Chem equilibrium system

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Universecolors
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#1
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#1
If u have an equilibrium system and you leave it all night in a sealed flask and come back for it in the morning. Given that the forward reaction for that reaction is exothermic, would heat be lost in the flask by conduction. And if the heat is lost that means that more product is formed.
So the question is , is the heat lost from the flask affecting the equilibrium ? Is it disrupting it and making it irreversible ?
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charco
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#2
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#2
(Original post by Universecolors)
If u have an equilibrium system and you leave it all night in a sealed flask and come back for it in the morning. Given that the forward reaction for that reaction is exothermic, would heat be lost in the flask by conduction. And if the heat is lost that means that more product is formed.
So the question is , is the heat lost from the flask affecting the equilibrium ? Is it disrupting it and making it irreversible ?
If it's already at equilibrium there is no exo or endothermic process, or rather they cancel out.
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Universecolors
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#3
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#3
(Original post by charco)
If it's already at equilibrium there is no exo or endothermic process, or rather they cancel out.
But you leave it overnight , and you come back and see that all the reactants turned to product. Is it because of the heat that is lost through the flask ?
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charco
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#4
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#4
(Original post by Universecolors)
But you leave it overnight , and you come back and see that all the reactants turned to product. Is it because of the heat that is lost through the flask ?
If the reaction proceeds one way or the other, it's not at equilibrium, you are talking about a reaction.
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Universecolors
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#5
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#5
(Original post by charco)
If the reaction proceeds one way or the other, it's not at equilibrium, you are talking about a reaction.
See , you have a reversible reaction and you put it in a sealed flask and observe that it reached equilibrium .
But when you leave it all night and return in the morning , you see that all the reactants turned to product. What happened to the flask during the night ?
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charco
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#6
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#6
(Original post by Universecolors)
See , you have a reversible reaction and you put it in a sealed flask and observe that it reached equilibrium .
But when you leave it all night and return in the morning , you see that all the reactants turned to product. What happened to the flask during the night ?
If it is at equilibrium there can be no change in reactants or products, unless you change the conditions.
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Universecolors
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#7
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#7
(Original post by charco)
If it is at equilibrium there can be no change in reactants or products, unless you change the conditions.
Yes so the reaction mixture releases heat in the forward reaction and that heat is lost by conduction through the flask , so is that a change in the condition and will that cause the reactants to turn all completely to products
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Universecolors
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#8
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#8
(Original post by charco)
If the reaction proceeds one way or the other, it's not at equilibrium, you are talking about a reaction.
Yes so the reaction mixture releases heat in the forward reaction and that heat is lost by conduction through the flask , so is that a change in the condition and will that cause the reactants to turn all completely to products
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Universecolors
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#9
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#9
If you have a sealed flask with a reversible reaction mixture ( equilibrium , forward is exothermic ) , but when you leave it all night and come to observe it in the morning , you see that all the reactants have turned to products. What is the reason for this ? Is it because it is cold at night and the heat is lost through the flask ? Or what happened to the flask that caused that ?
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charco
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#10
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#10
(Original post by Universecolors)
Yes so the reaction mixture releases heat in the forward reaction and that heat is lost by conduction through the flask , so is that a change in the condition and will that cause the reactants to turn all completely to products
No, the reverse process is endothermic and absorbs heat. If the forward reaction tries to happen is just gets compensated for by the reverse reaction. That's what equilibrium is, no change in reactant or product concentration.
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charco
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#11
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#11
(Original post by Universecolors)
If you have a sealed flask with a reversible reaction mixture ( equilibrium , forward is exothermic ) , but when you leave it all night and come to observe it in the morning , you see that all the reactants have turned to products. What is the reason for this ? Is it because it is cold at night and the heat is lost through the flask ? Or what happened to the flask that caused that ?
Don't make repeat threads on the same topic!
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Universecolors
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#12
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#12
(Original post by charco)
No, the reverse process is endothermic and absorbs heat. If the forward reaction tries to happen is just gets compensated for by the reverse reaction. That's what equilibrium is, no change in reactant or product concentration.
I don’t think you understood my question ,
I mentioned that ALL the reactants changed to product ,
What might have caused that during the night ?
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charco
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#13
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#13
(Original post by Universecolors)
I don’t think you understood my question ,
I mentioned that ALL the reactants changed to product ,
What might have caused that during the night ?
If this happened then the system was not at equilibrium, unless the conditions changed ...
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Universecolors
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#14
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#14
(Original post by charco)
If this happened then the system was not at equilibrium, unless the conditions changed ...
Ok so my question is , is the heat loss from flask something that would change the condition
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charco
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#15
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#15
(Original post by Universecolors)
Ok so my question is , is the heat loss from flask something that would change the condition
No, there is no mechanism by which the flask could produce heat (if it is at equilibrium).
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Universecolors
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#16
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#16
(Original post by charco)
No, there is no mechanism by which the flask could produce heat (if it is at equilibrium).
I’m not saying it produces heat , I’m saying heat is lost from there
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charco
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#17
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#17
(Original post by Universecolors)
I’m not saying it produces heat , I’m saying heat is lost from there
Do you understand the zeroth law of thermodynamics?
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Universecolors
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#18
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#18
(Original post by charco)
Do you understand the zeroth law of thermodynamics?
Ok can I send you the actual question through somewhere ? I can’t send the picture here
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Universecolors
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#19
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#19
(Original post by charco)
No, there is no mechanism by which the flask could produce heat (if it is at equilibrium).
Why do all the reactants then turn to products when left overnight ? The system was at equilibrium in the beginning
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charco
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#20
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#20
(Original post by Universecolors)
Why do all the reactants then turn to products when left overnight ? The system was at equilibrium in the beginning
The only three possibilities are:
1. The system was not at equilibrium.
2. The conditions changed.
3. Some pixies spontaneously materialised and interfered with the reaction.
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