How's does someone get on the property market

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richard10012
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#1
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#1
Property prices are crazy in the south. How's are you meant to buy a property? I seen alot of share ownership which I could afford but I would never been able to afford a property outright.
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Quady
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#2
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#2
Save up or don't buy a property in the south.
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Shay.124
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#3
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#3
(Original post by richard10012)
Property prices are crazy in the south. How's are you meant to buy a property? I seen alot of share ownership which I could afford but I would never been able to afford a property outright.
Yeah I think a lot of young people are in the same boat. Buying a house by yourself is nearly impossible these days on a normal salary. Shared ownership looks like a promising route into the housing market.
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Reue
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#4
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#4
(Original post by Sharaaa)
Yeah I think a lot of young people are in the same boat. Buying a house by yourself is nearly impossible these days on a normal salary. Shared ownership looks like a promising route into the housing market.
It's always been nearly impossible to buy a house in the south on your own. Partner up, whether that be romantically or just financially.
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Smeraldettoi
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#5
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#5
A) Become a multi millionaire
B) inherit
C) you can’t; move up north where houses are cheaper
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Kutie Karen
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#6
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#6
Wouldn't recomend shared ownership. It is a big stretch and you might have to save save save.
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richard10012
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#7
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#7
Why are houses in the north cheaper than the south? The government is investing in the north
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Smeraldettoi
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#8
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#8
(Original post by richard10012)
Why are houses in the north cheaper than the south? The government is investing in the north
The economy is generally worse up north, less higher paying jobs etc
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PhoenixFortune
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#9
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#9
Most of my friends who live in the south either inherited the property, bought a small leasehold flat (which can be cheaper than freehold depending on the number of years left on the lease), or bought property with their partner/a family member. No one I know has bought anything bigger than a flat by themselves if they were a first time buyer.
Last edited by PhoenixFortune; 1 year ago
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richard10012
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#10
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#10
But won't all the investment that the government are doing increase properties prices in the north and midlands?
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spanker
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#11
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#11
Don't buy shared ownership, you will end up paying more overall plus some places refuse to let you ladder up 100% ownership.
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Quady
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#12
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#12
(Original post by richard10012)
But won't all the investment that the government are doing increase properties prices in the north and midlands?
What investment in the North....?

3,000 jobs at HMT? yeah that'll really move the market for the 1,000,000+ homes in Yorkshire
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HumbleBee_x
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#13
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#13
I'd never get on the property ladder single
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neal95
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#14
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#14
Make your money work for you/ Maximise the income you do have - Don't just keep it in a current account or cash ISA with lousy interest rates, put it in a solid vehicle, such as a balanced investment trust with different types of companies.

Therefore, over a period of time, your money will compound, and a portion of this can then be used for a deposit for a house or if you want to then you could probably buy somewhere outright (although this is not a very efficient use of cash unless you have loads of it).

So over the 3/5/10 year time period that it would take you to save, you will have promotions or job moves and also your compounded money to count on. Its not easy and takes research rather than just throwing money in individual shares or average passive funds, but it can be a great way to turbocharge your disposable. Its not an overnight process however, and should only be done if you have spare money, on top of your living costs, and if you are comfortable with things not increasing in a linear fashion.
Last edited by neal95; 1 year ago
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Quady
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#15
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#15
(Original post by neal95)
Therefore, over a period of time,
What period?
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neal95
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#16
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#16
(Original post by Quady)
What period?
as mentioned in the final paragraph of my post, 3/5/10 years
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Quady
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#17
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#17
(Original post by neal95)
as mentioned in the final paragraph of my post, 3/5/10 years
Interesting

why is the total return of City on London investment trust down over the last three years? A cash ISA would've done better over five years.

https://www.hl.co.uk/shares/shares-s...-trust-ord-25p

FYI, that's the only investment trust I own.
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neal95
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#18
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#18
(Original post by Quady)
Interesting

why is the total return of City on London investment trust down over the last three years? A cash ISA would've done better over five years.

https://www.hl.co.uk/shares/shares-s...-trust-ord-25p

FYI, that's the only investment trust I own.
I just checked out the trust, it looks very "old world" and 20th century, relying on holdings like tobacco and oil which are less likely to have capital growth but more likely to be favoured by pensioners and pension funds because they produce a reliable dividend. I think it said the yield is 5.02 %, so it won't really shoot the lights out in terms of share price growth, but is steady and reliable. British investors are famously conservative, especially retail investors, and so as long as they get reliable dividends each quarter then i don't think they care too much about the share price.

However, lots of pundits at the moment seem to think that old world companies such as these will see somewhat of a resurgence as the economy starts to kick back into life, particularly aviation and oil stocks.

I lean more towards Consumer discretionary companies + Tech + Bioscience companies + Health etc. The trust focuses more on Capital growth and only has a yield of 0.75%, as most of the companies are focused on growth and therefore don't pay a dividend like the old school established companies. The trust im in launched in March 2018 and is up 201% in those 3 years (obviously last year was a crazy year and no doubt skewed the figure massively).
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Quady
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#19
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#19
(Original post by neal95)
I just checked out the trust, it looks very "old world" and 20th century, relying on holdings like tobacco and oil which are less likely to have capital growth but more likely to be favoured by pensioners and pension funds because they produce a reliable dividend. I think it said the yield is 5.02 %, so it won't really shoot the lights out in terms of share price growth, but is steady and reliable. British investors are famously conservative, especially retail investors, and so as long as they get reliable dividends each quarter then i don't think they care too much about the share price.

However, lots of pundits at the moment seem to think that old world companies such as these will see somewhat of a resurgence as the economy starts to kick back into life, particularly aviation and oil stocks.

I lean more towards Consumer discretionary companies + Tech + Bioscience companies + Health etc. The trust focuses more on Capital growth and only has a yield of 0.75%, as most of the companies are focused on growth and therefore don't pay a dividend like the old school established companies. The trust im in launched in March 2018 and is up 201% in those 3 years (obviously last year was a crazy year and no doubt skewed the figure massively).
Which trust?

So you don't have five or ten year performance? The trust I am invested launched in 1860.
Last edited by Quady; 1 year ago
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neal95
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#20
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#20
(Original post by Quady)
Which trust?

So you don't have five or ten year performance? The trust I am invested launched in 1860.
Baillie Gifford US Growth Trust. There is no 5 year record for this trust, but it is essentially the closed ended version of Baillie Gifford American, with a bit more invested in private companies and the ability to leverage. A large part of it therefore apes Baillie Gifford American, which has gained 198% over 3 years, and 380% over 5 years.

Baillie Gifford American launched in 1997 and has made solid returns for people. I'm averse to open ended vehicles on the whole however, and prefer the stability and less panic in closed ended investments.
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