chw.prudence
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I got an offer from the university of Plymouth today for Biomedical Sciences, and I want to do it. However my parents don't think it's an employable degree and are highly against it, they didn't even want me to apply. Instead they want me to to do Social Work or Medicine, one of which I would not be happy doing, and the other I am not qualified for. How can I convince them that Biomedical Sciences is a good degree?

For further information; I will not be able to move down to Plymouth myself without their support.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by chw.prudence)
I got an offer from the university of Plymouth today for Biomedical Sciences, and I want to do it. However my parents don't think it's an employable degree and are highly against it, they didn't even want me to apply. Instead they want me to to do Social Work or Medicine, one of which I would not be happy doing, and the other I am not qualified for. How can I convince them that Biomedical Sciences is a good degree?

For further information; I will not be able to move down to Plymouth myself without their support.
What do they think is wrong with this degree? It's a great degree ...

https://www.ucas.com/ucas/after-gcse...ical-scientist
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Muttley79
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https://www.ucas.com/explore/subject...gical-sciences



There is a wide number of science-related careers you can enter with a biological science degree. Additionally, some careers require a relevant postgraduate qualification. The key areas of employment include:

healthcare – public and private
clinical research
pharmaceutics and biotechnology
environment and agriculture
education
scientific sales and marketing
technical media and journalism
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Kabzzzy
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Biomed and Med students will learn very similar things. The difference being that Med students will take those principles, and more, and apply it to clinical settings, whereas Biomed students take it further and go into lab research. In fact I'm pretty sure there are certain Universities where both students will share classes in, at least, the first year.
Medical research is never going to be unemployable, and there are so many other areas you could take that degree.

At this stage in your life, you can't really follow what your parents want. You're entering adulthood, and this is quite literally going to be your livelihood. You have to do something you will enjoy. Remind them that Medicine carries a lot of responsibility on people's lives, you're practically giving up your own life when you become a junior, and the pay isn't going to be much more than other healthcare professions starting off.
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chw.prudence
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(Original post by Kabzzzy)
Biomed and Med students will learn very similar things. The difference being that Med students will take those principles, and more, and apply it to clinical settings, whereas Biomed students take it further and go into lab research. In fact I'm pretty sure there are certain Universities where both students will share classes in, at least, the first year.
Medical research is never going to be unemployable, and there are so many other areas you could take that degree.

At this stage in your life, you can't really follow what your parents want. You're entering adulthood, and this is quite literally going to be your livelihood. You have to do something you will enjoy. Remind them that Medicine carries a lot of responsibility on people's lives, you're practically giving up your own life when you become a junior, and the pay isn't going to be much more than other healthcare professions starting off.
Thank you for the reply! I agree honestly, I do think I need to move independently and make my own choices, which is why I'm trying to get my case together to try and convince them. I don't think they can really stop me, but the support would really be appreciated. They're very convinced that Medicine is the end goal for me, but I disagree. I'll put more effort into communicating this to them.
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chw.prudence
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(Original post by Muttley79)
What do they think is wrong with this degree? It's a great degree ...

https://www.ucas.com/ucas/after-gcse...ical-scientist
They have a thousand horror stories about POC youth taking biomed and ending up in low-paying jobs or unemployed. Personally I think it's likely the people they're talking about didn't do their placement year during university and subsequently had issues. Regardless, it's hard to convince people who've made up their minds already.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by chw.prudence)
They have a thousand horror stories about POC youth taking biomed and ending up in low-paying jobs or unemployed. Personally I think it's likely the people they're talking about didn't do their placement year during university and subsequently had issues. Regardless, it's hard to convince people who've made up their minds already.
A relative did this degree then a DPhil and now starting post-doc
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Kerzen
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(Original post by chw.prudence)
For further information; I will not be able to move down to Plymouth myself without their support.
How come?
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chw.prudence
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(Original post by Kerzen)
How come?
It's a bit embarrassing, but because of covid I'm out of a job and don't have enough savings to move down south myself, as I live way up north. If my parents were against it, I'd struggling getting to the university in the first place.
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Kerzen
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(Original post by chw.prudence)
It's a bit embarrassing, but because of covid I'm out of a job and don't have enough savings to move down south myself, as I live way up north. If my parents were against it, I'd struggling getting to the university in the first place.
Would you not be eligible for the normal funding?
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A Rolling Stone
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(Original post by chw.prudence)
I got an offer from the university of Plymouth today for Biomedical Sciences, and I want to do it. However my parents don't think it's an employable degree and are highly against it, they didn't even want me to apply. Instead they want me to to do Social Work or Medicine, one of which I would not be happy doing, and the other I am not qualified for. How can I convince them that Biomedical Sciences is a good degree?

