AMA: Autism Awareness Week.

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glassalice
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I may take a little while to answer any questions as I want to fully reference my replies when I deem it necessary.

Obviously I am one autistic person, not all autistic people and although I hope that other autistic people might resonate with the answers I give, I am not speaking for everyone. On a similar note, if you have a good knowledge of autism people feel free to answer any of the questions put to me/ challenge any of my answers.

Finally, I do not affiliate myself with any specific autism group, this includes but is not limited to '#actuallyautistic' and the puzzle piece troupe (I greatly dislike both).

Edit:
Please don't worry about sounding stupid or coming across as being offensive because I don't get easily offended. Although, please keep it polite.
Last edited by glassalice; 2 weeks ago
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Wise Goldie
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\^_^/
Moonlight rain
ellaa01
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Oceanwater
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Shiz I missed this thread sorry!

Anyways, how does autism affect your life?- basic and general I know but I'm curious. Everyone's experience of Autism is unique so I want to know yours - both of yours.
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Oceanwater
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Oh, and are there any misconceptions about autism that you want to clear?
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tinygirl96
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Tell me more about how autism affects you
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Wise Goldie
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(Original post by Oceanwater)
Do you mean you had it up until you were about 12-13 and now that's changed or do u mean it started when you were 12-13 and you still have it?
Ffs Tsr just bring back the old editing thingy magiggy!!!
no you always have it i meant up to 13 i had problems i was well behind most people in not all my age and although i learned more i still behind so i not learned stuff that you know(sorry i cant explain it well)
Last edited by Wise Goldie; 2 weeks ago
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ClaraFangirl
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(Original post by glassalice)
I may take a little while to answer any questions as I want to fully reference my replies when I deem it necessary.

Obviously I am one autistic person, not all autistic people and although I hope that other autistic people might resonate with the answers I give, I am not speaking for everyone. On a similar note, if you have a good knowledge of autism people feel free to answer any of the questions put to me/ challenge any of my answers.

Finally, I do not affiliate myself with any specific autism group, this includes but is not limited to '#actuallyautistic' and the puzzle piece troupe (I greatly dislike both).
Why do you greatly dislike #actuallyautistic?
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glassalice
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(Original post by ClaraFangirl)
Why do you greatly dislike #actuallyautistic?
Why I dislike '#actuallyautistic'.



#actuallyautistic isn't an organised group of people, rather it is used on social media to indicate that your beliefs align with a certain set of values, in the same way that putting your pronouns, putting #brexit or putting #blm in your bio does. Most accounts that use the #actuallyautistic also promote ideas associated with the far left such as intersectionality.

I like some of the content that is shared by accounts that support #actuallyautistic- ie. Talking about issues pertaining to institutional abuse, inability to access diagnostic services, encouraging patient centered care...


However, these social media accounts promote some deeply unrealistic/ down right stupid ideas, some examples of the things I have most commonly seen:

Autistic people are experts in autism

Bringing up an autistic child than isn’t harder than bringing up a neurotypical child. If you disagree with this statement, you clearly believe that autistic people are burdens.

Autism never effects a person's ability to make medical decisions.

Masking is an inherently bad thing. It is always wrong to encourage an autistic person to become better at masking.

Capitalism is the reason why your style of communication is not appreciated.

Neurotypicals oppress neurodiverse people.

Accounts that associate themselves with #actuallyautistic often act under the assumption that they speak for all autistic people/ are the true voice of autism.
Last edited by glassalice; 2 weeks ago
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Interea
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(Original post by glassalice)
Why I dislike '#actuallyautistic'.



#actuallyautistic isn't an organised group of people, rather it is used on social media to indicate that your beliefs align with a certain set of values, in the same way that putting your pronouns, putting #brexit or putting #blm in your bio does. Most accounts that use the #actuallyautistic also promote ideas associated with the far left such as intersectionality.

I like some of the content that is shared by accounts that support #actuallyautistic- ie. Talking about issues pertaining to institutional abuse, inability to access diagnostic services, encouraging patient centered care...


However, these social media accounts promote some deeply unrealistic/ down right stupid ideas, some examples of the things I have most commonly seen:

Autistic people are experts in autism

Bringing up an autistic child than isn’t harder than bringing up a neurotypical child. If you disagree with this statement, you clearly believe that autistic people are burdens.

Autism never effects a person's ability to make medical decisions.

Masking is an inherently bad thing. It is always wrong to encourage an autistic person to become better at masking.

Capitalism is the reason why your style of communication is not appreciated.

Neurotypicals oppress neurodiverse people.

Accounts that associate themselves with #actuallyautistic often act under the assumption that they speak for all autistic people/ are the true voice of autism.
I didn't realise it had become like that, but I guess any hashtag created to allow autistic people to speak for themselves rather than be spoken for would evolve towards a "we know everything about autism" type thing. It's definitely a tricky balance to find, on the one hand I know more about my experience of being autistic than my neurotypical doctor can, but I definitely don't know as much about autism itself as they do!
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