17 and pregnant

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Anonymous #1
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I'm 17 years old and pregnant, I am currently in sixth form and wondered if it is possible to complete education with a baby? Can I go to university with a toddler at home? I have a great support system, boy friend and family and friends and absolutely fine financially, just wanted to see if there was any advice for my education with a baby?
Thank you x
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V℮rsions
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Yeah if you have a baby sitter, don't see why not.
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Wannabevetnurse
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Hope you get a healthy child and get great grades
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spanker
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Well that escalated quickly.
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Kerzen
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I'm 17 years old and pregnant, I am currently in sixth form and wondered if it is possible to complete education with a baby? Can I go to university with a toddler at home? I have a great support system, boy friend and family and friends and absolutely fine financially, just wanted to see if there was any advice for my education with a baby?
Thank you x
How many weeks pregnant are you? Have you spoken to your GP about all the options open to you?
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Moonlight rain
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It is possible but no denying it’ll be difficult. Good luck
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londonmyst
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Yes, it is possible.
A few friends were teen parents and received extra financial support at uni through bursaries, grants & parents learning allowance.
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.S.K.T.
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You absolutely can! Universities often will have support for parents who are students, such as a nursery, social events for parents and other things. In fact, it may be an idea to discuss with the universities what they can offer you, so you can tailor your choice.

Don’t listen to the nonsense here. This has happened to many many people, and will continue to as well! Factor this into your decision making. Also, there are many unconventional routes to university. The timeline of your own education is your own, and if life gets in the way, that is totally fine. Do it on your own terms!
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NonIndigenous
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I'm 17 years old and pregnant, I am currently in sixth form and wondered if it is possible to complete education with a baby? Can I go to university with a toddler at home? I have a great support system, boy friend and family and friends and absolutely fine financially, just wanted to see if there was any advice for my education with a baby?
Thank you x
My main tip would be, don't feel tempted to leave the childcare entirely to your family and friends, or nanny. Set some time aside, regularly, to spend with your kid. And stick to it.

Kids frequently can acquire developmental disorders, ranging from mild anxiety, depression, through to serious personality disorders of the cluster-B variety, as a result of unreliable/absent parenting. Hence why a lot of these disorders are climbing in prevalence in our culture, likely because of the increased prevalence of unstable households, single-parenting, lack of home ownership and frequent relocations as a result, etc.

I doubt that is likely to happen to yourselves, if you have a strong and supportive family, but nonetheless, he/she will ultimately be your child. If you want your child to feel like a part of your life in the future, you need to be a part of theirs in the present. Or they're likely to drift.
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idonthaveaname1223
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I'm 17 years old and pregnant, I am currently in sixth form and wondered if it is possible to complete education with a baby? Can I go to university with a toddler at home? I have a great support system, boy friend and family and friends and absolutely fine financially, just wanted to see if there was any advice for my education with a baby?
Thank you x
yes you can, but has your school told you that you’d have to complete your a level years in a school for pregnant women? A friend of mine had to take the year out because she didn’t want to go to a different school and retake the year! As for uni, yes it’s very much possible! Hope it all goes well
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Kerzen
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I'm 17 years old and pregnant, I am currently in sixth form and wondered if it is possible to complete education with a baby? Can I go to university with a toddler at home? I have a great support system, boy friend and family and friends and absolutely fine financially, just wanted to see if there was any advice for my education with a baby?
Thank you x
When will you be taking your A Levels, by the way? What did you have in mind re your subject at Uni?
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idonthaveaname1223
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(Original post by NonIndigenous)
My main tip would be, don't feel tempted to leave the childcare entirely to your family and friends, or nanny. Set some time aside, regularly, to spend with your kid. And stick to it.

Kids frequently can acquire developmental disorders, ranging from mild anxiety, depression, through to serious personality disorders of the cluster-B variety, as a result of unreliable/absent parenting. Hence why a lot of these disorders are climbing in prevalence in our culture, likely because of the increased prevalence of unstable households, single-parenting, lack of home ownership and frequent relocations as a result, etc.

