UKJ
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Hii,
When writing essays, how many scholars are we mean to include for it to be an extensive range? Is three or four enough?
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Joe312
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(Original post by UKJ)
Hii,
When writing essays, how many scholars are we mean to include for it to be an extensive range? Is three or four enough?
Is this for the OCR exam board?

If so, it kinda depends on the topic. The Plato & Aristotle topic won't need a lot of scholars. If I had to give general advice, I would go for a minimum of three but four would be safe. You have to actually use the scholar too, not just name drop them.

Honestly this is not something that matters much, your teacher shouldn't make 'too' big a deal out of it.
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UKJ
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(Original post by Joe312)
Is this for the OCR exam board?

If so, it kinda depends on the topic. The Plato & Aristotle topic won't need a lot of scholars. If I had to give general advice, I would go for a minimum of three but four would be safe. You have to actually use the scholar too, not just name drop them.

Honestly this is not something that matters much, your teacher shouldn't make 'too' big a deal out of it
Yes it's for the OCR exam board.

Yh, my teachers didn't say much about reference to scholars or number of quotes to include. It was only when I looked at the mark scheme and it said extensive range so I was confused about what it meant by 'extensive'.
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Joe312
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(Original post by UKJ)
Yes it's for the OCR exam board.

Yh, my teachers didn't say much about reference to scholars or number of quotes to include. It was only when I looked at the mark scheme and it said extensive range so I was confused about what it meant by 'extensive'.
I'm an examiner for OCR and when I did the training they told me that the number of scholars criteria in the mark scheme is not as important as the other criteria like the depth/breadth of your AO1 knowledge, the degree to which your claims are justified, the clarity/skillfulness of your writing and the evaluation of different points of view.
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UKJ
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(Original post by Joe312)
I'm an examiner for OCR and when I did the training they told me that the number of scholars criteria in the mark scheme is not as important as the other criteria like the depth/breadth of your AO1 knowledge, the degree to which your claims are justified, the clarity/skillfulness of your writing and the evaluation of different points of view.
Thank you!! So could you say that you look at how well an argument is structured and whether it is answering a question?
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Joe312
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(Original post by UKJ)
Thank you!! So could you say that you look at how well an argument is structured and whether it is answering a question?
Yes, but there is also the crucial criteria of how detailed and accurate the AO1 knowledge and AO2 evaluation is.
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UKJ
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(Original post by Joe312)
Yes, but there is also the crucial criteria of how detailed and accurate the AO1 knowledge and AO2 evaluation is.
Do you have any advice on how to practice evaluating?
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Joe312
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(Original post by UKJ)
Do you have any advice on how to practice evaluating?
The best way to evaluate is to do a paragraph like this:

Part 1: AO1 explanation of a theory/scholar/argument.
Part 2: AO2 criticism of whatever you explained in part 1.
Part 3: AO2 defence of the criticism (optional step).

At this point you will have mentioned two sides of a debate.

Part 4: AO2 Your judgement as to which side of the debate wins and why.
Part 5: link back to the question.
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UKJ
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(Original post by Joe312)
The best way to evaluate is to do a paragraph like this:

Part 1: AO1 explanation of a theory/scholar/argument.
Part 2: AO2 criticism of whatever you explained in part 1.
Part 3: AO2 defence of the criticism (optional step).

At this point you will have mentioned two sides of a debate.

Part 4: AO2 Your judgement as to which side of the debate wins and why.
Part 5: link back to the question.
Thank you, this is really helpful. Sorry to bother but I also want to ask about the importance of conclusions and introductions, as in how long should they be? I have seen suggestions but under timed conditions it is difficult to write a good intro/conclusion.
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(Original post by UKJ)
Thank you, this is really helpful. Sorry to bother but I also want to ask about the importance of conclusions and introductions, as in how long should they be? I have seen suggestions but under timed conditions it is difficult to write a good intro/conclusion.
Intros should go like this:

1 - what the general topic is about (1 sentence)
2 - what debate/issue the particular question is asking about (1 sentence)
3 - what/who is on each side of the debate (1-2 sentences)
4 - what you are going to argue (1 sentence)

Conclusions should go like this:

Because conclusion X was reached in paragraph 1, conclusion Y was reached in paragraph 2, conclusion Z was reached in paragraph 3, my overall conclusion and answer to the question is...

Basically, conclusions should sum up the evaluative mini-conclusions or final judgements that you reach in each paragraph on the debate/issue you evaluated in each paragraph. Your final conclusion should follow logically from that.

I'm making a website with revision notes that put the content into essay format for you. You can find it here: https://alevelphilosophyandreligion.com/

Check the website again after the summer though because it's going to be massively improved.
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UKJ
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(Original post by Joe312)
Intros should go like this:

1 - what the general topic is about (1 sentence)
2 - what debate/issue the particular question is asking about (1 sentence)
3 - what/who is on each side of the debate (1-2 sentences)
4 - what you are going to argue (1 sentence)

Conclusions should go like this:

Because conclusion X was reached in paragraph 1, conclusion Y was reached in paragraph 2, conclusion Z was reached in paragraph 3, my overall conclusion and answer to the question is...

Basically, conclusions should sum up the evaluative mini-conclusions or final judgements that you reach in each paragraph on the debate/issue you evaluated in each paragraph. Your final conclusion should follow logically from that.

I'm making a website with revision notes that put the content into essay format for you. You can find it here: https://alevelphilosophyandreligion.com/

Check the website again after the summer though because it's going to be massively improved.
Thank you!!
I've struggled with exam technique and it makes sense now. I just checked the website, it's really clear. I also struggled in understanding Ethical theories so I'm going to use the ppt that you created. But I'll be checking the website again and show it to my friends.
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