Zayaanh123
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The question is: How does Stevenson present Hyde as a frightening outsider?

Throughout the novel, The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, Stevenson illustrates Hyde as a violent brute who does not comply with society's expectations. Stevenson uses Hyde's physical appearance and immoral behaviour to present Hyde as a frightening outsider. Stevenson uses biblical references to highlight Mr Hyde's evil and devilish actions and how he contradicts the traditional mores of Victorian society.

In Chapter 2, Stevenson focuses on the appearance of Hyde and the reaction of Utterson, who reacts to Mr Hyde with 'disgust, loathing and fear'. These negatives allow Stevenson to present Hyde as someone who causes even the most professional people extreme hatred such as Mr Utterson, someone who is typically considered to be composed. Stevenson uses the metaphor, 'Satan's signature upon a face'. This phrase links Hyde to Satan, the first-ever outsider. By having the devils signature upon his face, it suggests that Hyde has already sealed his fate as someone evil bound by malice and brutality. Furthermore, due to the religious Victorian audience, the reference to Satan would cause intense fear as they believed in heaven and hell. Hyde disregards all the rules not only of society but also religion, causing him to be a frightening outsider.

In the rest of the novel, Stevenson establishes Mr Hyde as a cruel and dangerous character who 'trampled calmly' over a small girl and left her 'screaming'. An immediate portrayal of Mr Hyde is made through this oxymoron and implies not only was Hyde able to ruthlessly crush the young girl, but to do so without any care, feeling no remorse for his actions. Stevenson uses the fact Hyde trampled on a defenceless child, considered to be innocent. This presents Hyde as the opposite of Victorian men, who were concerned with a reputation of generosity and morality which establishes him as the villain.

Stevenson then returns to Hyde's aggressive behaviour and actions and foreshadows that Hyde's actions will escalate. After the trampling of the girl, Stevenson reveals Hyde's anger as he violently murders Sir Danvers by 'clubbing him to the earth'. During the murder, Stevenson uses animalistic imagery to portray Hyde; he behaves with 'ape-like fury' and in his meeting with Utterson, he snarled aloud into a savage laugh'. Both the simile linking him to an ape and the verb 'snarled' portray his animalistic and violent behaviour. By describing him as an animal rather than a human, Stevenson evokes a sense of him being an outsider. His savage laugh separates him from society as a Victorian gentleman would welcome a guest not hiss and snarl at them. The fact Sir Danvers face was clubbed until it was incredibly 'mangled' illustrates Hyde as a primitive atavistic throwback, something which was a big topic due to Darwin published his Theory of Evolution.

In 1886, this ending would have provided tension and suspense. This may have caused shockwaves in the religious Victorian society as the reader would greatly disapprove of Hyde’s satanic character who is ‘like a madman’, evoking ideas of a crazed and frenzied creature. Therefore, it comes as no surprise that Hyde will continually be viewed as a frightening outsider, feared by readers.
Last edited by Zayaanh123; 4 months ago
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16rwalk
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(Original post by Zayaanh123)
The question is: How does Stevenson present Hyde as a frightening outsider?

Throughout the novel, The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, Stevenson illustrates Hyde as a violent brute who does not comply with society's expectations. Stevenson uses Hyde's physical appearance and immoral behaviour to present Hyde as a frightening outsider. Stevenson uses biblical references to highlight Mr Hyde's evil and devilish actions and how he contradicts the traditional mores of Victorian society.

In Chapter 2, Stevenson focuses on the appearance of Hyde and the reaction of Utterson, who reacts to Mr Hyde with 'disgust, loathing and fear'. These negatives allow Stevenson to present Hyde as someone who causes even the most professional people extreme hatred such as Mr Utterson, someone who is typically considered to be composed. Stevenson uses the metaphor, 'Satan's signature upon a face'. This phrase links Hyde to Satan, the first-ever outsider. By having the devils signature upon his face, it suggests that Hyde has already sealed his fate as someone evil bound by malice and brutality. Furthermore, due to the religious Victorian audience, the reference to Satan would cause intense fear as they believed in heaven and hell. Hyde disregards all the rules not only of society but also religion, causing him to be a frightening outsider.

In the rest of the novel, Stevenson establishes Mr Hyde as a cruel and dangerous character who 'trampled calmly' over a small girl and left her 'screaming'. An immediate portrayal of Mr Hyde is made through this oxymoron and implies not only was Hyde able to ruthlessly crush the young girl, but to do so without any care, feeling no remorse for his actions. Stevenson uses the fact Hyde trampled on a defenceless child, considered to be innocent. This presents Hyde as the opposite of Victorian men, who were concerned with a reputation of generosity and morality which establishes him as the villain.