I doubt that is likely to happen to yourselves, if you have a strong and supportive family, but nonetheless, he/she will ultimately be your child. If you want your child to feel like a part of your life in the future, you need to be a part of theirs in the present. Or they're likely to drift.
No offence but that’s not what the post is asking, and idk it just seemed odd to me that that’s what you’re commenting, again no offence!
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NonIndigenous
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(Original post by idonthaveaname1223)
No offence but that’s not what the post is asking, and idk it just seemed odd to me that that’s what you’re commenting, again no offence!
ditto
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stomachulcer
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By having support and the financial ability to raise a child as a teenager, the situation is already a lot better for you than it is for others.
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Kerzen
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For the time while you are still at school, there seems to be a scheme which would help you called Care To Learn.

You must talk to your GP, though, about all the options open to you.

https://www.nhs.uk/pregnancy/support/teenage-pregnancy/
Last edited by Kerzen; 3 weeks ago
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glassalice
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(Original post by NonIndigenous)
My main tip would be, don't feel tempted to leave the childcare entirely to your family and friends, or nanny. Set some time aside, regularly, to spend with your kid. And stick to it.

Kids frequently can acquire developmental disorders, ranging from mild anxiety, depression, through to serious personality disorders of the cluster-B variety, as a result of unreliable/absent parenting. Hence why a lot of these disorders are climbing in prevalence in our culture, likely because of the increased prevalence of unstable households, single-parenting, lack of home ownership and frequent relocations as a result, etc.

I doubt that is likely to happen to yourselves, if you have a strong and supportive family, but nonetheless, he/she will ultimately be your child. If you want your child to feel like a part of your life in the future, you need to be a part of theirs in the present. Or they're likely to drift.
PRISOM
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Anonymous #4
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(Original post by NonIndigenous)
My main tip would be, don't feel tempted to leave the childcare entirely to your family and friends, or nanny. Set some time aside, regularly, to spend with your kid. And stick to it.

Kids frequently can acquire developmental disorders, ranging from mild anxiety, depression, through to serious personality disorders of the cluster-B variety, as a result of unreliable/absent parenting. Hence why a lot of these disorders are climbing in prevalence in our culture, likely because of the increased prevalence of unstable households, single-parenting, lack of home ownership and frequent relocations as a result, etc.

I doubt that is likely to happen to yourselves, if you have a strong and supportive family, but nonetheless, he/she will ultimately be your child. If you want your child to feel like a part of your life in the future, you need to be a part of theirs in the present. Or they're likely to drift.
This is somewhat true, but there's no reason you being at uni in the day would be any different from any other parent returning to work. I don't think you should be afraid to leave the baby in childcare, remember you getting a good education now will help you care for the child in the future.
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NonIndigenous
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(Original post by Anonymous)
This is somewhat true, but there's no reason you being at uni in the day would be any different from any other parent returning to work. I don't think you should be afraid to leave the baby in childcare, remember you getting a good education now will help you care for the child in the future.
It's not 'somewhat' true. It is true. But nothing you're saying contradicts what I said either.

Some people think they can just drop their responsibilities entirely on other people, with no repercussions. With age, you learn that is not true, almost ever. There are always repercussions, some just take 10-20 years to materialise. Some take even longer. Someone who is 17 years of age, for obvious reasons, won't have that perspective.

I'm not old enough to have acquired that type of experience in the familial context with kids myself, but I do have a long-standing interest in psychology, and have nonetheless experienced some dysfunctional upbringing myself, and been witness to similar in other people, and seen what effects those have had. Most of the time, this was preventable, if only people were more aware of the consequences their choices would have later in life.
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Anonymous #5
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(Original post by idonthaveaname1223)
No offence but that’s not what the post is asking, and idk it just seemed odd to me that that’s what you’re commenting, again no offence!
ik she didn’t ask but isn’t it important? like great thay OP can continue with her life provided she has other people to help but the child matters to. IMO having a kid at 17 is selfish, even if you can handle a child, the child is most likely gonna suffer mentally
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Kerzen
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How old were you when you miscarried, you must have been barely 16?

The advice to you that you would be unable to get pregnant because you had miscarried sounds very strange to me. I have never miscarried but I have friends who have and they were never told this, in fact, they were told that there was every chance that they would carry to term in the future.

I'm a little perplexed as to why you have waited till 14 weeks to speak to someone at the practice. It would have been better if you had spoken to your GP much earlier.
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