Who's had the vaccination?

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username5604436
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#41
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#41
(Original post by Oxford Mum)
What a great post. I wish I could rep it a thousand times.

I can remember my younger son (medic) coming home for the holidays at Easter 2020.

He said that younger people could get it and the symptoms were so mild they may not even know they had it. Immediately, I thought uh-oh... so they could be going out and about and unwittingly spreading the virus.

Therefore, if you are young, it would make sense to get this (overwhelmingly harmless) vaccine, not only for your own sake but for the sake of the shelf stacker in the supermarket, or the taxi driver, or the university tutor you may unwittingly infect in the future if you don't.
Getting a vaccine does not stop you from spreading a virus. If you are young and healthy covid, like the flu, will not make you seriously ill. There is absolutely no reason why any establishment or airline should impose restrictions on entry based on whether you've received a vaccine or not. It should be about whether you actually test negative for covid.
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ER141
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#42
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#42
(Original post by Greysync)
So can you be specific about which data you are disputing? Could you also educate us on the long term side effects studies of which will be extensive on these ‘vaccines’. Many Thanks. Ps please could you also enlighten us on the efficacy of Ivermectin as a prophylactic and treatment.
(Original post by Oxford Mum)
How can the bear "educate you" on the long term side effects of a recently developed vaccine? On the other hand, we have heard of the devastating effects of "long covid".

The vast, vast majority of symptoms from the AZ vaccine only last a couple of days.

The contraceptive pill causes more blood clots than Covid, and there is no massive scare story about that.
I could not agree more with Oxford Mum. Adding to that, people can report side effects they experience (yellow something, I can't remember). Whilst this means that there is a lot of data on side effects (currently only short term because it is new), it also means that people report things that may be a complete coincidence. The blood clots for example; people get them coincidentally after the jab, but when you look at the numbers, you would expect to get a certain number of people experiencing blood clots each year anyway, and with this massive number of people receiving the vaccine of course there will be coincidences.
Long term studies are ongoing, I think some vaccine producers are doing yearly checkups kind of thing, and there will also be independent ones before anyone says anything stupid like them faking good results or covering up bad ones.

Flying also can cause blood clots but that doesn't stop anyone wanting to jet off on holiday. If you need to travel by plane to go on holiday, despite the risks, how is that different to needing to get a vaccine to travel, despite the risks? (minimal risks in both cases)
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ER141
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#43
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#43
(Original post by Iasona)
Getting a vaccine does not stop you from spreading a virus. If you are young and healthy covid, like the flu, will not make you seriously ill. There is absolutely no reason why any establishment or airline should impose restrictions on entry based on whether you've received a vaccine or not. It should be about whether you actually test negative for covid.
If you are young and healthy covid MAY not make you seriously ill, at least not at the time, it may only leave you with serious long term conditions.

Also I think the death rate from flu is actually higher among young adults than the middle aged

I can kind of see your point about airlines, a negative test is important, but there are false negatives and aeroplanes use recirculated air (I think?) so the transmission risk in a plane is really high, so you want to be as sure as possible that people flying don't have covid. If they go off just negative tests, then you should have to have at least 2 before departure. In the hospital where I work patients need 6 negative tests before we conclusovely say "they don't have covid." I think the privately available ones, such as for a flight, are about £150 each. I'd rather get a £10 vaccine (AZ cost for the UK to buy, retail cost may be higher if we have to pay eventually). However I think countries themselves would be well within their rights to not let unvaccinated people into the country, as they can catch and spread the virus.

Does anyone know if you are less contagious if you've had the vaccine? I would theorise that since your antibodies fight it off, it remains in your body for less time so there is a shorter window where you are contagious. I don't know this though
Last edited by ER141; 3 weeks ago
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username5604436
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#44
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#44
(Original post by ER141)
If you are young and healthy covid MAY not make you seriously ill, at least not at the time, it may only leave you with serious long term conditions
My main point is that the user was spreading fake information. Being vaccinated doesn't stop you from carrying a virus.
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pipershannon02
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#45
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#45
I don’t under why people are refusing the vaccine
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pipershannon02
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#46
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The same people who are refusing it are probably the ones who break regulation and spread the virus
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pipershannon02
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#47
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I’m a young adult and at uni and I had the virus with no symptoms so I could have spread it around. My friends had it in October and a couple of them still can’t taste properly or smell properly and they were in their beds for a week and couldn’t move when they had the virus, it affects everyone no matter what anyone says
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ER141
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#48
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(Original post by Iasona)
My main point is that the user was spreading fake information. Being vaccinated doesn't stop you from carrying a virus.
But it can stop you from getting the virus, meaning there is less chance of it spreading. I would theorise that if your antibodies fight off the infection, there is less time that the virus is in your body and therefore a smaller window of time that you are contagious. I don't know though
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ER141
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#49
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(Original post by pipershannon02)
I’m a young adult and at uni and I had the virus with no symptoms so I could have spread it around. My friends had it in October and a couple of them still can’t taste properly or smell properly and they were in their beds for a week and couldn’t move when they had the virus, it affects everyone no matter what anyone says
Exactly, sometimes you just don't know the effects for a while. Hope you have fully recovered!
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username5604436
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#50
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(Original post by ER141)
But it can stop you from getting the virus, meaning there is less chance of it spreading. I would theorise that if your antibodies fight off the infection, there is less time that the virus is in your body and therefore a smaller window of time that you are contagious. I don't know though
No, it stops you from becoming ill from the disease. You can still become infected from a virus after getting vaccinated, but your body will be able to fight it much more quickly. Vaccines will reduce virus shedding though, which basically means less of the virus will come out of your nose and mouth. But you can definitely still spread it.
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Oxford Mum
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#51
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#51
I’m not in charge of an airline, am I? Ask them if you are not happy about the restrictions Iasona
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username5604436
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#52
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(Original post by Oxford Mum)
I’m not in charge of an airline, am I? Ask them if you are not happy about the restrictions Iasona
Maybe you need to re-read my post. I asked you to stop spreading false information, as a vaccinated person can still transmit a virus. That is all.
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dacb2f2dd4
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#53
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#53
(Original post by RainbowLad_)
How did you feel after a few hours? I had it done yesterday, and my God, I feel awful. I have recently awoken from the worst sleep of my life. I was too cold, so I put the heating on, then I was too hot. I feel a heavy, painful and numbing feeling in the affected arm. I am not looking forward to the next one.
Have had two Pfizer doses and felt pretty ok after both. Slight arm pain persisting for 24hrs after each, but little more than that, fortunately.
Colleagues reported having severe arm pain and raised regional lymph nodes.

