Should the uni admissions system change?

Watch
Poll: Which proposed uni application process would you prefer?
Applying to uni after you get your results (PQA) (588)
52.55%
Applying to uni before exams but only receiving offers after your results (PQO) (111)
9.92%
Applying to uni before exams, interview before results, then receive offers after results (PQO - UCAS) (150)
13.4%
Applying to uni before exams with predicted grades (Current system) (256)
22.88%
Another option (tell us in the chat!) (14)
1.25%
nexttime
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#41
Report 2 weeks ago
#41
(Original post by hehe_x)
Some people also seem to think they've got an offer so they can take the foot of the pedal for the rest of the year. And then if you don't meet the offer on results day that's another story.
Or conversely, some people take the pressure off because they have unconditional offers! Something which the government has worked hard to heavily incentivise. Probably not a great educational strategy though.

Post-grade university admissions would remove all of that.
0
reply
hehe_x
Badges: 12
#42
Report 2 weeks ago
#42
(Original post by nexttime)
Or conversely, some people take the pressure off because they have unconditional offers! Something which the government has worked hard to heavily incentivise. Probably not a great educational strategy though.

Post-grade university admissions would remove all of that.
Or pressures them into accepting that unconditional offer because of its nature, which then leads to suboptimal performance in both year 13/university. But questionably, just because they've worked hard on it, does it mean its right? But yeah, I agree with you that it's not a good educational strategy. There are advantages/disadvantages to both sides of the coin I guess.
1
reply
TCL
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#43
Report 2 weeks ago
#43
Nobody has mentioned the Scottish system. Their university offers are usually based on their "Highers" taken in Y12 (well, sort of Y12 as they have a different year). The Y13 Advanced Highers are only needed by some courses. They also have a simpler choice of courses - if they don't want to pay, they can limit their search to Scotland.

I agree that, particularly in Covid times, it was a bad move to ditch AS levels.
0
reply
TCL
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#44
Report 2 weeks ago
#44
(Original post by Theloniouss)
Without some sort of study I couldn't tell you, but I'd say at least 6 months.
I agree that 6-9 months would give you enough time to learn skills for your own benefit and to contribute to the sponsoring organisation. The more skilled the placement, the longer it might need to be.
0
reply
ajj2000
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#45
Report 2 weeks ago
#45
(Original post by TCL)
I agree that 6-9 months would give you enough time to learn skills for your own benefit and to contribute to the sponsoring organisation. The more skilled the placement, the longer it might need to be.
That doesn't sound very different to taking a year out - which you could do at the moment and apply with achieved grades.
0
reply
Johnny ~
Badges: 15
#46
Report 2 weeks ago
#46
👏 Bring 👏 Back 👏 AS 👏 exams 👏

Mandatory gap years would suck and result in most students wasting a year at the peak of their lives.
0
reply
parmezanne
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#47
Report 1 week ago
#47
I just wish there wasn't a limit on how many places you could apply to, like in the US.
0
reply
nexttime
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#48
Report 1 week ago
#48
(Original post by parmezanne)
I just wish there wasn't a limit on how many places you could apply to, like in the US.
So that everywhere has like 100 applicants per place and its a complete lottery? :lolwut:
0
reply
mnot
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#49
Report 1 week ago
#49
(Original post by parmezanne)
I just wish there wasn't a limit on how many places you could apply to, like in the US.
I actually think this is a good thing for the most part.

You just have to do a little more research & selection before sending off applications but you can only enrol at one uni so would have to do this post-offers if you have more (granted 2020 & 2021 are not great years to compare with covid). and with UCAS extra and clearing/adjustment if things really do go down fast their is built in insurance.

But it means people end up having to prioritise their favourite choices, and the focus admissions wise can largely be on academic track records. Whereas the US where its not uncommon for the same people to apply to every Ivy league+lots of other elite schools and you end up with central admissions having to be picky over fairly unimportant things and ridiculously low acceptance rates.
1
reply
nexttime
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#50
Report 1 week ago
#50
(Original post by mnot)
I actually think this is a good thing for the most part.

You just have to do a little more research & selection before sending off applications but you can only enrol at one uni so would have to do this post-offers if you have more (granted 2020 & 2021 are not great years to compare with covid). and with UCAS extra and clearing/adjustment if things really do go down fast their is built in insurance.

But it means people end up having to prioritise their favourite choices, and the focus admissions wise can largely be on academic track records. Whereas the US where its not uncommon for the same people to apply to every Ivy league+lots of other elite schools and you end up with central admissions having to be picky over fairly unimportant things and ridiculously low acceptance rates.
I don't understand. What would be stopping someone applying to 50 unis?
0
reply
mnot
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#51
Report 1 week ago
#51
(Original post by nexttime)
I don't understand. What would be stopping someone applying to 50 unis?
I mean I think its a good thing that UCAS limits admissions to 5 unis.

In the US their isn’t anything stopping people from applying to 50 (unless they apply via early action, but that is more of an intricacy to the US system).
0
reply
nexttime
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#52
Report 1 week ago
#52
(Original post by mnot)
I mean I think its a good thing that UCAS limits admissions to 5 unis.
Oh I see.

Yeah no limits on applications would make running any kind of rigorous admissions system completely untenable.
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

What factors affect your mental health the most right now?

Anxiousness about lockdown easing (76)
4.77%
Uncertainty around my education (244)
15.31%
Uncertainty around my future career prospects (175)
10.98%
Lack of purpose or motivation (225)
14.12%
Lack of support system (eg. teachers, counsellors, delays in care) (71)
4.45%
Impact of lockdown on physical health (93)
5.83%
Loneliness (139)
8.72%
Financial worries (57)
3.58%
Concern about myself or my loves ones getting/having been ill (72)
4.52%
Exposure to negative news/social media (77)
4.83%
Lack of real life entertainment (83)
5.21%
Lack of confidence in making big life decisions (137)
8.59%
Worry about missed opportunities during the pandemic (145)
9.1%

Watched Threads

View All