eduorclinpsych
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I'm three years into teaching and feeling overwhelmed and miserable.

My school is amazing, I love the pupils, it's convenient to where I live etc. but the pandemic has just really thrown too big a spanner into the works that I can't just ignore it anymore.

In an attempt to not leave the profession all together/spend another year in lifeless misery, I've considered asking to go part-time. This way I would have the time to do a lot of the things I otherwise don't have the time to do (I literally just need one extra day).

I hear such awful things about going part-time but surely people must do it for a reason? Does anyone have any words of wisdom/advice?

Will I just end up doing the same amount of work but get paid less? Will I be less respected by pupils and staff alike as I wouldn't be as committed time wise?
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Krsto
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(Original post by eduorclinpsych)
I'm three years into teaching and feeling overwhelmed and miserable.

My school is amazing, I love the pupils, it's convenient to where I live etc. but the pandemic has just really thrown too big a spanner into the works that I can't just ignore it anymore.

In an attempt to not leave the profession all together/spend another year in lifeless misery, I've considered asking to go part-time. This way I would have the time to do a lot of the things I otherwise don't have the time to do (I literally just need one extra day).

I hear such awful things about going part-time but surely people must do it for a reason? Does anyone have any words of wisdom/advice?

Will I just end up doing the same amount of work but get paid less? Will I be less respected by pupils and staff alike as I wouldn't be as committed time wise?
You won’t be less respected at all I don’t think (some teachers were part time at my school). But you also have the summer break not long away, maybe that will provide the chance to relax that you need
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eduorclinpsych
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(Original post by Krsto)
You won’t be less respected at all I don’t think (some teachers were part time at my school). But you also have the summer break not long away, maybe that will provide the chance to relax that you need
Hi Krsto,

Thank you for your rapid response. I certainly don't see it this way but have heard comments here and there about it. I don't think I would be allowed one day off though as they would need to employ someone else to pick up the slack and one day wouldn't be enough to employ someone else.

I know, it's something I've thought about and what has made me hesitate handing in my notice before the May deadline. I found the three weeks between return and the Easter holiday unbelievably stressful and dreading to go back to that again.
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LiamWhiteRose
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I know you're worried that you couldn't just drop a day, but until you ask, you won't know. We've had people drop a day and the HoD has been able to work around the hours. If you have a supportive HoD/Head, they will try their best to accommodate you. There may be somebody else in the department/school who wants extra hours. If you ask, the worst they can say is no, then you can make a decision about whether to stay or not.
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HomerSimpson1
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(Original post by eduorclinpsych)
Hi Krsto,

Thank you for your rapid response. I certainly don't see it this way but have heard comments here and there about it. I don't think I would be allowed one day off though as they would need to employ someone else to pick up the slack and one day wouldn't be enough to employ someone else.

I know, it's something I've thought about and what has made me hesitate handing in my notice before the May deadline. I found the three weeks between return and the Easter holiday unbelievably stressful and dreading to go back to that again.
That is correct. The school needs to pick up the left over timetable. Also, it sends a message that part-time is acceptable. My first placement school now have a few part-time teachers (maths) and it was one of the reason I started to dislike mainstream teaching, because they moaned all the time.
Last edited by HomerSimpson1; 2 months ago
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eduorclinpsych
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(Original post by HomerSimpson1)
That is correct. The school needs to pick up the left over timetable. Also, it sends a message that part-time is acceptable. My first placement school now have a few part-time teachers (maths) and it was one of the reason I started to dislike mainstream teaching, because they moaned all the time.
Part-time is acceptable - we should encourage flexible working to accommodate parents/those with disabilities/carers and those with wider responsibilities.

Do you mean the part-timers moaned all the time? Or the school moaned about part-timers?
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HomerSimpson1
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(Original post by eduorclinpsych)
Part-time is acceptable - we should encourage flexible working to accommodate parents/those with disabilities/carers and those with wider responsibilities.

Do you mean the part-timers moaned all the time? Or the school moaned about part-timers?
The staff moaned - they didn't like teaching, too much work and kids don't like maths. But, they wanted to go part-time because they didn't like teaching. If the school needs a workforce? When I was on my teacher training, part-time was deemed unacceptable, because, it is, after all a secondary mainstream teaching course. It was viewed that you cannot do the job trained to do. If that proposal was challenged it would even a concern. I really disagreed with the uni and the brutally of that view. But, looking back, and taking my bias out, I'd be with the uni. I went in a different direction since. So, my view was wrong. One of the best trainees on our course just left teaching for a new career. I am sure she could no longer bare the job. Secondary mainstream was not for me, I tried part-time and I didn't like the part-time, because I didn't like it for 3 days instead of 5. However, this is just my case.
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HomerSimpson1
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I will say, my first placement school, they didn't like teaching more than most schools. I think they did me a favour in someways.

