Mcmetea
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So I saw someone else ask about this and thought I’d see if anyone has some good advice for me. I got rejected for veterinary medicine this year and decided to do a undergrad degree instead of taking a gap year for personal reasons. But I’m not sure which one to pick. I’m not bothered about location and I may potentially get offers for both courses. Applied medical sciences is more interesting to me but I’m not sure whether I’ll be able to easily do postgrad vet med with it. Can anyone help me decide?
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Miss_mischy
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I would suggest, if you are keen on postgraduate studies, to find the course you would apply to in the future and check their entry requirements. There, the universities list the subjects and often say you'd need at least a 2:1 in your BA/Bsc.

I would guess(!) that biochemistry would be a better choice because Applied Medical Sciences (depending on the universities) focus primarily on humans. Biochemistry is often studied in the latter as well, plus, it gives you the basics that (an educated guess here) you would need for vet med. I'd suggest you compare the modules that you would have studied in the veterinary medicine degree and compare those to biochemistry and applied medical sciences. Probably best then to pick the one that overlaps the most (which will probably be biochem).

The entrance requirements for graduate entry to vet med at the a) Univeristy of Edinburgh are a 2:1 in a biological/animal science. "Subjects studied MUST include Biology/Zoology, Physics, Biochemistry, Organic and Inorganic Chemistry and Mathematics/Statistics.

b) Bristol accepts "Applied Anatomy; Biochemistry; Biology; Biomedical Science; Cancer Biology and Immunology; Cellular and Molecular Medicine; Chemistry; Medical Microbiology; Neuroscience; Pharmacology; Physics; Physiological Science; Veterinary Nursing and Bioveterinary Science; Veterinary Nursing and Companion Animal Behaviour (from 2022); Virology and Immunology; and Zoology".

Seems as if there are only three graduate entry programs in the UK, so you might have to apply for a second undergraduate degree.

If you do the steps I've outlined above, you should get a clearer idea which option works best for you.

Let me know what you have decided to do at the end.
Last edited by Miss_mischy; 5 months ago
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Mcmetea
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(Original post by Miss_mischy)
I would suggest, if you are keen on postgraduate studies, to find the course you would apply to in the future and check their entry requirements. There, the universities list the subjects and often say you'd need at least a 2:1 in your BA/Bsc.

I would guess(!) that biochemistry would be a better choice because Applied Medical Sciences (depending on the universities) focus primarily on humans. Biochemistry is often studied in the latter as well, plus, it gives you the basics that (an educated guess here) you would need for vet med. I'd suggest you compare the modules that you would have studied in the veterinary medicine degree and compare those to biochemistry and applied medical sciences. Probably best then to pick the one that overlaps the most (which will probably be biochem).

The entrance requirements for graduate entry to vet med at the a) Univeristy of Edinburgh are a 2:1 in a biological/animal science. "Subjects studied MUST include Biology/Zoology, Physics, Biochemistry, Organic and Inorganic Chemistry and Mathematics/Statistics.

b) Bristol accepts "Applied Anatomy; Biochemistry; Biology; Biomedical Science; Cancer Biology and Immunology; Cellular and Molecular Medicine; Chemistry; Medical Microbiology; Neuroscience; Pharmacology; Physics; Physiological Science; Veterinary Nursing and Bioveterinary Science; Veterinary Nursing and Companion Animal Behaviour (from 2022); Virology and Immunology; and Zoology".

Seems as if there are only three graduate entry programs in the UK, so you might have to apply for a second undergraduate degree.

If you do the steps I've outlined above, you should get a clearer idea which option works best for you.

Let me know what you have decided to do at the end.
Thank you so much for all the effort you put into that! I think I’ll firm biochemistry then thanks!!
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McGinger
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Just be aware that Graduate Vet Med is very competitive - and expensive, as there is no entitlement to SF funding.
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Mcmetea
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(Original post by McGinger)
Just be aware that Graduate Vet Med is very competitive - and expensive, as there is no entitlement to SF funding.
Yeah I’m aware
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mike23mike
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if you want to get into vet school after your undergrad then pick a more relevant degree. Looking at the Royal Veterinary College London I see BSc Biovetinary Sciences, BSc Animal Biology, Behaviour, Welfare and Ethics, BSc Biological Sciences (Wildlife Health Sciences).

