Can I become a teacher with a BSc Environmental Science degree?

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croall95
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Hi all,

Firstly I'm very new to these forums, and very new to being a university student. I'm in the military and have been for 8 years now, so it's time for a career change.

I'm a first year student, studying a in BSc Environmental Science with the Open University. I want to find out if this degree would be sufficient for me to pursue a career teaching Key Stage 4 pupils in Science. If I need to be subject specific, it would be Biology.

Any advice or guidance is really helpful at this stage. I'm doing lots of research but seem to be getting confused about this area.

Best Wishes,
croall95
Last edited by croall95; 2 weeks ago
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WantBeAnonymous
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Regardless of what you study, you will still need to complete a PGCE teaching qualification.

Also what you study doesn’t matter, most teachers actually did something else before qualifying as a teacher. Although what they teach is usually similar to what they studied
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Get into Teaching
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Hi,
The entry requirements for any teacher training course is that you have a degree and GCSE's in English/Maths for secondary level teaching. On an individual level Schools and Universities may add additional entry criteria, but it's very often flexible, particularly if they notice your potential of being an outstanding teacher.

It's worth speaking with a Early Engagement Adviser if you are in your first year of your degree to help you to identify the best teacher training courses for you. Call 0800 389 2500 between 8:30 - 5pm, Mon - Fri and ask for one.

Hope that helps
Olivia
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Kumaa1995
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You will need to undertake a teaching qualification. To my knowledge, most teaching positions will require it, and some of them will allow you to undertake an appropriate teaching qualification whilst teaching, the latter more than likely being conditional on you being offered a position.
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by croall95)
Hi all,

Firstly I'm very new to these forums, and very new to being a university student. I'm in the military and have been for 8 years now, so it's time for a career change.

I'm a first year student, studying a in BSc Environmental Science with the Open University. I want to find out if this degree would be sufficient for me to pursue a career teaching Key Stage 4 pupils in Science. If I need to be subject specific, it would be Biology.

Any advice or guidance is really helpful at this stage. I'm doing lots of research but seem to be getting confused about this area.

Best Wishes,
croall95
Normally, you will need 50% of your modules to be relevant to the national curriculum in your subject. If you have a choice of modules, pick those that relevant to the national curriculum for KS3 and 4.

Do you have any qualifications in the other sciences?
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croall95
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(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
Normally, you will need 50% of your modules to be relevant to the national curriculum in your subject. If you have a choice of modules, pick those that relevant to the national curriculum for KS3 and 4.

Do you have any qualifications in the other sciences?
Hi!

Thanks for your response. I do not have any other qualifications other than my GCSEs.
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by croall95)
Hi!

Thanks for your response. I do not have any other qualifications, other than my GCSEs.
No A-level science at all? Weirdly that might be an issue for some schools (but others won't mind). Provided you can get the right sort of modules on your degree, you should be fine.

The SKE route may also be open to you if your degree doesn't quite have the right modules.
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croall95
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(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
No A-level science at all? Weirdly that might be an issue for some schools (but others won't mind). Provided you can get the right sort of modules on your degree, you should be fine.

The SKE route may also be open to you if your degree doesn't quite have the right modules.
No, I don't have A-Level science. I left school at 17 to join the Air Force. I understand some may have a problem with this, but A-Levels have never come up as a requirement but have always considered the SKE route.

I appreciate your response, I'm looking into both routes at the moment. The first being doing PGCE after my degree. The second route is looking at taking an SKE, but I understand this is sometimes done during Teacher Training.
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croall95
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(Original post by Get into Teaching)
Hi,
The entry requirements for any teacher training course is that you have a degree and GCSE's in English/Maths for secondary level teaching. On an individual level Schools and Universities may add additional entry criteria, but it's very often flexible, particularly if they notice your potential of being an outstanding teacher.

It's worth speaking with a Early Engagement Adviser if you are in your first year of your degree to help you to identify the best teacher training courses for you. Call 0800 389 2500 between 8:30 - 5pm, Mon - Fri and ask for one.

Hope that helps
Olivia
This has been very helpful, thank you!
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by croall95)
No, I don't have A-Level science. I left school at 17 to join the Air Force. I understand some may have a problem with this, but A-Levels have never come up as a requirement but have always considered the SKE route.

I appreciate your response, I'm looking into both routes at the moment. The first being doing PGCE after my degree. The second route is looking at taking an SKE, but I understand this is sometimes done during Teacher Training.
An SKE is not a teacher training course, it's something done to improve your subject knowledge before an ITT course. Are you confusing it with a SCITT?

It's not just about what will get you onto the PGCE, it's also about what will enable you to find jobs afterwards. Some schools care a lot about A-levels.
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Aarif - Newman University Rep
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(Original post by croall95)
Hi all,

Firstly I'm very new to these forums, and very new to being a university student. I'm in the military and have been for 8 years now, so it's time for a career change.

I'm a first year student, studying a in BSc Environmental Science with the Open University. I want to find out if this degree would be sufficient for me to pursue a career teaching Key Stage 4 pupils in Science. If I need to be subject specific, it would be Biology.

Any advice or guidance is really helpful at this stage. I'm doing lots of research but seem to be getting confused about this area.

Best Wishes,
croall95
Good afternoon,

I see that you are interested in studying for a PGCE in Biology. I have attached the Newman University website, directly to your chosen course. https://www.newman.ac.uk/course/pgce...eptember-2021/.
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croall95
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(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
An SKE is not a teacher training course, it's something done to improve your subject knowledge before an ITT course. Are you confusing it with a SCITT?

It's not just about what will get you onto the PGCE, it's also about what will enable you to find jobs afterwards. Some schools care a lot about A-levels.
Hi, yeah I'm aware the SKE is not a Teacher Training Course. I just think this is the route I may have to go down in order to get on a Teacher Training Course in the first place because of my Degree.

I'm not too familiar with an SCITT, are you able to expand on what this is?

Well, after my degree I would be more than happy to sit some A-Levels if this opens up my horizons. Thank you for your insight.
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by croall95)
Hi, yeah I'm aware the SKE is not a Teacher Training Course. I just think this is the route I may have to go down in order to get on a Teacher Training Course in the first place because of my Degree.

I'm not too familiar with an SCITT, are you able to expand on what this is?

Well, after my degree I would be more than happy to sit some A-Levels if this opens up my horizons. Thank you for your insight.
SCITT is school centered initial teacher training, it's an alternative to a uni based PGCE, like Schools Direct.
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croall95
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(Original post by SarcAndSpark)
SCITT is school centered initial teacher training, it's an alternative to a uni based PGCE, like Schools Direct.
Ah I see, thank you. I am trying to identify two main routes into a Teaching Career, so I will give SCITT a thought when I am doing my planning. Once I have my two routes I am going back to my Career Advisor to ensure I am on the right lines.

I appreciate your help, SarcAndSpark.
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