For further information; I will not be able to move down to Plymouth myself without their support.
as someone who graduated with a similar degree (Biochemistry) i agree with your parents.

however the caveat to that is that the degree is just as employable as other subjects under the strict condition that you get lots of NON relevant work experience for your CV. even humble bar/retail work is really good.
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Kabzzzy
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(Original post by chw.prudence)
It's a bit embarrassing, but because of covid I'm out of a job and don't have enough savings to move down south myself, as I live way up north. If my parents were against it, I'd struggling getting to the university in the first place.
It's not embarrassing at all, it's a reality for a lot of people at the moment. Have you studied at University before? If you have, then I can imagine that does complicate things with tuition fees. But if you haven't, you're eligible to take student loans that will cover your tuition fees as well as a maintenance loan which should cover living costs.
I'm not sure what the situation is with Plymouth, but if you're living away from home in London, you can get up to £12k a year for maintenance. That easily covers rent and more. Anywhere out of London will be less, but only due to rent being lower too. Even as a mature student (myself) who has a degree, I'm eligible for the maintenance loan. So I would check that out, and you can also make an application to student finance England (SFE) to see what your entitlements could be.
Of course if your parents are setting you up with your own place and paying for your fees, then there's some conflict of interest there. But if you want to be independent, you do have those options!
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chw.prudence
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(Original post by Kabzzzy)
It's not embarrassing at all, it's a reality for a lot of people at the moment. Have you studied at University before? If you have, then I can imagine that does complicate things with tuition fees. But if you haven't, you're eligible to take student loans that will cover your tuition fees as well as a maintenance loan which should cover living costs.
I'm not sure what the situation is with Plymouth, but if you're living away from home in London, you can get up to £12k a year for maintenance. That easily covers rent and more. Anywhere out of London will be less, but only due to rent being lower too. Even as a mature student (myself) who has a degree, I'm eligible for the maintenance loan. So I would check that out, and you can also make an application to student finance England (SFE) to see what your entitlements could be.
Of course if your parents are setting you up with your own place and paying for your fees, then there's some conflict of interest there. But if you want to be independent, you do have those options!
I talked about student loans to my parents today, and it was like talking to a stone wall. I'm taking a 4 year course instead of a 3 year one, and they've decided that by doing this I'm gathering more debt I'll have to pay back. Due to the fact that I don't have a degree, so I'm entitled to student loans, I was under the impression that I'll be paying back the same amount regardless of how many years I do, due to the way the student finance scheme works. Is this correct?
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Kerzen
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(Original post by chw.prudence)
I talked about student loans to my parents today, and it was like talking to a stone wall. I'm taking a 4 year course instead of a 3 year one, and they've decided that by doing this I'm gathering more debt I'll have to pay back. Due to the fact that I don't have a degree, so I'm entitled to student loans, I was under the impression that I'll be paying back the same amount regardless of how many years I do, due to the way the student finance scheme works. Is this correct?
https://www.gov.uk/student-finance/n...7-5687d8fbb64a
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Kabzzzy
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(Original post by chw.prudence)
I talked about student loans to my parents today, and it was like talking to a stone wall. I'm taking a 4 year course instead of a 3 year one, and they've decided that by doing this I'm gathering more debt I'll have to pay back. Due to the fact that I don't have a degree, so I'm entitled to student loans, I was under the impression that I'll be paying back the same amount regardless of how many years I do, due to the way the student finance scheme works. Is this correct?
Well this is exciting, it's practically your ticket to independence!! So yes, they are right in that you will rack up more debt. An extra year is an extra year of tuition fees as well as maintenance. But the way it works is that you have to be earning over a certain threshold before you start making payments, and it's also capped at 9% of your monthly salary. So even if you have more debt, you'll still only pay that percentage, it's not like they'll start taking half your salary. You can also get enough maintenance loan that you can afford to move into halls, or even private/shared accommodation. You should have enough money left over to live on if you're smart with your budgeting, but of course you can also get a part time job while in your earlier years of Uni.

