How do I convince my teacher to let me take A level philosophy early?

Watch
sqiddy747
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#1
Right now, I am in Year 9 and will be starting on the GCSE courses next term. Before September, I wasn't doing great in R+P (religion and philosophy) but from the beginning of the academic year, I've definitely changed my mindset and position on this matter.

In November/December, I borrowed an A level textbook (Metaphysics of God and Metaphysics of Mind) and throughout the past term, I have been applying this content to what we've been doing in class - the existence of God and dualism/physicalism. This clearly hasn't gone unnoticed by either of my two teachers, and I have approached one of them several times with questions, so I would think that he knows of my interest.

In about Febuary, I asked the same teacher if it would be possible to sit GCSE religious studies earlier than the rest of my year group (at the time, I was not aware how little time that would give me to learn two years of content). This was mainly with the intention of getting to A levels faster. After a few days they decided as a department that they were unable to allow me to do it, and told me that I was better off sticking to the normal pace.

However, last week, my teacher came to me asking for a list of the topics I have looked at in the A level curriculum, and he said that they are going to reconsider moving me either a year or two up. Since I am in year 9, and the change would be in the coming September, the jump would either be to year 11 (like I originally asked for) or year 12, which is obviously the beginning of the A level philosophy course. He will test me after my internal exams, which are 2 weeks after I come back from the holidays.

So far, I have attempted an essay, and have recently just sent off my second attempt for him to look at, and I have been looking at the mark schemes so I know what kind of questions I will be faced with when my teacher sends them to me. Is there anything else that I could do to possibly increase the likelihood of being moved up to A level/maybe speed up the decision? I know this doesn't sound like a good situation, especially given my track record, but it really isn't as bad as it sounds..
0
reply
TSR Jessica
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 week ago
#2
Sorry you've not had any responses about this. Are you sure you've posted in the right place? Here's a link to our subject forum which should help get you more responses if you post there.
0
reply
Compost
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 week ago
#3
I don't understand how this would work if you are remaining with your year group for everything else. School generally only have 2-3 (or 1 at my school) lessons a week for GCSE RE whereas it's more likely to be 6 for studying A level. They also aren't likely to happen at the same time as your RE lesson so you'd have to miss miscellaneous other lessons to attend.

Also, are you hoping to study Philosophy A level or Religious Studies (Philosophy and Ethics)? they are 2 different A levels

Reading round the subject is great in prepartion for studying the A level later or just for general interest but I'm not sure what you'd gain by trying to do what you're suggesting
0
reply
sqiddy747
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 1 week ago
#4
In terms of timetabling, I know it is possible; this isn't the first time for my school to do this. I have friends who have taken maths, languages and music in the years that I hope to take philosophy. If its necessary, I am most than ready to drop a subject to compensate, and know exactly what it would be (music). If scheduled correctly, they will probably overlap with a subject from my year group. It shouldn't matter what lesson, seeing as I wouldn't be doing the GCSE course. If I recall correctly, GCSEs have 4 doubles for each subject, and then A levels have 6. From what I understand, I might simply just not have the timetabled free periods.

I am aware of the difference, from what I know it is philosophy, not RS.

By doing this, I would be completely skipping the GCSE. I will have 8 or 9 GCSEs depending on whether I need to drop a subject, but an extra A level. Since I would basically finish the A level at the same time as GCSE, I will continue as normal from yr 12-13 picking 3-4. Ideally the outcome would be 9 GCSEs (the recommended average for my school) and 5 A levels (2 above).
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Would you consider Adjustment if your grades were higher than you expected?

Yes, I'd look at higher ranking universities than my current choices (172)
41.85%
Yes, I'd look for a course or uni that is a better fit for me (61)
14.84%
No, I'd stick with my current uni choice (170)
41.36%
Something else (let us know in the thread below!) (8)
1.95%

Watched Threads

View All