It is obviously not an impossible mix and people manage it well but those that do understand themselves well and how they learn to maximise their time and still enjoy uni. Your extra-curriculars is where you enjoy your time at university, you get leadership and teamwork skills and you answer quite a few application questions from the experiences.
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