How do I revise for english literature gcse?

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user6842344
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#1
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#1
so i am revising but do not know how to revise for english literature as i am in year 11 and have an upcoming exam for english literature in an Inspector calls for an essay but do not know how to revise or study for the exam as i am strugling really bad

how do I learn the quotes?
how do I get top marks for the essays?
Last edited by user6842344; 9 months ago
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username5256690
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#2
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#2
For poems I would make up an exam question, explode relevant quotes, write one example paragraph and highlight for each AO. I would then give myself 2 stars and a wish.
For quotes: write them on flashcards with prompts behind (eg. key Juliet quotes) then test yourself repeatedly.
Find some difficult exam questions online. You can write the whole essay or just plan what you would write.
Practise exploding quotes so you know how to improvise and do it in the exam.
Unseen poetry is just using practice questions.
If you want any other advice let me know. I took my exams in 2019

Also, for top marks CONTEXT! It's so important and really boosts up your marks
If you let me know what texts you're doing I might be able to offer more help
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englishhopeful98
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#3
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#3
hi
I agree with all of the above
also refer back to the question on a regular basis and match up quotes with key themes then you should be fine.
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daan.m
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#4
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#4
(Original post by user6842344)
so i am revising but do not know how to revise for english literature as i am in year 11 and have an upcoming exam for english literature in an Inspector calls for an essay but do not know how to revise or study for the exam as i am strugling really bad

how do I learn the quotes?
how do I get top marks for the essays?
I also had your problem for GCSE Eng Lit — I had no idea how to revise it.

I'd recommend:
1. Mind mapping using active recall: Go through each key character and theme (find a list somewhere or ask your teacher) and compile info you would write about them in an essay into a mind map, including quotations. Basically plan every possible essay out. Use an A3 sheet if u can to get more content on it. Then cover it up and try and remember as much of it as possible — this is key to initial memorisation. Then wait a couple of days and recall it, then a bit longer — this is key to information retention. (Google active recall and spaced repetition if you're unsure what I mean).

2. For quotes, I wrote them on flashcards. Initially I used active recall to memorise the flashcards. Then I stuck them in random locations around the house and recalled whenever I saw them. E.g. one notecard (for Of Mice and Men) had 'quotes about Curly's wife and the colour red' on one side and I put it on my wardrobe door; every time I opened my wardrobe I recalled the 3 quotes on the back of the card.

3. Most importantly do every single past paper question. I can't stress this enough. Write out full essays for as many essay questions as you can/wish, but at the very least write a plan for every past paper question you can find.

4. Try and get a friend/family member/teacher to mark them too: otherwise you will be subjective and give yourself more credit than you deserve mark-wise (which would be unrepresentative of the actual test).

5. Read the examiner's comments. The examiner's literally tell you what they liked about people's answers, and what they didn't like, for the respective examination year. It's a god-send: they tell you how to stand out. You can find them online (usually somewhere near the past papers).

6. Have a good revision plan. Don't leave it to the last minute. If you have left it to the last minute already, focus on past paper questions!!!!

FYI I did this and got an A* (9); and despite always hating Eng Lit and being a science person, one of my highest marks of all my exams was in Eng Lit.
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Velvet cake
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#5
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#5
(Original post by daan.m)
I also had your problem for GCSE Eng Lit — I had no idea how to revise it.

I'd recommend:
1. Mind mapping using active recall: Go through each key character and theme (find a list somewhere or ask your teacher) and compile info you would write about them in an essay into a mind map, including quotations. Basically plan every possible essay out. Use an A3 sheet if u can to get more content on it. Then cover it up and try and remember as much of it as possible — this is key to initial memorisation. Then wait a couple of days and recall it, then a bit longer — this is key to information retention. (Google active recall and spaced repetition if you're unsure what I mean).

2. For quotes, I wrote them on flashcards. Initially I used active recall to memorise the flashcards. Then I stuck them in random locations around the house and recalled whenever I saw them. E.g. one notecard (for Of Mice and Men) had 'quotes about Curly's wife and the colour red' on one side and I put it on my wardrobe door; every time I opened my wardrobe I recalled the 3 quotes on the back of the card.

3. Most importantly do every single past paper question. I can't stress this enough. Write out full essays for as many essay questions as you can/wish, but at the very least write a plan for every past paper question you can find.

4. Try and get a friend/family member/teacher to mark them too: otherwise you will be subjective and give yourself more credit than you deserve mark-wise (which would be unrepresentative of the actual test).

5. Read the examiner's comments. The examiner's literally tell you what they liked about people's answers, and what they didn't like, for the respective examination year. It's a god-send: they tell you how to stand out. You can find them online (usually somewhere near the past papers).

6. Have a good revision plan. Don't leave it to the last minute. If you have left it to the last minute already, focus on past paper questions!!!!

FYI I did this and got an A* (9); and despite always hating Eng Lit and being a science person, one of my highest marks of all my exams was in Eng Lit.
HI I have my English lit exam tomorrow but I kinda left till last minute, you said to do past paper question but in my circumstances are you referring to planning quotes to answer the questions
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daan.m
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#6
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(Original post by Velvet cake)
HI I have my English lit exam tomorrow but I kinda left till last minute, you said to do past paper question but in my circumstances are you referring to planning quotes to answer the questions
If you've left it to the last minute, it's kinda difficult to made drastic changes. You'll want to do past paper questions to improve exam technique — since that will help no matter what comes up. There's not real much point in memorising lots of content as you won't be able to cover it all, and it'll be unlikely that whatever you learn comes up.

I'd say it's worth learning a few key book quotes that would fit in lots of different essay, but I'd 100% focus on practice questions.

Tbh you really should not have left it to the last minute — there's no magic solution to revising Eng Lit in a couple of days. It's supposed to take weeks of revision.
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Velvet cake
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#7
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(Original post by daan.m)
If you've left it to the last minute, it's kinda difficult to made drastic changes. You'll want to do past paper questions to improve exam technique — since that will help no matter what comes up. There's not real much point in memorising lots of content as you won't be able to cover it all, and it'll be unlikely that whatever you learn comes up.

I'd say it's worth learning a few key book quotes that would fit in lots of different essay, but I'd 100% focus on practice questions.

Tbh you really should not have left it to the last minute — there's no magic solution to revising Eng Lit in a couple of days. It's supposed to take weeks of revision.
I've started my revision last week but I as well didn't know how to approach English lit revision so i was procrastinating trying to find help ut only now have I done some themes with quotes and analysis but i feel like I just want to focus on learning my theme's analysis and quotes instead of writing full essays(since i don't have time at all),so would that be a possibility or at least at the maximum do 1 paragraph per theme exam question
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daan.m
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#8
Report 9 months ago
#8
(Original post by Velvet cake)
I've started my revision last week but I as well didn't know how to approach English lit revision so i was procrastinating trying to find help ut only now have I done some themes with quotes and analysis but i feel like I just want to focus on learning my theme's analysis and quotes instead of writing full essays(since i don't have time at all),so would that be a possibility or at least at the maximum do 1 paragraph per theme exam question
Yeah I get you.

I'd recommend:

1. Fully writing a few timed essays — critical for stamina practice, exam technique practice, time management practice

2. Plan as many essay questions as you can (if possible, every essay from every past paper) — solidifies knowledge and helps practise exam technique. These shouldn't take much time or effort, so you could rattle through like 5 or 6 in an hour.

3. Do what you are saying and do a few analysis paragraphs to help exam technique.
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