krissy23
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I’m a current sophomore(10th grader) in the US. Soon to be a junior(11th grader). I already know that I’m dead set on going to uni in the UK as a international student. It’s just the degree that I’m uncertain about. For the longest time I was set on becoming a criminal or human rights/civil rights lawyer. However, just recently I found an interest in psychology. Specifically the forensic/criminal and counseling side of psychology. With me being in pre ib and ib next year I need to pick classes that will help me get into my desired courses at uni. So I have no idea if I want to go down the law or psychology root since I would be unable to switch any of my classes out for different ones. Overall I’m just terrified of making the wrong mistake for my future.
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Pugglet
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(Original post by krissy23)
I’m a current sophomore(10th grader) in the US. Soon to be a junior(11th grader). I already know that I’m dead set on going to uni in the UK as a international student. It’s just the degree that I’m uncertain about. For the longest time I was set on becoming a criminal or human rights/civil rights lawyer. However, just recently I found an interest in psychology. Specifically the forensic/criminal and counseling side of psychology. With me being in pre ib and ib next year I need to pick classes that will help me get into my desired courses at uni. So I have no idea if I want to go down the law or psychology root since I would be unable to switch any of my classes out for different ones. Overall I’m just terrified of making the wrong mistake for my future.
For law there are no subject requirements. So if you’re unsure pick the ones you need for psychology (have at least one essay subject tho as that would help with law)
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Arden University
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Hi there,

In England we do provide a variety of joint degrees whereby you have the ability to study two different (sometimes similar) subjects at the same time. I am currently studying a Criminology and Psychology degree and am in my third year, and is a mix of both criminology based and psychology based modules. This was great for me as when I applied I was indecisive about which subject I wanted to continue my studies in as I found both equally interesting.

I am not sure about the curriculum over in America, but it might be beneficial for you to look into some classes focused on criminology as there is a slight incorporation of psychology and law. For example, one of my criminology modules was on Policing and Police Powers - learning about different roles police play and assessing their accountability in terms of how professional they are with the powers they have. The modules I study is great, because I'm learning about the law whilst still understanding it from a social science perspective!
I would, however, suggest studying a variety of classes that give you a widespread knowledge as whilst there is no specific subjects you need to study for Law, for example, many universities over here look for that variety. As stated above also, essay based would be beneficial too

Toni Bennett,
Arden University Student Ambassador
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Swansea University Colleges
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(Original post by krissy23)
I’m a current sophomore(10th grader) in the US. Soon to be a junior(11th grader). I already know that I’m dead set on going to uni in the UK as a international student. It’s just the degree that I’m uncertain about. For the longest time I was set on becoming a criminal or human rights/civil rights lawyer. However, just recently I found an interest in psychology. Specifically the forensic/criminal and counseling side of psychology. With me being in pre ib and ib next year I need to pick classes that will help me get into my desired courses at uni. So I have no idea if I want to go down the law or psychology root since I would be unable to switch any of my classes out for different ones. Overall I’m just terrified of making the wrong mistake for my future.
Hi there

I hope you are keeping safe and well - great to hear you're considering studying in the UK! My name is Jess and I work at the School of Law at Swansea University. Swansea is a sea-side city in Wales, UK .

I thought I'd jump in here and reassure you that it is totally OK to keep your options open, and to highlight that we have an event coming up which may be helpful for you to come along to. Our Law and Criminology Showcase will take place on 21st and 22 April 2021, and I mention this event as the topics you have expressed an interest in will be explored within live taster sessions throughout the event (taking place 10am-6pm BST). You'll also have access to a range of helpful materials, the sessions will be recorded where possible, and you don't necessarily need to be interested in studying at Swansea, although we'd love to show you what we offer!

Here is a link if you wish to sign up: https://www.swansea.ac.uk/law/showcase-registration/

In terms of degree options, you may wish to keep your options open by studying a joint honours degree (e.g. LLB Law with Criminology, or Criminology with Psychology). At Swansea, our Criminology degrees are BScs (Bachelor of Sciences), and therefore focus on the biological, psychologial and sociological elements of criminology.

Law and criminology degrees open many doors, and equip you with skills that you can apply to many different roles. At Swansea we also have an extensive range of optional modules, meaning you can really tailor your degree to your interests It's worth being mindful that the legal systems here in the UK differ to those in America, and you would need to research routes to pracitising law within the UK/USA (if this was a route you wished to explore).

A taster of live sessions include the following, and the first may be of particular interest to you

• How do we explain Criminal Behaviour? Biological, Psychological and Sociological theories
Delivered by current PhD students Joe Janes and Jordan Dawson, this session will provide a taster of studying criminology at Swansea.
In this session we will outline some of the key theories we discuss in Criminology, taking an analytical view of Biological, Psychological and Sociological theories. We will ask students to apply these theories to real world examples of crime.

• Developing Mooting and Advocacy at Swansea, including a live ‘moot’
Mooting and Advocacy are legal practice-based skills. Advocacy involves the representation of clients in court and Mooting is the process of using advocacy in fictitious appeal courts, in both internal and external University competitions. Dr Matthew Parry (lecturer in law) and Billy Seagrim (lecturer in law and practising Barrister) will explain what provisions there are at Swansea University, how they are taught and supported and how they benefit our students.

• Cybercrime and Its Hidden Victims
This session will draw on notions of victimisation, particularly victims of a cyber-related crime. In the context of lockdown (Covid 19), society has become more reliant on different online platforms. With this increase in the use of technology, so has victimisation increased. However, research has shown that such victimisation is not always reported; thus, the victims remain hidden. In this session, we will consider some of the reasons why these types of crime remain underreported.

• When is ‘ethical hacking’ legal and ethical?
In this interactive session, you will be introduced to some key legal and ethical debates around the topic of ethical hacking. You'll find out a bit about this fascinating area of criminal law and how different shades of hackers - known as Black, White and Black 'Hats', may or not cross legal and ethical lines.

• Legal Issues in Sport
This session will provide an insight into what sports law can involve. The world of sport is relatively unique and how the law adapts to deal with legal issues can be fascinating and often very controversial. We will explore how the law and sport interact to create a dynamic and exciting area of legal practice. On field altercations, football hooliganism, drug testing of athlete's, negligent career ending tackles and the complex issue of defining gender in sport are among the aspects of sports law which will be discussed. This will hopefully be a lively session where you can voice your ideas and opinions on the involvement of the criminal law in sport, gender discrimination, concussion, and the human rights of athletes.

We have a thriving international community here at Swansea, and you may also be interested in exploring this page a little further - https://www.swansea.ac.uk/international-students/

More than happy to answer any specific questions you may have on email too - [email protected]

Take care, and best of luck with your studies,

Jess Hammett
Swansea University
Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law

Last edited by Swansea University Colleges; 2 months ago
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