SongBird2020
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 months ago
#1
Hi I'm in my 2nd year of Biomedical Science (BSc) and I have to read loads of scientific papers as part of my tutorials and assignments etc. The problem is that I find them really complicated and difficult to understand and I find it hard to pick things out.. Does anyone have any tips on how to get better at reading them because I feel really dumb compared to other people in my classes who seem to grasp the key concepts straight away.
0
reply
Junaki
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#2
Report 5 months ago
#2
Hi, 1st year Biomed student here. If the key concepts are what you're struggling with, I like to start with textbooks and make sure I understand the topic first. When I go to read research papers I like to focus on the abstract and discussion, to see if I like the paper, and then I'll continue to read the major contents.

Ofc when you're reading a paper and come across something you don't understand you can always open up another tab and read about that topic. I doubt any of us are expected to understand everything we read in the literature. I hope that helps. Good luck and stay well x
2
reply
SongBird2020
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 5 months ago
#3
(Original post by Junaki)
Hi, 1st year Biomed student here. If the key concepts are what you're struggling with, I like to start with textbooks and make sure I understand the topic first. When I go to read research papers I like to focus on the abstract and discussion, to see if I like the paper, and then I'll continue to read the major contents.

Ofc when you're reading a paper and come across something you don't understand you can always open up another tab and read about that topic. I doubt any of us are expected to understand everything we read in the literature. I hope that helps. Good luck and stay well x
Thanks a lot yeah I do open tabs and try to research things that i don't understand. I think it's mainly the results and methods sections of the papers that I struggle to get my head around.
0
reply
Junaki
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#4
Report 5 months ago
#4
(Original post by SongBird2020)
Thanks a lot yeah I do open tabs and try to research things that i don't understand. I think it's mainly the results and methods sections of the papers that I struggle to get my head around.
Tbf I agree. I've barely had any practicals this year, so when I read about the methods and the way they display the results it just looks like a big soup of numbers to me. :erm:
1
reply
QuentinM
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#5
Report 5 months ago
#5
(Original post by SongBird2020)
Hi I'm in my 2nd year of Biomedical Science (BSc) and I have to read loads of scientific papers as part of my tutorials and assignments etc. The problem is that I find them really complicated and difficult to understand and I find it hard to pick things out.. Does anyone have any tips on how to get better at reading them because I feel really dumb compared to other people in my classes who seem to grasp the key concepts straight away.
Hi, 1st year PhD student here. I've definitely been here before. My main advice is focus on the abstract and figures. The abstract is literally their brief summary of their work, the figures allow you to see how convincing their statements are with their graphs etc.

I wouldn't spend too much time focusing on methods during the first part of your undergrad degree-I'm a fiend for a good methods section, usually because I'm very familiar with a lot of techniques (either having done them or something similar) so it's interesting for me, but I doubt you will need to deep dive into methods too much unless you are starting critical analysis of certain research.

For figures, read the figure headings as they will summarise what has been found, though if you are still not as familiar with papers and techniques I'd focus mainly on the graphs and what the statistical differences they show/don't show look like.
3
reply
SongBird2020
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 5 months ago
#6
(Original post by QuentinM)
Hi, 1st year PhD student here. I've definitely been here before. My main advice is focus on the abstract and figures. The abstract is literally their brief summary of their work, the figures allow you to see how convincing their statements are with their graphs etc.

I wouldn't spend too much time focusing on methods during the first part of your undergrad degree-I'm a fiend for a good methods section, usually because I'm very familiar with a lot of techniques (either having done them or something similar) so it's interesting for me, but I doubt you will need to deep dive into methods too much unless you are starting critical analysis of certain research.

For figures, read the figure headings as they will summarise what has been found, though if you are still not as familiar with papers and techniques I'd focus mainly on the graphs and what the statistical differences they show/don't show look like.
Thanks a lot for that, I'm wondering if you could offer a bit of advice on one of my assignments. So I have to write a grant proposal where I have to ask a research question on any topic of my choice within Biomedical Science. Also, the question/experiement i have to design has to be something that has never been done before. It's hard to research this when I find that most experiments I'm interested in have already been done...So I really don't know where to start with i can't decide on a topic and it's extremely difficult when I have to read loads of research papers that I struggle to understand. Thanks
Last edited by SongBird2020; 5 months ago
0
reply
QuentinM
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#7
Report 5 months ago
#7
(Original post by SongBird2020)
Thanks a lot for that, I'm wondering if you could offer a bit of advice on one of my assignments. So I have to write a grant proposal where I have to ask a research question on any topic of my choice within Biomedical Science. Also, the question/experiement i have to design has to be something that has never been done before. It's hard to research this when I find that most experiments I'm interested in have already been done...So I really don't know where to start with i can't decide on a topic and it's extremely difficult when I have to read loads of research papers that I struggle to understand. Thanks
A good idea might be to read the discussion of a paper you like, as they almost always recommend experiments that are the natural follow on's for their published work.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Feeling behind at school/college? What is the best thing your teachers could to help you catch up?

Extra compulsory independent learning activities (eg, homework tasks) (2)
5.71%
Run extra compulsory lessons or workshops (7)
20%
Focus on making the normal lesson time with them as high quality as possible (4)
11.43%
Focus on making the normal learning resources as high quality/accessible as possible (3)
8.57%
Provide extra optional activities, lessons and/or workshops (11)
31.43%
Assess students, decide who needs extra support and focus on these students (8)
22.86%

Watched Threads

View All