michaelpurnell40
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I'm sure this has been asked before but I am considering dropping out of work and starting a new career, starting with university and a degree. I am currently earning an ok wage but I do not enjoy my field and it has no real progression for the future. I have just turned 40 and I wonder if it is a bit late for me to do this, I haven't completed any full tome education for 20 odd years.
I should add the field I want to go into is computer programming or security which is where I have always wanted to work but you need a degree to access it.
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ecolier
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(Original post by michaelpurnell40)
... I have just turned 40 and I wonder if it is a bit late for me to do this, I haven't completed any full tome education for 20 odd years.
I should add the field I want to go into is where I have always wanted to work but you need a degree to access it.
It depends on what field, doesn't it?

If you wanted to be a Premier League footballer, or a world class tennis star, or an Olympic gold gymnast... it is indeed too late.

If you wanted to be a future Prime Minister, then it may not be.
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Kerzen
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(Original post by michaelpurnell40)
I'm sure this has been asked before but I am considering dropping out of work and starting a new career, starting with university and a degree. I am currently earning an ok wage but I do not enjoy my field and it has no real progression for the future. I have just turned 40 and I wonder if it is a bit late for me to do this, I haven't completed any full tome education for 20 odd years.
I should add the field I want to go into is where I have always wanted to work but you need a degree to access it.
Which field do you want to move in to?
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michaelpurnell40
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(Original post by ecolier)
It depends on what field, doesn't it?

If you wanted to be a Premier League footballer, or a world class tennis star, or an Olympic gold gymnast... it is indeed too late.

If you wanted to be a future Prime Minister, then it may not be.
computing specifically cyber security or programming
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michaelpurnell40
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computing specifically cyber security or programming
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ecolier
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(Original post by michaelpurnell40)
computing specifically cyber security or programming
In that case, I don't think it's too late in my opinion but I am not an expert in that area.

:goodluck:
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Kerzen
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(Original post by michaelpurnell40)
computing specifically cyber security or programming
Do you have the A Levels you need?
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2mb
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(Original post by ecolier)
In that case, I don't think it's too late in my opinion but I am not an expert in that area.

:goodluck:
ecolier would you ever have a career change
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ecolier
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(Original post by 2mb)
ecolier would you ever have a career change
I don't know, I'll tell you when I'm 40!
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Zarek
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If you can afford it I would go for it. You have still lots of working life ahead, a job you enjoy is the most important thing and there’ll never be a better time.
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McGinger
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Get in touch with the Mature Student Advisors at a couple of Universities and see what qualifications they would expect you to have.

Most Unis take a holistic approach to Mature applicants - your work experience and life experience will be taken into account, but they will probably want some evidence of 'recent study' to make sure you have current study skills, such as an OU short course or an Access to HE course. Each case is different and each University's policies will be slightly different.

A few suggestions :
Bristol : http://www.bristol.ac.uk/study/mature/
Manchester Met : https://www.mmu.ac.uk/study/undergra...ature-students
Sussex : https://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/under...ature-students
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FV75
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I was 41 when I started back at uni for a total career change, I'm 45 now and after 4 years of study have secured my first job in my new career starting in September. So it can totally be done!

One thing you will be asked a lot (by universities, and later on by prospective employers) is why you are changing careers so make sure you have a solid rationale for the change in direction and evidence of commitment to your new career such as attending CPD events/courses, learning relevant skills etc. And join a professional society as a student member, if there is one.

Good luck - happy to answer any questions!
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ajj2000
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What is your current career and how much do you earn doing it?
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HellomynameisNev
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Absolutely its doable and you should go for it - Look at it this way, you still have 25+ working years ahead of you, may as well spend it doing something you want to do. I'm 48 and doing my 2nd degree for a career change.

Just make sure to do your research first - what is required to get on your course, and what will be required once you start your course - so you're going in fully prepared and eyes wide open.
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joanneg76
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Hi, I reached my forties and wanted a career change too. I was earning ok but not great money in a job that I had lost all enthusiasm for. I also regretted not going into higher education when I was younger.
So I quit my job at 44 and started an access course. I’m about to start uni in September and, while I’m really nervous, i have no regrets. Like previous poster said, I probably have 25 years of working life ahead of me, at least now it’ll hopefully be in something I love.
Good luck 🍀
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DeeDee2021
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(Original post by joanneg76)
Hi, I reached my forties and wanted a career change too. I was earning ok but not great money in a job that I had lost all enthusiasm for. I also regretted not going into higher education when I was younger.
So I quit my job at 44 and started an access course. I’m about to start uni in September and, while I’m really nervous, i have no regrets. Like previous poster said, I probably have 25 years of working life ahead of me, at least now it’ll hopefully be in something I love.
Good luck 🍀
Thank you for sharing! Your bravery and confidence is inspirational.

I feel as long as your brain still has the capacity and appetite to learn, it is never too late!

