Louisee16
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Primary teaching or nursing? I’m so stuck. Pros and cons of each would be helpful!
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Dragon24
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You don't take work home with you after a nursing shift.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by Louisee16)
Primary teaching or nursing? I’m so stuck. Pros and cons of each would be helpful!
Pros teaching: No shifts. You see children learn and progress. Rewarding - you are 'in charge' in your classroom
Con: marking and lesson prep takes time, some parents think their child ca do no wrong

Pros nursing: seeing people get better
Con: seeing people in pain/dying; shifts; little opportunity to influence treatment
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Louisee16
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(Original post by Muttley79)
Pros teaching: No shifts. You see children learn and progress. Rewarding - you are 'in charge' in your classroom
Con: marking and lesson prep takes time, some parents think their child ca do no wrong

Pros nursing: seeing people get better
Con: seeing people in pain/dying; shifts; little opportunity to influence treatment
Thank you!!
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Kingston University
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Hi,

I do teaching at Kingston uni, so if you have any questions about the course let me know!

I was debating between teaching and nursing for a while before I finally decided. It is true there are pros and cons of each, but it really depends on what sort of work you want to be doing.

Nursing is a very stressful, demanding career and you have to do 12 hour shifts a lot of the time so it is very long work days. Similarly, it can be unsociable hours when you do night shifts etc and I know a lot of people have struggled to keep relationships going in this career because it is difficult to make time to see people. Obviously with nursing it is not glamorous, you will have to do a lot of different things with personal care sometimes and it can be very stressful when people's lives are on the line. However, with all that said, it is a very rewarding career as you are always helping people and it is great when you can save people's lives and care for them when they are getting better. If you are squeamish then it is definitely not a career for you - there's a lot of blood and broken bones etc. Hence why I decided against it as I can't deal with things like that very well lol. Some of my friends do nursing and they enjoy it. There is a lot of science involved and it can be really interesting learning about how our body works etc. The other thing with nursing is that you aren't limited to one thing; you could do midwifery, adult nursing, child nursing, mental health nursing etc. So, there is a lot to choose!!

I decided on teaching because it is more sociable hours (normal 9-5 ish job) and you get A LOT of holiday, which is a bonus!! You will always get Christmas off to, whereas with nursing you might have to work on days like that. The only downside is that you can't book any days off as you are obvs expected to teach the kids every school day, so with this jobs you can only have the holidays off. I wouldn't get put off by the marking because you don't always have to do work at home and take it home with you. The school day finishes at 3.15 ish, so you can stay at the school until 4 or 5 and do your marking then so that you don't have to bring it home with you. As long as you keep up to date with it then it really isn't an issue. However, during the holidays you will probably be planning future lessons, especially during summer as you will need to plan for the next year. Although, once you have various plans, you can reuse them so you don't always have to plan new things constantly. I think people think it is a huge workload with teaching and yes there is a lot of work, but there is with any job. As long as you keep up to date with it all then that is fine. With teaching it is so rewarding being able to teach your own class of children and decorate your class room and plan your own lessons; that is why I love it. Plus you can teach any year group so it is nice to swap around sometimes and expand your knowledge about things. Yes parents can be a bit arsey at times, but so can customers or patients in any customer service job. You would deffo get arsey people in nursing too.

I hope I have helped, obviously I am slightly biased as I am doing teaching and I don't know much about working as a nurse but I have given you a few things to think about to help your decision.


- Verity
Last edited by Kingston University; 2 weeks ago
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Louisee16
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(Original post by Kingston University)
Hi,

I do teaching at Kingston uni, so if you have any questions about the course let me know!

I was debating between teaching and nursing for a while before I finally decided. It is true there are pros and cons of each, but it really depends on what sort of work you want to be doing.

Nursing is a very stressful, demanding career and you have to do 12 hour shifts a lot of the time so it is very long work days. Similarly, it can be unsociable hours when you do night shifts etc and I know a lot of people have struggled to keep relationships going in this career because it is difficult to make time to see people. Obviously with nursing it is not glamorous, you will have to do a lot of different things with personal care sometimes and it can be very stressful when people's lives are on the line. However, with all that said, it is a very rewarding career as you are always helping people and it is great when you can save people's lives and care for them when they are getting better. If you are squeamish then it is definitely not a career for you - there's a lot of blood and broken bones etc. Hence why I decided against it as I can't deal with things like that very well lol. Some of my friends do nursing and they enjoy it. There is a lot of science involved and it can be really interesting learning about how our body works etc. The other thing with nursing is that you aren't limited to one thing; you could do midwifery, adult nursing, child nursing, mental health nursing etc. So, there is a lot to choose!!