When I was 3 days a week, I had no form class, and a few blank slots. I probably had 4 classes aday.
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LiamWhiteRose
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(Original post by HomerSimpson1)
That is correct. The school needs to pick up the left over timetable. Also, it sends a message that part-time is acceptable. My first placement school now have a few part-time teachers (maths) and it was one of the reason I started to dislike mainstream teaching, because they moaned all the time.
And why is sending a message that part-time is acceptable a bad thing? It means that many teachers can balance their personal and professional lives, rather than losing good and experienced teachers.
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HomerSimpson1
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(Original post by LiamWhiteRose)
And why is sending a message that part-time is acceptable a bad thing? It means that many teachers can balance their personal and professional lives, rather than losing good and experienced teachers.
Because all of the government guidance (ITT and NQT guidence / legislation) is worded for full-time. I am now looking to board, just took a different option. Because, I do not like mainstream. All I'm saying is, is it really part-time, or the job itself.
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LiamWhiteRose
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ITT and NQT guidance shouldn't dictate what hours somebody can work. The best teachers I have known have been part-time. They did it so they could raise families, not because they don't like teaching.
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HomerSimpson1
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(Original post by LiamWhiteRose)
ITT and NQT guidance shouldn't dictate what hours somebody can work. The best teachers I have known have been part-time. They did it so they could raise families, not because they don't like teaching.
I agree, but the expectation is full-time.
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TheMcSame
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(Original post by eduorclinpsych)
I'm three years into teaching and feeling overwhelmed and miserable.

My school is amazing, I love the pupils, it's convenient to where I live etc. but the pandemic has just really thrown too big a spanner into the works that I can't just ignore it anymore.
I mean, it sounds like you're getting fed up of the job to me and you're using certain aspects of it to justify staying.

In an attempt to not leave the profession all together/spend another year in lifeless misery, I've considered asking to go part-time. This way I would have the time to do a lot of the things I otherwise don't have the time to do (I literally just need one extra day).
Could you not try and ask for a reduction of hours to get that extra day rather than cutting it right down to part time? Granted, I think knocking a day off would still be considered part time, but I feel like part time carries a sort of "I only want to work 2 or 3 days a week" sort of feeling with it.
I hear such awful things about going part-time but surely people must do it for a reason? Does anyone have any words of wisdom/advice?
Generally, it's relates to wanting more time for things like childcare, or struggling to find a full time position, so instead they opt for multiple part time jobs. Some people do it out of laziness as well... My Ex's mum was that sort, last I heard they were struggling to afford to keep living where they do and her mum wasn't planning on going full time and would rather the hassle of selling and moving house.

But yeah, a lot of the time part time seems to be 'you have X hours minimum, but we fully expect you to work significantly more hours'. But that does tend to be more on the side of retail and whatnot.

Will I just end up doing the same amount of work but get paid less? Will I be less respected by pupils and staff alike as I wouldn't be as committed time wise?
If you're on the same wage? No. You'll get paid the same unless there's some sort of difference with overtime pay. Also, you'd be contacted for X amount of hours, you have no obligation to do more than your contracted hours.
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HomerSimpson1
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I will tell you what I do think, I would just ask, because I witnessed people who put their foot down and I had soo much respect for them. I am more like that now.
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LiamWhiteRose
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(Original post by HomerSimpson1)
I agree, but the expectation is full-time.
I'd disagree. I'm in a department of over 20 and only six of us are full-time. Even one of the TLRs is part-time.
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HomerSimpson1
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(Original post by LiamWhiteRose)
I'd disagree. I'm in a department of over 20 and only six of us are full-time. Even one of the TLRs is part-time.
You can disagree with me, it is government legislation. NQT is two years next year. Someone part-time will be there forever, trust me, I never did a NQT year and wanted to to it part-time. I'd be wasting my time.

Once you have been teaching for a while, yes.

I was really struggling in my second teaching placement. I was going to suggest if I can complete NQT part-time. It was looked down on, because the University run a PGCE, for which is a full-time teaching course. See, that falls under capabilities. Now followed by a two-year induction. That is the expectation for teacher trainer providers, to prepare to teach full-time. I disagree by the way also, but you are arguing with government guidance not me.

I think in time there will be a revamp of the qualifications anyway.
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LiamWhiteRose
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There are, however, part-time teacher training courses. Nowhere does the government legislate that you must work full-time. Nowhere. Yes, the ECT will mean that if it is complete part-time, it will take much longer, but that doesn't mean it is necessary to do so full-time.

Also, the original poster isn't a trainee or NQT, so this won't affect them. Nobody will look down on them for going part-time.
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HomerSimpson1
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(Original post by LiamWhiteRose)
There are, however, part-time teacher training courses. Nowhere does the government legislate that you must work full-time. Nowhere. Yes, the ECT will mean that if it is complete part-time, it will take much longer, but that doesn't mean it is necessary to do so full-time.

Also, the original poster isn't a trainee or NQT, so this won't affect them. Nobody will look down on them for going part-time.
Yes ask... because once experienced they will consider. But it sounds like the job? I had this, you may have missed what I said, I went into another area of teaching... because it took me a while to realise it was the setting I trained in that I didn't like.
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bwilliams
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(Original post by eduorclinpsych)
Will I just end up doing the same amount of work but get paid less?
Yes - you will end up working on your day off.
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HomerSimpson1
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I think you missed my point. In my first placement school, the staff (again maths) went part-time because they didn't like the job. Nothing to do with family etc.

However, my second placement liked it. I also hated mainstream.

Once you realise what you like, you won't be miserable.
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