Personally, unless there's something holding you back, I would go down this route. You'll get to study what you want to, you can live independently and make all of your own decisions, and your employment prospects should be fine too. Regardless of what you decide, go to the page the person above linked and at least make an account and apply for financing. It can take up to 6 weeks but then you'll know for sure what your entitlements are. It'll make planning for the next few years a lot easier!
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Trufflebuggy
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In regard to biomedical science degrees in general, make sure they are accredited with the IBMS/HCPC so that you can use the degree to be a state registered Biomedical Scientist in the future if you desire... it is difficult to go down the route of top up modules to satisfy the powers that be, that your collective studies are good enough to be eligible for state registration.

As someone who's been a BMS for over 25years I love it, but it can be stressful and physically and mentally draining during a long overnight shift where you are the only BMS on duty, its not for the faint hearted and I'd say you need a very good mental attitude to life. (but this applies to many healthcare roles)

Have you considered a clinical scientist role? This is a linking role between the technical BMS's and the medical team, they are less on the bench than BMS but have a lot of technical knowledge, and have a more clinical aspect to the role as their name suggests. The route is via MSc on the Scientist Training programme (STP), and at a starting Band 7 in a trainee role its nothing to be sniffed at if your parents are worried at your earning potential in the future... I'm a band 7 BMS by the way and I don't grumble at my salary and potential pension at the end of the day.
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RegisteredBMS
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(Original post by Trufflebuggy)
In regard to biomedical science degrees in general, make sure they are accredited with the IBMS/HCPC so that you can use the degree to be a state registered Biomedical Scientist in the future if you desire... it is difficult to go down the route of top up modules to satisfy the powers that be, that your collective studies are good enough to be eligible for state registration.

As someone who's been a BMS for over 25years I love it, but it can be stressful and physically and mentally draining during a long overnight shift where you are the only BMS on duty, its not for the faint hearted and I'd say you need a very good mental attitude to life. (but this applies to many healthcare roles)

Have you considered a clinical scientist role? This is a linking role between the technical BMS's and the medical team, they are less on the bench than BMS but have a lot of technical knowledge, and have a more clinical aspect to the role as their name suggests. The route is via MSc on the Scientist Training programme (STP), and at a starting Band 7 in a trainee role its nothing to be sniffed at if your parents are worried at your earning potential in the future... I'm a band 7 BMS by the way and I don't grumble at my salary and potential pension at the end of the day.
Just a slight edit to this. STP Trainee's are at Band 6, as in, Band 6 whilst studying the STP. Still, absolutely not to be sniffed at. Earnings towards the end of the profession are significant.

One thing I'll add, NHS STP is extremely competitive, so be prepared if that's a route you want to go down.
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Altoni
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I'm a newly qualified BMS and have to say that I agree with your parents. They are quite right about a large number of young POC ending up in underpaid jobs, certainly from my own experiences.

The fact is the majority of Biomedical Science graduates will not have what is required for state registration - a certificate of competence by undertaking a training portfolio in the lab and an accredited degree. Most end up in band 2/3 roles working as medical laboratory assistants for a long time hoping to pick up that all elusive trainee position or just end up doing something different. You have to keep in mind that most universities either don't offer the integrated placement or have very few placements available. It can be a very competitive process in and of itself just to earn yourself an unpaid year of hard work.

I'm really fortunate in that I've managed to get onto the STP before I'll even get any use out of my Biomedical Scientist title, but I've worked in the lab for 2 years and see time and again how difficult it is for graduates to attain registration. There are better options available.
Last edited by Altoni; 1 month ago
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KLS73
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(Original post by chw.prudence)
I got an offer from the university of Plymouth today for Biomedical Sciences, and I want to do it. However my parents don't think it's an employable degree and are highly against it, they didn't even want me to apply. Instead they want me to to do Social Work or Medicine, one of which I would not be happy doing, and the other I am not qualified for. How can I convince them that Biomedical Sciences is a good degree?

For further information; I will not be able to move down to Plymouth myself without their support.
It's a fantastic degree and it can lead to medicine and dentistry. A recent news article said that vacancies have risen 68% due to covid and the need for biomed scientists in labs. Look into the course and try to chose a uni that is accredited by IBMS and Royal Society of Biology as you could then get direct entry to NHS roles.
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(Original post by KLS73)
It's a fantastic degree and it can lead to medicine and dentistry. A recent news article said that vacancies have risen 68% due to covid and the need for biomed scientists in labs. Look into the course and try to chose a uni that is accredited by IBMS and Royal Society of Biology as you could then get direct entry to NHS roles.
Accreditation by the RSB couldn't mean less if it tried.
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