ssokka
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how do i say this formally and sounding clever:

mr birling is presented by priestly as a foolish hypocritical idiot in his views on absolutely everything therefore castigating the upper class as being extremely ignorant. This is effective because a 1945 upper class audience would reflect on themselves and their views towards socialism.
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sym1105
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(Original post by ssokka)
how do i say this formally and sounding clever:

mr birling is presented by priestly as a foolish hypocritical idiot in his views on absolutely everything therefore castigating the upper class as being extremely ignorant. This is effective because a 1945 upper class audience would reflect on themselves and their views towards socialism.
Throughout the play, Priestley represents Mr Birling as a laughing stock for the audience that watch the play. Specifically, the use of dramatic irony that is embedded prior to the discovery of Eve/Daisy's death for example the 'unsinkable Titanic' and 'war's impossible...there isn't a chance a war' supports this view. As the play was set in 1912 (which is pre-War era) and written for the audience of 1945 (post-WW2 era), the audience immediately view Mr Birling to be a fool in his perspective and his lack of perspective, therefore castigating the upper class as being extremely arrogant. In this way, Priestley orchestrates the character of Birling in this manner to educate the 1945 upper class audience to reflect on themselves and their actions, with their views on socialism.

Hope this helps! You can obviously expand on it.
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tinygirl96
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Hello

Use some different quotes from the text to support your response. In order to build up your essay and to strengthen the entire essay I would recommend using your notes as a source of fodder to allow you to be free of any un needed bias etc. Focus on Mr Birling and how he is presented through out the whole play in question. Highlight in blue for example sentences that tell you more about him. Read beyond the lines of the text carefully to reveal hidden information about the characters.
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ssokka
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(Original post by Samira Miah)
Throughout the play, Priestley represents Mr Birling as a laughing stock for the audience that watch the play. Specifically, the use of dramatic irony that is embedded prior to the discovery of Eve/Daisy's death for example the 'unsinkable Titanic' and 'war's impossible...there isn't a chance a war' supports this view. As the play was set in 1912 (which is pre-War era) and written for the audience of 1945 (post-WW2 era), the audience immediately view Mr Birling to be a fool in his perspective and his lack of perspective, therefore castigating the upper class as being extremely arrogant. In this way, Priestley orchestrates the character of Birling in this manner to educate the 1945 upper class audience to reflect on themselves and their actions, with their views on socialism.

Hope this helps! You can obviously expand on it.
thank you so much! this helped a lot! xx
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jamesg2
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I would suggest this about Mr. Birling.

Mr Birling represents the views of many Edwardian business men. He is blatant in seeking the financial support of the Croft family - who in Lady Croft clearly look down on him and in using his daughter’s intention to marry Gerald as a means to create a bridge between the families which he hopes his business will benefit from.

He is a business man who demonstrates no interest in the working condition of his workers and should any worker complain - even though like Eva they are seen as competent and are being considered for promotion - he will immediately sack them. Priestly’s description of the history of Eva Smith not only highlights the reality for the unemployed woman but also through Gerald the exploitation of women. An exploitation that - though not with Eva - Mr Birling was also involved in and which his wife was well aware of and accepted. It is one of the many ironies in the play that to be Mrs Birling she had to accept Mr. Birlings philandering.

Mr. Birling’s view on the Titanic was the universal view of all in Britain. Throughout Britain there was a conceit that the Titanic - and hence its name - was unsinkable. Made by one of the finest shipyards in Britain - Harland and Wolf - the lesson about the Titanic is that no ship was unsinkable. It was the arrogance of Mr. Birling's kind to assume that it was impossible to sink.

This same arrogance can be seen in his view that there will be no war with Europe. Unlike Titanic - in this case there was real evidence that there could be a war and the Mr. Birlings of Britain ignored those warnings.The irony is that the war - when it did come - wiped out the Mr. Birlings.

The Mr. Birlings of Edwardian Britain were a conceited selfish class who had no interest in anyone else but themselves. Unlike Sheila and Eric who genuinely regret their part Gerald is just as bad as Birling. It is another of the ironies in this play that it is only Mrs Croft who sees through Birling.
Last edited by jamesg2; 2 months ago
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