A number of patients who’ve I’ve spoken to who had Astra Zeneca jab(s) reported feeling fluey (similar to your symptoms) for a few days.
Important to keep well-hydrated, you should be able to manage your symptoms with the painkillers you’d usually take for a headache (I’m sure you would have been told this at the time of your jab).

I’m sure you’ll soon be feeling much better
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ER141
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#54
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(Original post by Iasona)
No, it stops you from becoming ill from the disease. You can still become infected from a virus after getting vaccinated, but your body will be able to fight it much more quickly. Vaccines will reduce virus shedding though, which basically means less of the virus will come out of your nose and mouth. But you can definitely still spread it.
Yes this is what I was trying to say, though you said it better. Bottom line, vaccines reduce transmission, even if it's not a complete "No vaccine" zone
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ER141
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#55
(Original post by Oxford Mum)
What a great post. I wish I could rep it a thousand times.

I can remember my younger son (medic) coming home for the holidays at Easter 2020.

He said that younger people could get it and the symptoms were so mild they may not even know they had it. Immediately, I thought uh-oh... so they could be going out and about and unwittingly spreading the virus.

Therefore, if you are young, it would make sense to get this (overwhelmingly harmless) vaccine, not only for your own sake but for the sake of the shelf stacker in the supermarket, or the taxi driver, or the university tutor you may unwittingly infect in the future if you don't.
(Original post by Iasona)
Maybe you need to re-read my post. I asked you to stop spreading false information, as a vaccinated person can still transmit a virus. That is all.
The first post is what you (lasona) originally quoted, and there isn't actually any misinformation in there. Mostly it is about asymptomatic people spreading the virus. And yes, you are right, you can transmit the virus if you have had the vaccine, but not as well as if you haven't had the vaccine, and not for as long a period of time, so the vaccine helps reduce transmission
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mathsboy01
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#56
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#56
I had Oxford vaccine about 3 weeks ago. It hurt a lot in my left arm for a day or two but I had a bath with muscle relaxant salts and it got better. Also felt like I had a cold a bit and had a lump on my throat. Next one in 11 weeks
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Joinedup
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#57
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#57
(Original post by Iasona)
Maybe you need to re-read my post. I asked you to stop spreading false information, as a vaccinated person can still transmit a virus. That is all.
Reduced probability of spreading sounds like something airlines should be interested in.
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username5604436
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(Original post by ER141)
The first post is what you (lasona) originally quoted, and there isn't actually any misinformation in there. Mostly it is about asymptomatic people spreading the virus. And yes, you are right, you can transmit the virus if you have had the vaccine, but not as well as if you haven't had the vaccine, and not for as long a period of time, so the vaccine helps reduce transmission
I responded to this paragraph specifically:
‘Therefore, if you are young, it would make sense to get this (overwhelmingly harmless) vaccine, not only for your own sake but for the sake of the shelf stacker in the supermarket, or the taxi driver, or the university tutor you may unwittingly infect in the future if you don't.’

That is false information as getting vaccinated will not stop you infecting a ‘taxi driver or university tutor’.
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username5604436
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(Original post by Joinedup)
Reduced probability of spreading sounds like something airlines should be interested in.
However, they should be most interested in a negative covid test.
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ER141
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(Original post by Iasona)
I responded to this paragraph specifically:
‘Therefore, if you are young, it would make sense to get this (overwhelmingly harmless) vaccine, not only for your own sake but for the sake of the shelf stacker in the supermarket, or the taxi driver, or the university tutor you may unwittingly infect in the future if you don't.’

That is false information as getting vaccinated will not stop you infecting a ‘taxi driver or university tutor’.
Actually it might because there is a lower chance of transmission if you are vaccinated. Yes there is still a risk, I'm not disputing that, but it is safer for everyone if people get the vaccine, there isn't really a reason not to (if you aren't immunocompromised, pregnant, etc)
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