Wish everyone the best in their endeavours!
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Kerzen
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(Original post by michaelpurnell40)
computing specifically cyber security or programming
You might find something of interest here once you have your degree:

https://www.gchq-careers.co.uk/
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k1tsun3
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You don't necessarily have to do a degree. And there is no age limitations on most apprenticeships, although deadlines have either already passed or are coming up very soon for Sept. I started to learn to code with CS50 on Edx, then freeCodeCamp, Codecademy and Udemy. Then there is Udacity as well. After 4 months of learning I took a helpdesk role with some development experience gained in the WordPress ecosystem. I'm now progressing through various apprenticeship applications, passing all of my coding tests so far. Once in, you can look to gain further experience in Cyber Security and progress in the that direction if you wish. I'm not looking at general Software Engineering apprenticeships.

For context, I was a secondary English teacher. After I had my son I tried to return and just couldn't. I had been looking to change careers before I got pregnant, but landed a role in a special school I enjoyed and stayed. However, after returning from maternity leave I was done - the lack of time, sleep deprivation and lack of flexibility meant I just couldn't continue. So at 37 I started to learning to code and got my first job with some coding (although limited to small projects using WP and PHP). At 39 I'm hoping to start an apprenticeship. Still waiting for confirmation, but the guy who conducted the final interview loved me and even said he'd love to have me on his team. So it's all doable.

With apprenticeships, you just have to have at least a C grade in English and Maths GCSE and not hold a STEM degree.
Sky does a Cyber Security one, but applications are closed. They are still accepting applications for DevOps in Brentwood and Osterly: https://careers.sky.com/earlycareers...prenticeships/
BlueCove via Makers Academy (London) has a software engineering one open until the 26th April with a July start (Anything Makers related will require you to complete the Ruby course on Codecademy): https://boards.greenhouse.io/bluecove/jobs/5189265002
Softwire are still accepting applications for their apprenticeship program (London): https://www.softwire.com/vacancy/app...are-developer/
ARM (Cambridge) are still accepting applications too - deadline is 30 April: https://careers.arm.com/category/app...4601/8158784/1

Those are just a few options. I don't know your location or how much coding experience you have, but that should help give you an idea. Even if you aren't ready to apply now, you could spend the year learning in your spare time and then apply next year. Makers Academy to offer regular apprenticeships, so you could sign up for email notifications. Right now the Bootcamp is remote. The opportunities available will depend on your location. Most of the bigger organizations do have opportunities up north, especially in Leeds and Manchester.

Hope this helps.
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Manchester Metropolitan University
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(Original post by michaelpurnell40)
I'm sure this has been asked before but I am considering dropping out of work and starting a new career, starting with university and a degree. I am currently earning an ok wage but I do not enjoy my field and it has no real progression for the future. I have just turned 40 and I wonder if it is a bit late for me to do this, I haven't completed any full tome education for 20 odd years.
I should add the field I want to go into is computer programming or security which is where I have always wanted to work but you need a degree to access it.
Hi michaelpurnell40

Most universities will welcome Mature applicants and we would say you are never too old to go to university and take up a degree!

I have seen you are interested in studying BSc (Hons) Cyber Security which we do offer here at Manchester Met, you can find more information here: https://www.mmu.ac.uk/study/undergra...yber-security/

All our undergraduate courses have entry requirements – the qualifications you need to apply. These are often particular grades at GCSE and A-level (or equivalent). For some courses, you also need to have passed relevant subjects. For BSc(Hons) Cyber Security our entry requirements are 112-120 UCAS points which will require one relevant subject such as IT, computer science or mathematics. In addition, we require GCSE grade C/4 in English Language and Mathematics.

If you do not have the above qualifications you may want to consider an Access to HE Diploma in a relevant subject. We would advise that you look into an Access to Higher Education Diploma. This course is aimed at people who have been out of education for some time and wish to return to education and study a degree course. They are considered in place of Level 3 qualifications such as A levels or BTEC Diplomas. They are offered at most local further education colleges You can find further information on Access courses here: https://www.accesstohe.ac.uk/

For BSc(Hons) Cyber Secuirty we would require you to take the Access to Higher Education Diploma in either IT, computing or a science subject. You would need to achieve the grades required to meet the minimum UCAS point requirement for the course from the 45 credits at Level 3.If you would like to check what grades are required from your Access programme, please use the UCAS Tariff Point Calculator here: https://www.ucas.com/ucas/tariff-calculator

If you are aged 19 or over on the first day of the course you may apply for an Advanced Learning Loan to cover the cost of the access course fees www.gov.uk/advanced-learning-loans/overview If you go on to complete a HE course then you don’t have to pay the Advanced Learning Loan back. Please note that if you don't have GCSE English language and Mathematics at grade C or above, and these are required to meet our minimum entry requirements, then you will need to arrange to take these alongside your Access to HE Diploma.

I hope this helps a bit with your search!
Best of luck
Carly
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cececilxo
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My boyfriend works in IT, he has a very good job now and he never went to uni to do it. He has been doing it for about 7 years and manages people twice his age! Obviously you can also go to uni to do it but it isn't the be all and end all. If a change of career is something you want to do then you should definitely do it!! You only live once and it is best to try and live the life you want
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