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amk94
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Hi everyone!

So..I've had 2/3 rejections for GEM interviews 2021, and with it being such a competitive process I'm sure I'm not alone.

As a non-science grad, I have invested a lot of effort in my GEM journey (research, applications, GAMSAT, Higher Chemistry, care work, and interviews) and don't plan to give up now!

I'm eager to strengthen my application for next year, and would love if people would share tips and plans for coming back stronger for GEM 2022 applications!

Any ideas for jobs, volunteering and work experience opportunities would be much appreciated!

Looking forward to hearing everyone's plans for reapplying for 2022.
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ecolier
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(Original post by amk94)
Hi everyone!

So..I've had 2/3 rejections for GEM interviews 2021, and with it being such a competitive process I'm sure I'm not alone.

As a non-science grad, I have invested a lot of effort in my GEM journey (research, applications, GAMSAT, Higher Chemistry, care work, and interviews) and don't plan to give up now!

I'm eager to strengthen my application for next year, and would love if people would share tips and plans for coming back stronger for GEM 2022 applications!

Any ideas for jobs, volunteering and work experience opportunities would be much appreciated!

Looking forward to hearing everyone's plans for reapplying for 2022.
I would assume that most GEM 2022 re-applicants would just post here: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=6100344 but good luck to you!
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Marathi
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I'm a final year student now, but was/am a non-science applicant too.

I had 2 years of pre-interview rejections due to GAMSAT score not being good enough. I only had a 2.2 so my options were limited, so decided to do a masters to open up additional options (Warwick + Swansea) which I would highly recommend to anyone with solely a 2.2 undergrad degree. In my third year of applying I got 4/4 interviews, shortlisted by 3, and an eventual offer.

The best decision I made was to give up on my previous career and to become a full-time HCA, which I did after my first year of being rejected. I knew I didn't want to carry on doing what I was doing and was set on medicine. Working in the NHS full-time and being part of the multidisciplinary team within healthcare gives you an incredible insight. It also provides opportunities to meet doctors of varying seniority to get advice on applying, career options, positives and negatives of the job, etc. it is so hard to get these opportunities otherwise (unless you're from a family of docs or have doc friends).

Alongside this you develop fantastic skills which are transferable to being a doctor - communication (with patients and staff), hands on clinical skills, basic knowledge of conditions you will learn about at med school, understanding the roles of other AHPs, and many more I could list. It's really obvious in your first year of med school to distinguish between those who have an abundance of experience and those who have done the bare minimum. And whilst med school makes sure you are all at a minimal competence level before you leave, it's one less thing to worry about if you can approach your clinical exams and placements with confidence due to your experience and imo it will make you a better doctor because of it.
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rubberduckies321
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Just wondering if there are other graduates out there with a total of 4 rejections. I graduated with a 1st in Medical Physiology, Ucat score of 2800, Sj band 1. Completely stumped on what to do now after receiving my final rejections yesterday
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ecolier
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(Original post by rubberduckies321)
Just wondering if there are other graduates out there with a total of 4 rejections. I graduated with a 1st in Medical Physiology, Ucat score of 2800, Sj band 1. Completely stumped on what to do now after receiving my final rejections yesterday
I'm sorry to hear of your rejections. Unfortunately medicine is competitive, graduate entry medicine more so.

It's best to heed the advice above, take a gap year to work / volunteer / do more work experience and retry again next year.

If you could afford it, you can also apply to the slightly less competitive standard undergrad medicine as a grad - but note that it would still be much more competitive compared to school leavers applying to the very same course.
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