Is this a good way to study?

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Googley_eyes
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I find a useful way of studying for me is to read a paragraph or something (I study biology so like a process or something) and say it to myself until I remember it.

Then I do a few more things like this and turn each individual thing into a question. E.g. learning a few things about interphase chromosomes then answering questions like ‘What is Heterochromatin’ and I write what is it and where it’s found as the answer.

So I read, try to remember, repeat with other things, go back and try to be able to write them all down, correct mistakes and repeat if needed or move on.

Idk if that makes sense or is rambly. But for those who understood it (lol) does this seem like an active and good way to study, and where can I make improvements?

Thank you!
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CaptainDuckie
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You’re missing one thing: past paper questions.

You can repeat the same sentence 150 times but if you can’t apply all this to questions, you have effectively wasted your time.
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BohemianPhysics
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Test yourself periodically on things you've covered in this way to see if you're remembering for the long-term. Do this in between revising new topics too. Make the gaps longer between testing the same topic. Anything you've forgotten should be redone eg. for 8 topics : topic 1, 2, 3, 4, rep1, 5, rep 2 6, rep 3, 7, rep 4, 8, rep 1, rep 5, rep 2, rep 6, rep 3, rep 7, rep 4, rep 8, etc.

the forgetting curve of retention explains this theory https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forgetting_curve

Also, do past paper questions

Test each other in a group if possible
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University of Strathclyde Student Ambassador
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(Original post by Googley_eyes)
I find a useful way of studying for me is to read a paragraph or something (I study biology so like a process or something) and say it to myself until I remember it.

Then I do a few more things like this and turn each individual thing into a question. E.g. learning a few things about interphase chromosomes then answering questions like ‘What is Heterochromatin’ and I write what is it and where it’s found as the answer.

So I read, try to remember, repeat with other things, go back and try to be able to write them all down, correct mistakes and repeat if needed or move on.

Idk if that makes sense or is rambly. But for those who understood it (lol) does this seem like an active and good way to study, and where can I make improvements?

Thank you!
Hey Googley_eyes

I used to revise in a similar way for language subjects and rehearsed mini essays on different topics that would come up. For other subjects such as Chemistry and Biology, I found it useful to make notes then re-write them out again to help me remember what I had written. For History I would re-read the textbook over and over again and this helped me remember key information.

Everyone revises differently and as I’ve found in the past, using one revision method for one subject might not work for another so try and vary how you revise. As CaptainDuckie and BohemianPhysics mentioned, practice past papers. This way you’ll have an idea of the questions that could come up in the exam. If you can, email your teacher to see if they would be happy to give you feedback on your work after you attempt a few past papers.

Hope this helps

Melissa- Student Ambassador
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Googley_eyes
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(Original post by CaptainDuckie)
You’re missing one thing: past paper questions.

You can repeat the same sentence 150 times but if you can’t apply all this to questions, you have effectively wasted your time.
I don’t have access to any past papers
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Googley_eyes
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(Original post by BohemianPhysics)
Test yourself periodically on things you've covered in this way to see if you're remembering for the long-term. Do this in between revising new topics too. Make the gaps longer between testing the same topic. Anything you've forgotten should be redone eg. for 8 topics : topic 1, 2, 3, 4, rep1, 5, rep 2 6, rep 3, 7, rep 4, 8, rep 1, rep 5, rep 2, rep 6, rep 3, rep 7, rep 4, rep 8, etc.

the forgetting curve of retention explains this theory https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forgetting_curve

Also, do past paper questions

Test each other in a group if possible
Thank you. I have been reviewing things a bit like that but I’ll be more strict about it. I just find this faster than making a thousand flash card as I feel like I’m doing a similar thing, as I only read it once or twice and when I review, only read the question that I made.

I don’t have access to any past papers unfortunately.
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Googley_eyes
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(Original post by University of Strathclyde Student Ambassador)
Hey Googley_eyes

I used to revise in a similar way for language subjects and rehearsed mini essays on different topics that would come up. For other subjects such as Chemistry and Biology, I found it useful to make notes then re-write them out again to help me remember what I had written. For History I would re-read the textbook over and over again and this helped me remember key information.

Everyone revises differently and as I’ve found in the past, using one revision method for one subject might not work for another so try and vary how you revise. As CaptainDuckie and BohemianPhysics mentioned, practice past papers. This way you’ll have an idea of the questions that could come up in the exam. If you can, email your teacher to see if they would be happy to give you feedback on your work after you attempt a few past papers.

Hope this helps

Melissa- Student Ambassador
Thank you for your reply. I am doing a degree and all of my modules are very similar so I find one or two techniques currently work for them all but I’ll bear this in mind for a weird module next year. I used to do mind maps but found this never very helpful.

I don’t have access to any past papers unfortunately so I can’t use these, hence why I’m making my own questions.
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BohemianPhysics
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(Original post by Googley_eyes)
Thank you. I have been reviewing things a bit like that but I’ll be more strict about it. I just find this faster than making a thousand flash card as I feel like I’m doing a similar thing, as I only read it once or twice and when I review, only read the question that I made.

I don’t have access to any past papers unfortunately.
You didn't say this was uni revision. The same principle of repeated testing to aid memory is still relevant but the past paper situation is a bit different.

That's very weird. I thought all unis at least did past paper questions, even if no answers are provided. They should be on the uni website and accessible to students and teachers.

Could you ask anyone in the years above you what kind of questions may come up and how they're worded?

Go over any problem sheets and assignments you've had to do in workshops/ tutorials (ie classes other than your lectures) and see if you can remember how to tackle them

Go over the lecture notes and recordings to compile a comprehensive set of notes and try to narrow it down to revision notes.

Does the lecturer/ course leader have any advice regarding exams? You could try contacting them.
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CaptainDuckie
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(Original post by Googley_eyes)
I don’t have access to any past papers

How? What part of education are you in?
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Googley_eyes
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(Original post by CaptainDuckie)
How? What part of education are you in?
First year of uni.
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