London has a high cost of living but Liverpool, Surrey & Glasgow all offer similar courses and all have vet schools. I think it's better to do a subject directly related to vet science rather than biochem which is one step removed. Will a biochem degree where your dissertation was looking at drug metabolism in humans really give you something to talk about when interviewing for Vet School in 3 years time?
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Nessie162
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I did biochemistry and I absolutely recommend it. My degree was a part of the biomedical school so we did some biomed stuff too.
The biomed stuff is very human focused. Biochemistry is more universal.
You do biochemistry at vet school in your preclinical years (depends on the uni when exactly) and having that knowledge prior was very useful to me.
I would also recommend picking microbiology as one of your modules if you ever get a choice.

I transferred from Zoology, you'd guess that would be more relevant, and I guess it depends on the university, but at mine it was very focused on conservation and statistics, stuff that isn't very useful in vet med unless you specifically work in that field and I found it quite boring. This is why I decided to transfer to biochem and I'm glad I did.
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McGinger
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Or you could look at this degree : https://www.rvc.ac.uk/study/undergra...inary-sciences
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Mcmetea
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(Original post by Nessie162)
I did biochemistry and I absolutely recommend it. My degree was a part of the biomedical school so we did some biomed stuff too.
The biomed stuff is very human focused. Biochemistry is more universal.
You do biochemistry at vet school in your preclinical years (depends on the uni when exactly) and having that knowledge prior was very useful to me.
I would also recommend picking microbiology as one of your modules if you ever get a choice.

I transferred from Zoology, you'd guess that would be more relevant, and I guess it depends on the university, but at mine it was very focused on conservation and statistics, stuff that isn't very useful in vet med unless you specifically work in that field and I found it quite boring. This is why I decided to transfer to biochem and I'm glad I did.
Thanks so much that’s really helpful
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fatimalatif806
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(Original post by Nessie162)
I did biochemistry and I absolutely recommend it. My degree was a part of the biomedical school so we did some biomed stuff too.
The biomed stuff is very human focused. Biochemistry is more universal.
You do biochemistry at vet school in your preclinical years (depends on the uni when exactly) and having that knowledge prior was very useful to me.
I would also recommend picking microbiology as one of your modules if you ever get a choice.

I transferred from Zoology, you'd guess that would be more relevant, and I guess it depends on the university, but at mine it was very focused on conservation and statistics, stuff that isn't very useful in vet med unless you specifically work in that field and I found it quite boring. This is why I decided to transfer to biochem and I'm glad I did.
i applied to study an Msci in biochemsitry this year also. Would you be able to give me some info about job prospects and what most people go into after uni? What does the pay look like?
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Nessie162
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(Original post by fatimalatif806)
i applied to study an Msci in biochemsitry this year also. Would you be able to give me some info about job prospects and what most people go into after uni? What does the pay look like?
So before I got into vet school I was looking for lab jobs and I have to say it was quite difficult to find anything, but I'm fully to blame. I have had a few interviews with the NHS as a lab assistant, £18-20k jobs and I was rejected from all off them due to the lack of experience. Ended up working at a pharmacy at a minimum wage for a while.
You can also apply to NHS Scientist Training Programme which has a higher starting salary of £25-35k but it's extremely competitive.
Another option is working as a research assistant at an university but most of them also require some experience.
I think it's absolutely worth doing a summer internship or just work experience at a lab during your degree, just so you can put something lab related on your CV (other than your degree and final year project). Taking a year in industry placement would be ideal if your university offers it. I did none of that as I knew I only ever wanted to be a vet so I thought this stuff would be a waste of time but it came to bite me in the bum when I needed a job.
There are also many grad schemes that take graduates with any degree, so if you don't want to work in a lab it's also a great option. Then of course you also have the option of doing post grad training in something and here are just a few examples:
- Physicians Associate (GP like work)
- Perfusion Science (working as a part of the open-heart surgery team)
- Graduate Entry Medicine/Vet Med/Law
- Teaching
etc. etc.

If I didn't go to vet school I would've stayed in academia and went on to do a masters in drug development which I had a place for, then a phd and eventually university work.
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