im 14/15 and want to train weights, where do I start?

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x_anonymous_x
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(im a girl if that helps) im trying to gain weight and muscle, I need to gain more weight before I train weights, but when im ready where do I start? I know absolutey nothing... plus anything I can do/buy at home? since I can't go to gyms for probably a while.
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FourTin_Goon
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Hi, it's great that you want to get into weight-lifting. I would really recommend that you start with basic bodyweight exercises and learn from tutorials online. From there you can nail the form and get into a great daily routine that you can sustain. I would not rush into lifting weights until you know you have the form nailed down. Regrettably, when I first started lifting weights I didn't follow this kind of advice and I have quite a few muscle tears - recovering from injuries (even minor ones) can really halt your progress.

Compound exercises where you use multiple muscle groups will help to build a solid base for when you are ready to jump into weight training. Press-ups, chin-ups, dips, pull-ups, squats and lunges are great exercises where you can progress quite quickly if you stick to a routine.

Best of luck with it!
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x_anonymous_x
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Thank you so much, should I can buy to help? also i want to build muscles, but not like rock hard abs and huge biceps, I would like to be toned and more strong, is weight training good for that?
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PollyParrot23
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(Original post by x_anonymous_x)
Thank you so much, should I can buy to help? also i want to build muscles, but not like rock hard abs and huge biceps, I would like to be toned and more strong, is weight training good for that?
Hiya! Any exercise that makes your muscles work against resistance strengthens them so training with weights and against your own body weight are both good ways to build strength. Good beginner equipment could be dumbbells (you can get adjustable ones so you get a kit and can alter one dumbbell to be between 2 and 8kg for example), kettlebells and resistance bands but in some cases you could use 'makeshift' weights bc a lot of equipment is selling out fast due to lockdown (think using big bottles of water or rucksacks filled with heavy objects then padded out but be careful and just think sensibly if what you use is safe). The other thing I bought recently was £15 pull up bar from decathlon that just goes in my door frame with no screws and I got a big looped resistance band to do assisted pull ups.

With weight training the general principle is you overload the muscles a bit more each time, it creates microtears in the muscle which repair and get bigger. That 'progressive overload' as it's known is how you keep getting stronger. Generally that's done by making the weights heavier and heavier but obviously you don't have access to all that equipment yet, so your other option would be to increase the reps of an exercise (say you did 3 rounds of 10 of an exercise, then when that doesn't feel challenging increase it or 3 rounds of 11 or 12 and so on).

Good exercises you can do without a gym include:

Press Ups- or kneeling press ups. Pressups should be LOW, your chest should almost be on the floor and they're pretty difficult done correctly so a good way to build strength is by lowering your knees to floor. Still keep you core tight, body straight, head in line and don't sink into your shoulder blades

Tricep dips

Plank- as with press ups be really aware of keeping your core engaged and everything tight and straight. You can do variations with plank on your elbows, straight arm, side plank, commando plank, plank with shoulder taps or hip dips

Squat- another common one that's easy to get wrong.Start your squat hinging back at the hip like you're going to sit on a chair. Your thighs should be parallel to the ground at the bottom of you squat and back should stay straight. Don't let your feet or knees collapse inwards, your knees should trace a line over your feet. You can also do sumo squats (feet, legs and hips rotate outward), split squats, squat with dumbbell overhead press and kettlebell swings (you can use any weight for these it doesn't have to be kettlebells just make sure you have a good grip on whatever you use)

Deadlifts- you see people doing deadlifts with big weights but it's a really good idea to start out using light weights to get your form right because incorrect form here could be really damaging to your back as you progress to bigger weights.

Hip thrust/glute bridge- both these have similar movements, these are good for your glutes. Currently im using a rucksack with heavy things in for these

Knowing how many of each exercise to do does largely depend on your ability and whether you are using weights but an example of a beginners workout could be

3x10 squats
3x10 kneeling press ups
3x15 glute bridge
3x15 tricep dip
1 min plank
(repeat the whole thing 3 times over)

If you don't feel comfortable putting together routines yourself, YouTube has some great videos. Try searching things like 'Beginner strength workout at home' or 'strength workout no equipment'.

Best of luck!
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x_anonymous_x
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(Original post by PollyParrot23)
Hiya! Any exercise that makes your muscles work against resistance strengthens them so training with weights and against your own body weight are both good ways to build strength. Good beginner equipment could be dumbbells (you can get adjustable ones so you get a kit and can alter one dumbbell to be between 2 and 8kg for example), kettlebells and resistance bands but in some cases you could use 'makeshift' weights bc a lot of equipment is selling out fast due to lockdown (think using big bottles of water or rucksacks filled with heavy objects then padded out but be careful and just think sensibly if what you use is safe). The other thing I bought recently was £15 pull up bar from decathlon that just goes in my door frame with no screws and I got a big looped resistance band to do assisted pull ups.

With weight training the general principle is you overload the muscles a bit more each time, it creates microtears in the muscle which repair and get bigger. That 'progressive overload' as it's known is how you keep getting stronger. Generally that's done by making the weights heavier and heavier but obviously you don't have access to all that equipment yet, so your other option would be to increase the reps of an exercise (say you did 3 rounds of 10 of an exercise, then when that doesn't feel challenging increase it or 3 rounds of 11 or 12 and so on).

Good exercises you can do without a gym include:

Press Ups- or kneeling press ups. Pressups should be LOW, your chest should almost be on the floor and they're pretty difficult done correctly so a good way to build strength is by lowering your knees to floor. Still keep you core tight, body straight, head in line and don't sink into your shoulder blades

Tricep dips

Plank- as with press ups be really aware of keeping your core engaged and everything tight and straight. You can do variations with plank on your elbows, straight arm, side plank, commando plank, plank with shoulder taps or hip dips

Squat- another common one that's easy to get wrong.Start your squat hinging back at the hip like you're going to sit on a chair. Your thighs should be parallel to the ground at the bottom of you squat and back should stay straight. Don't let your feet or knees collapse inwards, your knees should trace a line over your feet. You can also do sumo squats (feet, legs and hips rotate outward), split squats, squat with dumbbell overhead press and kettlebell swings (you can use any weight for these it doesn't have to be kettlebells just make sure you have a good grip on whatever you use)

Deadlifts- you see people doing deadlifts with big weights but it's a really good idea to start out using light weights to get your form right because incorrect form here could be really damaging to your back as you progress to bigger weights.

Hip thrust/glute bridge- both these have similar movements, these are good for your glutes. Currently im using a rucksack with heavy things in for these

Knowing how many of each exercise to do does largely depend on your ability and whether you are using weights but an example of a beginners workout could be

3x10 squats
3x10 kneeling press ups
3x15 glute bridge
3x15 tricep dip
1 min plank
(repeat the whole thing 3 times over)

If you don't feel comfortable putting together routines yourself, YouTube has some great videos. Try searching things like 'Beginner strength workout at home' or 'strength workout no equipment'.

Best of luck!
Thank you so much! This was really helpful ty
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