guayabera
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I'm currently firmed to do a BA in French and Portuguese, doing Portuguese as a beginner.

At the moment though, I'm studying French and German A Levels and am now considering doing a BA in Modern Languages which includes French, German and Portuguese.

Would anybody advice against this or is this a good idea? Has anyone done 3 languages at uni?

This is the link for a brief explanation into the Modern Languages and two languages course.
http://www.bristol.ac.uk/study/under...ern-languages/

I do really enjoy German and think it would be a shame to drop it having come this far with it, but on the other hand I don't know if three is too much and/or it would make my year abroad too expensive.

If you have the time I could do with as much advice as possible

Thanks
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SirNoodles
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I'm going to be studying Spanish, French and Portuguese (Beginners) in September so here's what I think:

To be perfectly honest, it's a completely individual thing. Doing 3 languages is very hard and many people wouldn't be able to handle the workload. If, however, you reckon you can and you really want to do 3 languages you definitely should!

It also depends on what languages you're doing. It'd be extremely difficult to do Chinese, German and Russian for a university degree and come out with a good level as they're 3 hard languages from completely different language families. However, in your combination French and Portuguese are both Romance languages and German is a Germanic language like English. So considering the relative proximity of all those 3 languages to each other and to English, the combination that you want to do is certainly doable.

If do you decide to do 3 languages you will do less cultural modules. Generally across the UK, language degrees are 50% language and 50% cultural modules (history, politics, literature cinema etc.) - but I'm sure you already know this by now. By doing 3 languages you'll have less credits for cultural modules as you'll spend those ones on your language classes. This is probably the main downside of a triple language degree but you may be able to use it to your advantage to only select the cultural modules that you specifically want to do (I personally plan on limiting literature/cinema and maximising the history/politics I do in my course haha).

Personally, I already am at an A*/A standard in French and Spanish and in October, once I'd decided that I'd do Portuguese at university, I began the Duolingo course and practising online. I'd definitely recommend learning the basics of the beginners' language before going to uni as I feel like it'll make your life a lot easier and will help you before you start your course.

But my advice would be to ask yourself: are you interested enough to want to do 3 languages? Are you willing to put the work in? Do you think you'll do well at it?

If the answer is yes I'd fully recommend going for it. Speaking 4 languages is very rare especially in the UK and it'll make you much more employable. Good luck
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guayabera
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(Original post by SirNoodles)
I'm going to be studying Spanish, French and Portuguese (Beginners) in September so here's what I think:

To be perfectly honest, it's a completely individual thing. Doing 3 languages is very hard and many people wouldn't be able to handle the workload. If, however, you reckon you can and you really want to do 3 languages you definitely should!

It also depends on what languages you're doing. It'd be extremely difficult to do Chinese, German and Russian for a university degree and come out with a good level as they're 3 hard languages from completely different language families. However, in your combination French and Portuguese are both Romance languages and German is a Germanic language like English. So considering the relative proximity of all those 3 languages to each other and to English, the combination that you want to do is certainly doable.

If do you decide to do 3 languages you will do less cultural modules. Generally across the UK, language degrees are 50% language and 50% cultural modules (history, politics, literature cinema etc.) - but I'm sure you already know this by now. By doing 3 languages you'll have less credits for cultural modules as you'll spend those ones on your language classes. This is probably the main downside of a triple language degree but you may be able to use it to your advantage to only select the cultural modules that you specifically want to do (I personally plan on limiting literature/cinema and maximising the history/politics I do in my course haha).

Personally, I already am at an A*/A standard in French and Spanish and in October, once I'd decided that I'd do Portuguese at university, I began the Duolingo course and practising online. I'd definitely recommend learning the basics of the beginners' language before going to uni as I feel like it'll make your life a lot easier and will help you before you start your course.

But my advice would be to ask yourself: are you interested enough to want to do 3 languages? Are you willing to put the work in? Do you think you'll do well at it?

If the answer is yes I'd fully recommend going for it. Speaking 4 languages is very rare especially in the UK and it'll make you much more employable. Good luck
Couldn’t have asked for a more in depth answer! Thanks so much - really appreciate it. Do you know if it’s too late or not to change course after I’ve firmed? Again thanks sm for all that. Do you know how your year abroad is divided ?
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SirNoodles
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(Original post by guayabera)
Couldn’t have asked for a more in depth answer! Thanks so much - really appreciate it. Do you know if it’s too late or not to change course after I’ve firmed? Again thanks sm for all that. Do you know how your year abroad is divided ?
Well I know at Bristol you can do an only do an advanced language as long as you have the A Level to do it so you'll definitely be able to do Post-A Level French and German and then Portuguese as the beginners language. Considering you'll still be doing Modern Languages but just three languages rather than two I don't see why you can't change it (I know that most unis are flexible in this respect and I don't see why Bristol wouldn't). Just send them an email explaining the situation and I'd imagine they'd allow you to change from two languages to three as it's not like you're doing a completely different course.

The year abroad is split up between the countries of your target languages. To be perfectly honest, I'm not sure how it works at Bristol but I know for Nottingham I have to spend a minimum of 3 months in each country. Some triple language courses make it compulsory to spend time in countries of all three languages whereas others only recommend it if you can fit it in. You'll have to research into that for Bristol, though.

No problem and I'm glad to have been able to help
Last edited by SirNoodles; 4 months ago
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SpannersVC
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Bear in mind for a lot of universities, you can start with 3 but have to drop down to 2 after second year and can only divide the year abroad between 2 countries. Dividing it three ways also significantly reduces your options. The other thing with doing 3 is you spend most of your credits on the core language courses, leaving little or no time for the “content” courses in literature, society, history etc, which feels a little dry and like you’d be missing out.

I originally considered doing 3 myself but ended up deciding on 2 because of the above.
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