what is the difference between philosophy logic and the scientific method at LSE...

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nooneeee
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compared to a regular philosophy undergrad at UCL/KCL ?
I know this might sound like a dumb question, but I'm trying to fully understand all the differences and was wondering if any philosophy students could help.
I see that in the LSE website, they still mention all the branches of philosophy just like for UCL/kings, and LSE definitely emphasise the role of philosophical applications in real life to be key, but just how much will LSE focus on philosophy of science compared to UCL/kings? Will they still teach political philosophy?
Appreciate any help along side me figuring this out for myself as I am researching this right now!
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MatthewAteYou
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So, having a look it seems that the LSE course has a real focus on analytic philosophy - especially that of logic and the philosophy of science. You can look through the module list and course structure to get the best idea.

Other philosophy degrees will probably mix, or allow you to choose more, between analytic and continental philosophical traditions. Again, your best best is to a) look through the module lists and/or b) message the university department directly and ask!
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nooneeee
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(Original post by EricAteYou)
So, having a look it seems that the LSE course has a real focus on analytic philosophy - especially that of logic and the philosophy of science. You can look through the module list and course structure to get the best idea.

Other philosophy degrees will probably mix, or allow you to choose more, between analytic and continental philosophical traditions. Again, your best best is to a) look through the module lists and/or b) message the university department directly and ask!
thank you!!
yea, that was the conclusion I came to too, and now I'm not sure how to tell if I'll enjoy analytic philosophy- tbh the only reason I looked into this course is more bcos I'd love to study at LSE (campus-feel, location, prestige and more job security to if I did philo at kings) rather than the specifics of the course which might be a mistake, especially with how LSE seems a lot more serious with workload...
However I do like the emphasis on how LSE want to use philosophy in a way that relates and applies as directly as possible to the real world.
I'll definitely check out some websites that outline modules clearly and weight it all out, so thank you for that again
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Zhaoji Xu
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I got offered admission to this program in March, but I am not sure about studying philosophy either. Quite enjoyed reading philosophy in spare time but can't really tell if I am going to like studying the discipline academically...
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MatthewAteYou
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(Original post by nooneeee)
thank you!!
yea, that was the conclusion I came to too, and now I'm not sure how to tell if I'll enjoy analytic philosophy- tbh the only reason I looked into this course is more bcos I'd love to study at LSE (campus-feel, location, prestige and more job security to if I did philo at kings) rather than the specifics of the course which might be a mistake, especially with how LSE seems a lot more serious with workload...
However I do like the emphasis on how LSE want to use philosophy in a way that relates and applies as directly as possible to the real world.
I'll definitely check out some websites that outline modules clearly and weight it all out, so thank you for that again
The university can be equally important to the course! So, makes sense!

My advice would be to do some reading around different philosophical traditions, there are great introductory textbooks and YouTube videos. It's worth saying that lots of continental philosophy does apply to the real world too, and equally you can find analytic traditions that seem very 'philosophical'.

(Original post by Zhaoji Xu)
I got offered admission to this program in March, but I am not sure about studying philosophy either. Quite enjoyed reading philosophy in spare time but can't really tell if I am going to like studying the discipline academically...
I definitely found this when I applied, having not studied philosophy before. I found at university the skills and the way you approach problems is quite different. Luckily, I ended up really enjoying it!
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