Lula_Lavender
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I have been looking at a few degrees in this area and I cant decide what kind of degree I should go for...

Ecology.
Conservation.
Ecology and Wildlife Conservation.
Wildlife Ecology and Conservation.
Conservation Biology.
Ecology and Conservation Biology.

They are all so similar I cant workout what the real differences are. I don't know exactly what specific job I want to do with this degree I just know I am keen to work in/with Nature. Can anyone help with some clarifications? How on Earth do I decide between them?

All I've worked out is that I would not choose any of these in combination with Environmental Management.

I'm also stuck between studying a ecology/conservation degree and a heritage degree but i thought i could atleast narrow down my choices within each so i can then decide. I also cant decide wether to choose the OU or a brick uni. But one thing at a time.
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Hanathemedic
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Look at the course content for each course and uni to see which you'd enjoy most
Last edited by Hanathemedic; 1 month ago
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spikefriday13
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I have been looking at the exact same thing for a few months now, and it’s tiring working out the differences!!
Although the titles are similar, I’d look at the individual modules for each, and what they contain.

What would you prefer to get into?
Countryside management, ecology consultancy, env. policy and law, GIS, marine biology, research, lab-based?

They all have variations on course content, so I’d work out what kind of field you’d like to go into/where your interests lie, and go from there.
See which courses will cover what you need to learn - or a variety of areas, which will give you options.
Once I worked that out, I made a spreadsheet with a few narrowed down courses with all the module descriptions to compare (like the right nerd I am, but it’s worth it), and see which courses are lacking in certain areas.

It’s also worth seeing which are CIEEM accredited, as I was advised by an ecology consultant that this can be worth looking for if you want to get into the ecology surveying side of things.
But it’s not the end of the world, as I think you can pay to get individually accredited.
https://cieem.net/i-want-to-be/how-t...dited-degrees/

Not sure if you’re looking at ug/pg, but I’ve
I’d look at unis which also offer online degrees if you’re struggling to choose - I’ve found decent MSc courses at Edinburgh Napier, Edinburgh, SRUC, and a few other decent ones, so the OU isn’t your only option there.
As they can be practical fields you’re looking into, they sometimes offer options for distance with some onsite practical mixed in, which will help gain experience alongside volunteering/internships during the course

I hope that essay helps a bit XD
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Lula_Lavender
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Lol, a spreadsheet is totally up my alley. I had considered doing one actually.
I'm looking at UG. I think Ecological Consultancy is where my bag is at.

What and where have you studied/are studying?
I don't suppose you have any ideas about what the math content is like on an ecology degree, it is an area I struggle with.
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OxFossil
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(Original post by Lula_Lavender)
Lol, a spreadsheet is totally up my alley. I had considered doing one actually.
I'm looking at UG. I think Ecological Consultancy is where my bag is at.

What and where have you studied/are studying?
I don't suppose you have any ideas about what the math content is like on an ecology degree, it is an area I struggle with.
The differences between these degree *titles* is, in practice, nil - I mean, no potential employer is going to worry about which one you took. As spikefriday13 says, the thing to do is to check the course content to see which appeals to you. There is some maths in all of them, but it's basically statistics, and unavoidable (I think most people hate this!)

Ecological consultancy is a useful skill to have, as there is a steady market. But be aware this will generally involve additional courses (eg bat licenses) and the work itself is often a bit depressing, doing surveys before some bit of woodland or field system is trashed by roadbuilding or whatever.

Longer term, the most useful thing is to keep in touch with the practical policy field. Changes in land use policy, developing NGO networks, how different NGOs can work together etc etc. This is the real;ity of most conservation ecology work. It's rarely taught at UG level, so its something you will need to do on your own initative, by making an effort to talk with field workers, joining something like The Mammal Society, doing the odd bit of voluntary work etc. It will make you much more employable.
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