Postgraduate Engineering Conversion Advice - 2021

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ripray
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I am interested in studying structural / civil engineering & would like to do this as an MSC conversion.

Unfortunately my background is mostly humanitarian but I currently work within a project managerial role.

Background:
- MFA Fine Art Media, Slade, UCL
- BFA Fine Art, Ruskin, University of Oxford
- Foundation Diploma, Oxford Brookes University
- A level Art, Maths, Physics (AAB)
- GCSE (5A*,4A)

1. Does anyone know of any foundation / conversion courses (e.g. UCL have a Civil Engineering Grad Diploma) that would be open to students not from BSC/BEng backgrounds?

2. If not, would the root be doing an undergraduate?

3. Alternatively, are there any courses that blend design/engineering that could be of interest.

Thank you! Any help would be greatly appreciated.
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Helloworld_95
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For Structural/Civil engineering I don't think it would be possible, you would really need a foundation in a numerate discipline at least, and the lack of availability of conversion courses for non-STEM grads seems to agree with that.

Doing another undergraduate is one route, although an apprenticeship, including degree apprenticeships, may be a better one.

Computer Science/Software Engineering and (Landscape) Architecture would be options for you as they are somewhat more lenient.
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MindMax2000
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(Original post by ripray)
I am interested in studying structural / civil engineering & would like to do this as an MSC conversion.

Unfortunately my background is mostly humanitarian but I currently work within a project managerial role.

Background:
- MFA Fine Art Media, Slade, UCL
- BFA Fine Art, Ruskin, University of Oxford
- Foundation Diploma, Oxford Brookes University
- A level Art, Maths, Physics (AAB)
- GCSE (5A*,4A)

1. Does anyone know of any foundation / conversion courses (e.g. UCL have a Civil Engineering Grad Diploma) that would be open to students not from BSC/BEng backgrounds?

2. If not, would the root be doing an undergraduate?

3. Alternatively, are there any courses that blend design/engineering that could be of interest.

Thank you! Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Does anyone know of any foundation / conversion courses (e.g. UCL have a Civil Engineering Grad Diploma) that would be open to students not from BSC/BEng backgrounds?
I've asked about to getting onto engineering master and grad diploma courses before, but they tend not to accept people who don't have the maths, physics, or quantitative science backgrounds.

If not, would the root be doing an undergraduate?
Your fine art degrees unfortunately fall under that category, so you wil have to do an undergraduate should you wish to get into engineering.

Alternatively, are there any courses that blend design/engineering that could be of interest.
There is something along the lines of industrial design and product design that you could look into. However, it's more of a design degree than an engineering degree. For example:
http://www.imperial.ac.uk/design-engineering/study/ide/
https://www.brunel.ac.uk/study/postg...uct-design-msc
From the looks of things, the above don't have any specific entry requirements that would invalidate your application should you wish to apply. However, you might want to check this yourself.
If I wanted to go into an engineering environment though, I'd rather do the engineering degree from scratch, and ideally doing a MEng.

You could alternatively go into architecture, which is of closer relations to your civil engineering interests. Unfortunately due to regulations, you're more than likely require to do the undergrad and postgrad degrees in order to qualify. See: https://nationalcareers.service.gov....iles/architect. The requirements for architecture degrees tend to be 3 very good A Levels (around the A grades). Given the choice, I'd rather go into civil engineering.

A Levels
Given your current qualifications and the time that has lapsed, it is very likely the universities will ask you to redo your A Levels (or do a suitable Level 3 qualification) again. For most universities, they have a time limit to how long the A Levels would be considered acceptable for applications (the time limit can range from 5 years to 2, depending on the university). The A Levels themselves don't have an expiry date though.
Should you need to in order to get onto an engineering course, I would either recommend doing the A Levels with an online college, or an engineering Access to HE course (offline or online). Should you wish to do the Access course, you would ideally want to check with the university department you wish to study at for their specific requirements for certain number of credits in certain subjects (usually at least 15 for maths), since Access courses can vary with the type of content they offer.
An alternative is to do a relevant BTEC at your local college, but they will require you to spend 2 years on the course. (The online A Levels and online and offline Access courses can be done in 1 year.) The other route would be a foundation year of a degree or a foundation degree. However, these costs of these degrees would be the same cost of one year at university, despite teaching similar material to the other Level 3 courses.
As you have already done A Levels before, you will likely require to pay for your Level 3 courses yourself. The only exception to this would be the foundation degrees, but they do cost roughly £9k to do. Should you wish to confirm, you can try to call Student Finance. (I would recommend calling before 9am or after 6pm, since they will be less busy during those times.)

