oneirics
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Confused about a few things.
1. Are groups like the Women’s Union for National Suffrage 1897 and Women’s Social and Political Union 1903 considered pressure groups?
2. What is the difference between legislation and government policy?
3. Does pressure group membership always mean a member is paying to be apart/support the group?

appreciate any answers I know these are probably very rookie questions but I’ve only just started to decide and sit down to prepare for next year haha
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something_orphic
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1. Yes? This is something i have not exactly thought about tbh. I believe in the textbook (assuming we have the same one) it comes just before pressure groups but is separated out a bit from the pressure group sections as it has its own page and stuff. I dont think its too important to know and i wouldn't use them as examples of pressure groups in an exam question personally but its up to you.
2. legislation is just a law/set of laws. Government policy is a statement declaring a governments objective- normally in a manifesto. They are not committed to follow though with it and it can involve legislation in order to achieve the policy but not always.
3. No. For example, you can be a member of the make votes matter group without paying. Pressure groups may request donations from their members (this is very common) but there is definitely not always a membership fee.
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oneirics
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(Original post by something_orphic)
1. Yes? This is something i have not exactly thought about tbh. I believe in the textbook (assuming we have the same one) it comes just before pressure groups but is separated out a bit from the pressure group sections as it has its own page and stuff. I dont think its too important to know and i wouldn't use them as examples of pressure groups in an exam question personally but its up to you.
2. legislation is just a law/set of laws. Government policy is a statement declaring a governments objective- normally in a manifesto. They are not committed to follow though with it and it can involve legislation in order to achieve the policy but not always.
3. No. For example, you can be a member of the make votes matter group without paying. Pressure groups may request donations from their members (this is very common) but there is definitely not always a membership fee.
ah ok got it, thanks for the reply! super clear and helpful
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