YGSK
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Hi guys, I am a grade 9 french student. I love french, and wanted to know what ur was like at a level. Please can I have an insight from fellow a level french students
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Kerzen
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(Original post by YGSK)
Hi guys, I am a grade 9 french student. I love french, and wanted to know what ur was like at a level. Please can I have an insight from fellow a level french students
I did A Level French and enjoyed it tremendously.

By the way, which board sets your GCSE?
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tinygirl96
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go for it
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redmeercat
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I loved A level French, and it's definitely a subject where hard work pays off! You have a nice balance of literature and language, and you can revise in so many different ways! The only disadvantage is that learning vocab can get old, but honestly, as long as you do it regularly, you never have to learn too much at once!
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mkim123
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French A Level is great if you really love the culture... I got a 9 at GCSE and thought it would be similar, therefore a level would be a breeze. I was very wrong. A level French is nothing like GCSE. It's much more discussion and factual information (i do AQA, it depends). If you love France and French culture go for it!
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YGSK
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It would be my 5th a level so I’m a bit nervous taking it. I’m doing maths, further maths, physics and chemistry, but I absolutely love french. Is it a huge amount of content? Like I’m good at keeping up with vocab in gcse and if I’m being honest the french reading tests are not that difficult at gcse. Are they a lot harder at a level? Btw I’m doing AQA GCSE and A level
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mkim123
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(Original post by YGSK)
It would be my 5th a level so I’m a bit nervous taking it. I’m doing maths, further maths, physics and chemistry, but I absolutely love french. Is it a huge amount of content? Like I’m good at keeping up with vocab in gcse and if I’m being honest the french reading tests are not that difficult at gcse. Are they a lot harder at a level? Btw I’m doing AQA GCSE and A level
Wow! That's impressive, i couldn't imagine doing 5, I'm barely managing with 3 lol!! Like I said before, you really have to love the subject, it's so much easier to retain information that way, and you have to be genuinely interested, keeping up with news, reading etc. The reading and listening aren't that different just harder vocab and longer texts, obviously.
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Xiphos
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(Original post by YGSK)
Hi guys, I am a grade 9 french student. I love french, and wanted to know what ur was like at a level. Please can I have an insight from fellow a level french students
If you don't want to do a degree that requires A-level french then, my advice would be to do something more useful. I made the mistake of choosing A-levels without a degree in mind. Figure out what you want to do at uni and then pick the A-levels that would be most relevant to that course. Good luck.
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chloenix
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(Original post by YGSK)
It would be my 5th a level so I’m a bit nervous taking it. I’m doing maths, further maths, physics and chemistry, but I absolutely love french. Is it a huge amount of content? Like I’m good at keeping up with vocab in gcse and if I’m being honest the french reading tests are not that difficult at gcse. Are they a lot harder at a level? Btw I’m doing AQA GCSE and A level
Personally, I would not recommend taking 5 A Levels at all! I think 4 is the limit; French A Level requires A LOT of work and the workload is very constant and quite independent (you'll be expected to practice your skills constantly outside of studying).
I myself don't think it's possible, people definitely underestimate the workload of A Level, and that's when they're only taking 4 subjects. It would be a better idea to drop one other subject and take French instead, or not take French at all (but it seems like you do love it). You can still learn French in your spare time if you want to, but I think you'll burn yourself out.
-(I study 4 A Levels including French so this is just my experience, of course if you really feel determined then it's up to you )
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YGSK
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Thank you guys ! I don’t think I’ll take it, as my school offers a french speaking diploma instead.
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Kerzen
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(Original post by YGSK)
It would be my 5th a level so I’m a bit nervous taking it. I’m doing maths, further maths, physics and chemistry, but I absolutely love french. Is it a huge amount of content? Like I’m good at keeping up with vocab in gcse and if I’m being honest the french reading tests are not that difficult at gcse. Are they a lot harder at a level? Btw I’m doing AQA GCSE and A level
Gosh, I really wouldn't take 5.

This is the format of the French A Level:

https://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resourc...52-SP-2016.PDF

I think that it would be better for you to get something like a magazine especially written for students taking French instead. That way, you can dip in and out of it when you have time.