Stevenson then returns to Hyde's aggressive behaviour and actions and foreshadows that Hyde's actions will escalate. After the trampling of the girl, Stevenson reveals Hyde's anger as he violently murders Sir Danvers by 'clubbing him to the earth'. During the murder, Stevenson uses animalistic imagery to portray Hyde; he behaves with 'ape-like fury' and in his meeting with Utterson, he snarled aloud into a savage laugh'. Both the simile linking him to an ape and the verb 'snarled' portray his animalistic and violent behaviour. By describing him as an animal rather than a human, Stevenson evokes a sense of him being an outsider. His savage laugh separates him from society as a Victorian gentleman would welcome a guest not hiss and snarl at them. The fact Sir Danvers face was clubbed until it was incredibly 'mangled' illustrates Hyde as a primitive atavistic throwback, something which was a big topic due to Darwin published his Theory of Evolution.

In 1886, this ending would have provided tension and suspense. This may have caused shockwaves in the religious Victorian society as the reader would greatly disapprove of Hyde’s satanic character who is ‘like a madman’, evoking ideas of a crazed and frenzied creature. Therefore, it comes as no surprise that Hyde will continually be viewed as a frightening outsider, feared by readers.
what grade did you get for that
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jamesg2
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Note the novella is not entitled “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.” It is entitled “Strange case of Dr Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.” The absence of the definitive article has importance for the theme of the novella.

You have made a reasonable attempt at the question and probably ought to pass. Below are some ideas for you to consider.

Although Jekyll originally lived in an expensive and plush house in a square on the outskirts of London Dr. Denman’s house and surgery - that Jekyll bought for himself and Hyde - was situated in Soho. That is a point you might want to develop. Why would Jekyll who lived well away from Soho, want to live in Soho?? And it was a deliberate act. Jekyll chose to move to Soho. A renowned doctor and surgeon leaves a plush conservative area in London to live in Soho. That tells you a lot about the real Dr. Jekyll.

You are right that some Victorian’s would have been shocked by Jekyll/Hydes’s behaviour, but not all. You mention that Hyde is an outsider. That is true. Hyde is the inside of Jekyll who is able to also be on the outside of Dr Jekyll.

Remember that the process was a pharmacological process. Dr. Lanyan describes the process as Hyde changes back to Jekyll and it is the only account of the process in the novella. The point to remember is that the book does not describe two people - it describes one person who can transform himself. Therefore what you ascribe to Hyde was actually carried out by Jekyll. Someone said that a better title - and a more accurate title - would have been the “Strange Case of Dr Jekyll Or Mr, Hyde.”
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Zayaanh123
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(Original post by 16rwalk)
what grade did you get for that
i got 21 out of 30

I dont know what grade that is though, but evreyone else in my class got roughly 10 to 15
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Zayaanh123
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(Original post by jamesg2)
Note the novella is not entitled “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.” It is entitled “Strange case of Dr Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.” The absence of the definitive article has importance for the theme of the novella.

You have made a reasonable attempt at the question and probably ought to pass. Below are some ideas for you to consider.

Although Jekyll originally lived in an expensive and plush house in a square on the outskirts of London Dr. Denman’s house and surgery - that Jekyll bought for himself and Hyde - was situated in Soho. That is a point you might want to develop. Why would Jekyll who lived well away from Soho, want to live in Soho?? And it was a deliberate act. Jekyll chose to move to Soho. A renowned doctor and surgeon leaves a plush conservative area in London to live in Soho. That tells you a lot about the real Dr. Jekyll.

You are right that some Victorian’s would have been shocked by Jekyll/Hydes’s behaviour, but not all. You mention that Hyde is an outsider. That is true. Hyde is the inside of Jekyll who is able to also be on the outside of Dr Jekyll.

Remember that the process was a pharmacological process. Dr. Lanyan describes the process as Hyde changes back to Jekyll and it is the only account of the process in the novella. The point to remember is that the book does not describe two people - it describes one person who can transform himself. Therefore what you ascribe to Hyde was actually carried out by Jekyll. Someone said that a better title - and a more accurate title - would have been the “Strange Case of Dr Jekyll Or Mr, Hyde.”
Thank you
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