Students at Aberdeen University vote for trigger warnings in lectures

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Uni_Student321
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From the Evening Express - https://www.eveningexpress.co.uk/fp/...s-in-lectures/

I don't agree with this. You can't just go through live avoiding everything that upsets you or you disagree with.

There will pbviously be some people that this will actually trigger, but maybe university isn't the best place for them? Or maybe pick a different course? Sort out the reason why you would get triggered first rather than forcing trigger warnings on everything.
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Joleee
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i'm just trying to imagine how this would work in practice. like, i can't imagine any subject needing it except maybe English literature because 99.9 percent of the time there are no surprises in your reading; you know what the subject is well in advance just from looking at the syllabus. you know if you study law you're going to come across rape cases and when. if you study a political subject on gender or the history of LGBTQ rights, you know you're going to come across homophobia and transphobia.

but i wouldn't get my panties in a bunch over this - students cannot avoid the material if it's required reading and no materials are being censored. all a trigger warning does in theory is give a heads up to someone who might get triggered cuz they themselves have encountered sexual abuse, or had suicidal thoughts, or drug or alcohol addiction. in theory it isn't a big deal. in practice tho trigger warnings have almost no effect on an individual. 'researchers found that trigger warnings actually slightly increased people’s self-reported anxiety—but only among people who believed that words can cause emotional damage. overall, the warnings had no significant effect.'

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.the...rticle/585871/

it's because if you have PTSD from sexual abuse, like myself, reading about it might piss you off, but what 'triggers' your panic and anxiety isn't that. 'triggering' occurs from daily encounters that you physically experience, such as being snuck up on or hearing the wrong conversation, that you didn't see coming and which brings you back to the moment you were traumatised. unfortunately, there can be no trigger warnings for that.
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Uni_Student321
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(Original post by Joleee)
i'm just trying to imagine how this would work in practice. like, i can't imagine any subject needing it except maybe English literature because 99.9 percent of the time there are no surprises in your reading; you know what the subject is well in advance just from looking at the syllabus. you know if you study law you're going to come across rape cases and when. if you study a political subject on gender or the history of LGBTQ rights, you know you're going to come across homophobia and transphobia.

but i wouldn't get my panties in a bunch over this - students cannot avoid the material if it's required reading and no materials are being censored. all a trigger warning does in theory is give a heads up to someone who might get triggered cuz they themselves have encountered sexual abuse, or had suicidal thoughts, or drug or alcohol addiction. in theory it isn't a big deal. in practice tho trigger warnings have almost no effect on an individual. 'researchers found that trigger warnings actually slightly increased people’s self-reported anxiety—but only among people who believed that words can cause emotional damage. overall, the warnings had no significant effect.'

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.the...rticle/585871/

it's because if you have PTSD from sexual abuse, like myself, reading about it might piss you off, but what 'triggers' your panic and anxiety isn't that. 'triggering' occurs from daily encounters that you physically experience, such as being snuck up on or hearing the wrong conversation, that you didn't see coming and which brings you back to the moment you were traumatised. unfortunately, there can be no trigger warnings for that.
Really good points. Trigger warning for me are something that people are just jumping onto because they are seen as "progressive" or whatever, despite them having very little impact for almost everyone.

I don't see why it would help. You can't miss out content just because it might trigger you. If I was doing a councelling course, I can't just miss out the parts about sexual abuse because I don't like it. There are basically no advantages for trigger warnings.
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yeetouttawindow
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animal abuse
racism
sexual abuse and harassment
suicide
drug and alcohol abuse
ableism
homophobia
transphobia

if these were in a film, TV, video game, music lyrics
they have a content warning on so its reasonable to have them in a university environment
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nexttime
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I suppose a quick warning where content might be unexpected is reasonable. Obviously its possible to take it too far - like a 'graphic image' warning at the beginning of a medical lecture for example - of course there's graphic images its a medical lecture! But if handled sensibly, doesn't seem a problem.
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Uni_Student321
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(Original post by yeetouttawindow)
animal abuse
racism
sexual abuse and harassment
suicide
drug and alcohol abuse
ableism
homophobia
transphobia

if these were in a film, TV, video game, music lyrics
they have a content warning on so its reasonable to have them in a university environment
But in a lot of films and TV shows etc. you might not expect those sort of things but you would likely expect things like homophobic views in a history degree. If I was doing a module on the Nazis, I wouldn't expect a trigger warning because it's pretty obvious what it is going to include whereas it often isn't clear with things like film titles.
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