https://maryglasgowplus.com/

Which subject are you hoping to read at University?
Last edited by Kerzen; 6 months ago
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carrots_blythe
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(Original post by mkim123)
French A Level is great if you really love the culture... I got a 9 at GCSE and thought it would be similar, therefore a level would be a breeze. I was very wrong. A level French is nothing like GCSE. It's much more discussion and factual information (i do AQA, it depends). If you love France and French culture go for it!
Hi thank you this is really helpful! I was wondering, when you say we would learn about French culture, what did you mean by this like could you plz give an example of a topic? Thanks
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mkim123
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(Original post by carrots_blythe)
Hi thank you this is really helpful! I was wondering, when you say we would learn about French culture, what did you mean by this like could you plz give an example of a topic? Thanks
Of course! Topics such as French music, French films, criminality in France, French food and the history of gastronomy in France + more. If you want to know specifically visit the Aqa / Edexcel website for the specification.
I do AQA so I'll put the link here: https://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/lang...ubject-content
Feel free to ask anything else, I'm happy to help
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carrots_blythe
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(Original post by mkim123)
Of course! Topics such as French music, French films, criminality in France, French food and the history of gastronomy in France + more. If you want to know specifically visit the Aqa / Edexcel website for the specification.
I do AQA so I'll put the link here: https://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/lang...ubject-content
Feel free to ask anything else, I'm happy to help
Thanks so much I appreciate it! If you're not hugely interested in french culture but just have a love for the actual language and want to be fluent, would you suggest not doing the A level and learning it on the side instead?
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mkim123
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(Original post by carrots_blythe)
Thanks so much I appreciate it! If you're not hugely interested in french culture but just have a love for the actual language and want to be fluent, would you suggest not doing the A level and learning it on the side instead?
Personally, I think it would be quite difficult to have a conversation with a French person having not learnt about the culture. Learning the language whilst learning the culture makes it much more enjoyable and you get to expand your range of vocabulary. Ultimately, it's your choice though.
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emansabir
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(Original post by YGSK)
It would be my 5th a level so I’m a bit nervous taking it. I’m doing maths, further maths, physics and chemistry, but I absolutely love french. Is it a huge amount of content? Like I’m good at keeping up with vocab in gcse and if I’m being honest the french reading tests are not that difficult at gcse. Are they a lot harder at a level? Btw I’m doing AQA GCSE and A level
I do french A-level and it is a lot of content to revise. Don’t get me wrong i absolutely love it and think it’s a nice balance of language and literature but there is a lot to know so I wouldn’t recommend doing it as a 5th A-level. Maybe you could do the DELF instead if you’re interested in the language but don’t have the time for a full A-level?
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Filthy Communist
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I did A-level German for 2 months and ****ing hated it! But that doesn't mean you will too.

Firstly, your teachers may tell you "go on, do it, it'll be so easy for you!" Unless you're a literal prodigy, which you're not because otherwise you would have taken your GCSE early, it's not going to be easy. Not because the content itself is hard, it really isn't, but the amount of energy you'll have to expend is insane.

Don't think of it as a language. Think of it as a social study of France, with an intense workload in its own right, and it's all taught in French on top of that. It'll be a lot of work. Personally, I'm more of a STEM guy than a humanities guy, so I didn't really like this, and I was taking it as a 4th A-level to boot, meaning I didn't have enough downtime to recover. Sure, I was getting Bs in German at the start of year 12 because I'm naturally good at languages and we didn't have much in the way of essays back then, but because I had no energy left for my other subjects and no down time to recover that energy I was failing them all, so I had no choice but to drop it. If you're a work horse with a passion for not only the French language but France in general, you'll probably enjoy it.

EDIT: 5th A-level? ****ing 5th? Unless you're doing at least 20 GCSEs and managing fine, don't even think about it.
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sufys12
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(Original post by Filthy Communist)
I did A-level German for 2 months and ****ing hated it! But that doesn't mean you will too.

Firstly, your teachers may tell you "go on, do it, it'll be so easy for you!" Unless you're a literal prodigy, which you're not because otherwise you would have taken your GCSE early, it's not going to be easy. Not because the content itself is hard, it really isn't, but the amount of energy you'll have to expend is insane.

Don't think of it as a language. Think of it as a social study of France, with an intense workload in its own right, and it's all taught in French on top of that. It'll be a lot of work. Personally, I'm more of a STEM guy than a humanities guy, so I didn't really like this, and I was taking it as a 4th A-level to boot, meaning I didn't have enough downtime to recover. Sure, I was getting Bs in German at the start of year 12 because I'm naturally good at languages and we didn't have much in the way of essays back then, but because I had no energy left for my other subjects and no down time to recover that energy I was failing them all, so I had no choice but to drop it. If you're a work horse with a passion for not only the French language but France in general, you'll probably enjoy it.

EDIT: 5th A-level? ****ing 5th? Unless you're doing at least 20 GCSEs and managing fine, don't even think about it.
Luckily they aren't taking it. I would never take A-level French personally unless I was a native speaker.
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LucyDavidson
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if you like it then follow it. I enjoy learning foreign languages. but this now, before, it was hard for me, and I used this service: https://writemyessays.me/ it helped me to do the work that I myself could not do well. It was hard for me, but I did not give up, because this is my calling. And now everything is fine, I like to study.
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emansabir
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(Original post by sufys12)
Luckily they aren't taking it. I would never take A-level French personally unless I was a native speaker. Submit reply
you really don’t need to be a native speaker to take a language at A-level and excel at it. All you need is the time and willingness to learn bc yes it’s a lot harder than gcse but it’s also rewarding. I guess it depends how fast you pick languages up but I’m not a native speaker and I’m doing great at it so yeah you really don’t need to be a native speaker as long as you put in the work
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