You might also want to be aware of the ELQ policy where the government will no longer fund people for their second set of qualifications e.g. your second bachelor's and master's. You might want to factor in this before deciding on the course.
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ripray
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(Original post by Helloworld_95)
For Structural/Civil engineering I don't think it would be possible, you would really need a foundation in a numerate discipline at least, and the lack of availability of conversion courses for non-STEM grads seems to agree with that.

Doing another undergraduate is one route, although an apprenticeship, including degree apprenticeships, may be a better one.

Computer Science/Software Engineering and (Landscape) Architecture would be options for you as they are somewhat more lenient.
Thank you for your response @helloword_95.

I have considered the latter options you suggested which I understand are easier to get into later on as a 'career move'. Will look further into the apprenticeships.
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ripray
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(Original post by MindMax2000)
Does anyone know of any foundation / conversion courses (e.g. UCL have a Civil Engineering Grad Diploma) that would be open to students not from BSC/BEng backgrounds?
I've asked about to getting onto engineering master and grad diploma courses before, but they tend not to accept people who don't have the maths, physics, or quantitative science backgrounds.

If not, would the root be doing an undergraduate?
Your fine art degrees unfortunately fall under that category, so you wil have to do an undergraduate should you wish to get into engineering.

Alternatively, are there any courses that blend design/engineering that could be of interest.
There is something along the lines of industrial design and product design that you could look into. However, it's more of a design degree than an engineering degree. For example:
http://www.imperial.ac.uk/design-engineering/study/ide/
https://www.brunel.ac.uk/study/postg...uct-design-msc
From the looks of things, the above don't have any specific entry requirements that would invalidate your application should you wish to apply. However, you might want to check this yourself.
If I wanted to go into an engineering environment though, I'd rather do the engineering degree from scratch, and ideally doing a MEng.

You could alternatively go into architecture, which is of closer relations to your civil engineering interests. Unfortunately due to regulations, you're more than likely require to do the undergrad and postgrad degrees in order to qualify. See: https://nationalcareers.service.gov....iles/architect. The requirements for architecture degrees tend to be 3 very good A Levels (around the A grades). Given the choice, I'd rather go into civil engineering.

A Levels
Given your current qualifications and the time that has lapsed, it is very likely the universities will ask you to redo your A Levels (or do a suitable Level 3 qualification) again. For most universities, they have a time limit to how long the A Levels would be considered acceptable for applications (the time limit can range from 5 years to 2, depending on the university). The A Levels themselves don't have an expiry date though.
Should you need to in order to get onto an engineering course, I would either recommend doing the A Levels with an online college, or an engineering Access to HE course (offline or online). Should you wish to do the Access course, you would ideally want to check with the university department you wish to study at for their specific requirements for certain number of credits in certain subjects (usually at least 15 for maths), since Access courses can vary with the type of content they offer.
An alternative is to do a relevant BTEC at your local college, but they will require you to spend 2 years on the course. (The online A Levels and online and offline Access courses can be done in 1 year.) The other route would be a foundation year of a degree or a foundation degree. However, these costs of these degrees would be the same cost of one year at university, despite teaching similar material to the other Level 3 courses.
As you have already done A Levels before, you will likely require to pay for your Level 3 courses yourself. The only exception to this would be the foundation degrees, but they do cost roughly £9k to do. Should you wish to confirm, you can try to call Student Finance. (I would recommend calling before 9am or after 6pm, since they will be less busy during those times.)

You might also want to be aware of the ELQ policy where the government will no longer fund people for their second set of qualifications e.g. your second bachelor's and master's. You might want to factor in this before deciding on the course.
Thanks for your comprehensive response @mindmax2000. Very useful info.

I will look further into the aforementioned design courses. Re: Architecture, I was offered a place at Bath once upon a time. Things seem to come full circle.
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