I decided on teaching because it is more sociable hours (normal 9-5 ish job) and you get A LOT of holiday, which is a bonus!! You will always get Christmas off to, whereas with nursing you might have to work on days like that. The only downside is that you can't book any days off as you are obvs expected to teach the kids every school day, so with this jobs you can only have the holidays off. I wouldn't get put off by the marking because you don't always have to do work at home and take it home with you. The school day finishes at 3.15 ish, so you can stay at the school until 4 or 5 and do your marking then so that you don't have to bring it home with you. As long as you keep up to date with it then it really isn't an issue. However, during the holidays you will probably be planning future lessons, especially during summer as you will need to plan for the next year. Although, once you have various plans, you can reuse them so you don't always have to plan new things constantly. I think people think it is a huge workload with teaching and yes there is a lot of work, but there is with any job. As long as you keep up to date with it all then that is fine. With teaching it is so rewarding being able to teach your own class of children and decorate your class room and plan your own lessons; that is why I love it. Plus you can teach any year group so it is nice to swap around sometimes and expand your knowledge about things. Yes parents can be a bit arsey at times, but so can customers or patients in any customer service job. You would deffo get arsey people in nursing too.

I hope I have helped, obviously I am slightly biased as I am doing teaching and I don't know much about working as a nurse but I have given you a few things to think about to help your decision.


- Verity
Wow thank you so much, this is actually really helpful and so in depth ! Hope I make the right decision
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Kingston University
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(Original post by Louisee16)
Wow thank you so much, this is actually really helpful and so in depth ! Hope I make the right decision
No worries! Good luck with whatever you decide!

- Verity
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hotpud
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Teaching is easier to manage if you have a family. Nursing shifts are often 12+ hours plus an hour break and commuting time.
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eduorclinpsych
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I big positive for both is that no two days are the same.

That being said, if you're like me and don't like too much set structure, shifts sounds exciting/something different (also to be said, I'm a secondary school teacher and not a nurse). Also, you get to meet and work with a variety of different people/predicaments.

On the other hand, with teaching you know where you'll be and what you need to do throughout the year, you get to experience the growth of the same pupils/students over time which can be very overwhelming and a different kind of stress but extremely rewarding too. It's a very stable environment and you are given a lot of autonomy in a lot of ways if you have your own class (primary) and room. That can help you to feel like you're managing your workload rather than trying to manage a wider workload you're not entirely in charge of.

With nursing, is there a particular branch you're interested in?

Maybe observing for a day or two in a primary and/or medical setting will help. Going into teaching I had no idea whether I wanted to go down the primary or secondary route but a day and a half in of observing a primary school I definitely knew it wasn't for me.
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2003a39
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AI is going to cut out many jobs in the future, the chances of teachers being cut out is very low, futureproof in other words.
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eduorclinpsych
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(Original post by 2003a39)
AI is going to cut out many jobs in the future, the chances of teachers being cut out is very low, futureproof in other words.
Do you think? I honestly wouldn't be surprised if the 'norm' for teaching went to 4 days a week, one day online etc.

I certainly very much enjoyed home-learning as did a lot of my students and their guardians. It was quite liberating and offered a lot more time for them to explore secondary research/information.
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2003a39
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(Original post by eduorclinpsych)
Do you think? I honestly wouldn't be surprised if the 'norm' for teaching went to 4 days a week, one day online etc.

I certainly very much enjoyed home-learning as did a lot of my students and their guardians. It was quite liberating and offered a lot more time for them to explore secondary research/information.
Online learning is still in its infancy and is flawed in numerous ways from a student's perspective. I feel like online learning will be available for pupils/students who are absent but able to learn. By AI I mean replacing teachers with robots, but emulating emotional intelligence is going to take many years before it becomes the norm, 20 years minimum as a mild guess. Online learning is quite liberating, but family life and working in an isolated environment should be taken into consideration.
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Louisee16
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(Original post by eduorclinpsych)
I big positive for both is that no two days are the same.

That being said, if you're like me and don't like too much set structure, shifts sounds exciting/something different (also to be said, I'm a secondary school teacher and not a nurse). Also, you get to meet and work with a variety of different people/predicaments.

On the other hand, with teaching you know where you'll be and what you need to do throughout the year, you get to experience the growth of the same pupils/students over time which can be very overwhelming and a different kind of stress but extremely rewarding too. It's a very stable environment and you are given a lot of autonomy in a lot of ways if you have your own class (primary) and room. That can help you to feel like you're managing your workload rather than trying to manage a wider workload you're not entirely in charge of.

With nursing, is there a particular branch you're interested in?

Maybe observing for a day or two in a primary and/or medical setting will help. Going into teaching I had no idea whether I wanted to go down the primary or secondary route but a day and a half in of observing a primary school I definitely knew it wasn't for me.
Thank you for all the info ! I need to get experience first hand in both settings to give myself a better idea of what to expect but struggling at the minute because of everything going on!
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