Bsc Economics Leicester without maths a level

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192943
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Hi , can you please tell me how much maths percentage wise you would say this has at Leicester. I don’t LOVE maths, and my a levels are bio Chem English lit
How was the jump from gcse maths to economics ? Is there also essays ?
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MindMax2000
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(Original post by 192943)
Hi , can you please tell me how much maths percentage wise you would say this has at Leicester. I don’t LOVE maths, and my a levels are bio Chem English lit
How was the jump from gcse maths to economics ? Is there also essays ?
Your A Levels suspiciously look like you were preparing for Medicine. Just thought I might point that out.

I used the following webpage to make the below assessment: https://le.ac.uk/courses/economics-bsc/2021

Bad news is the math is a bit of a jump. You're essentially look at least AS level maths and AS level further maths. Your first year will going to be fun at Leicester.
In Maths for Economics 1, you would more or less revisit GCSE maths until they introduce differentiation and exponentials/logs.
In Maths for Economics 2, you're going to be thrown into matrix calculations and integration. Integration is the opposite of differentiation, so it's not too bad, but matrix calculations will be cumbersome.
Statistics for Economists 1 will be essentially stats in AS level maths.
Statistics for Economists 2 will be Statistics for Economists 1 using computer software, so more about interpretation than calculation
It seems they want to frontload all the maths in the first year.
The maths in Microeconomics and Macroeconmics should be at GCSE level. It's mostly simple triangles, 2D graphs, and basic accounting principles.
Anything that starts with Contemporary Issues usually is more about talking than calculations.

In Year 2, you have Introductory Econometrics and Topics in Applied Econometrics, which are essentially more of Statistics for Economists 2 with more models. The models tend to be simple, but you will need to understand the use of logs in these models to calculate the approximation of percentage change. However, most of the maths isn't rocket science.
Intermediate microeconomics might have a bit of A Level maths, since you will be using differentation a lot
The maths in Intermediate Macroeconomics, Game Theory, Money and Central Banking, and Labour Economics shouldn't really be above that at GCSE level, if you know how to use GCSE maths fluently. You might need to do a bit of differentiation and understand abstract notations in Macroeconomics though.

In your third year, the maths will more or less be nonexistent for your mandatory modules, since it's all descriptive theory. That makes it hard.
Your dissertation will likely involve stats, so you would be looking at stuff you learn in Introductory Econometrics.
The maths you need in Industrial Economics, Managerial Economics, and International Finance shouldn't be more than GCSE, but I can't guarantee that because I haven't seen the material. There shouldn't be that much maths in International Finance at least.

From the looks of it, I'd say it's roughly 40-50% maths (I'm leaning more towards the 50%), but it's not rocket science and you should be able to handle it if you work hard.

If you read up on A Level maths books, you would want to read up on: Differentiation, integration, logarithms, exponentials, matrices, hypothesis testing, regressions, normal distribution.

The books I would otherwise recommend (if you don't like A Level maths books) are:
Mathematics for Economics and Business by Ian Jacques (this one book should cover everything you need for your time at Leicester)
Quantitative Methods: For Business, Management and Finance by Louise Swift and Sally Piff (highly recommended for the stats, and it can make things a lot clearer than some A Level books on stats)
Basic Econometrics by Damodar N. Gujarati (this is essentially the bible of econometrics for me, and the writing is brilliant for stats)

And yes, essentially in any economics degree course, you would have like 80% essays throughout. Unless it's a specialised maths module where you get a list of questions to answer as part of your assignment (e.g. Maths for Economics, Statistics for Economists, and Introductory Econometrics), you are expected to have essays for coursework. A large section (at least 50%) of the exams will involve essays except in the maths modules.
Last edited by MindMax2000; 5 months ago
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192943
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(Original post by MindMax2000)
Your A Levels suspiciously look like you were preparing for Medicine. Just thought I might point that out.

I used the following webpage to make the below assessment: https://le.ac.uk/courses/economics-bsc/2021

Bad news is the math is a bit of a jump. You're essentially look at least AS level maths and AS level further maths. Your first year will going to be fun at Leicester.
In Maths for Economics 1, you would more or less revisit GCSE maths until they introduce differentiation and exponentials/logs.
In Maths for Economics 2, you're going to be thrown into matrix calculations and integration. Integration is the opposite of differentiation, so it's not too bad, but matrix calculations will be cumbersome.
Statistics for Economists 1 will be essentially stats in AS level maths.
Statistics for Economists 2 will be Statistics for Economists 1 using computer software, so more about interpretation than calculation
It seems they want to frontload all the maths in the first year.
The maths in Microeconomics and Macroeconmics should be at GCSE level. It's mostly simple triangles, 2D graphs, and basic accounting principles.
Anything that starts with Contemporary Issues usually is more about talking than calculations.

In Year 2, you have Introductory Econometrics and Topics in Applied Econometrics, which are essentially more of Statistics for Economists 2 with more models. The models tend to be simple, but you will need to understand the use of logs in these models to calculate the approximation of percentage change. However, most of the maths isn't rocket science.
Intermediate microeconomics might have a bit of A Level maths, since you will be using differentation a lot
The maths in Intermediate Macroeconomics, Game Theory, Money and Central Banking, and Labour Economics shouldn't really be above that at GCSE level, if you know how to use GCSE maths fluently. You might need to do a bit of differentiation and understand abstract notations in Macroeconomics though.

In your third year, the maths will more or less be nonexistent for your mandatory modules, since it's all descriptive theory. That makes it hard.
Your dissertation will likely involve stats, so you would be looking at stuff you learn in Introductory Econometrics.
The maths you need in Industrial Economics, Managerial Economics, and International Finance shouldn't be more than GCSE, but I can't guarantee that because I haven't seen the material. There shouldn't be that much maths in International Finance at least.

From the looks of it, I'd say it's roughly 40-50% maths (I'm leaning more towards the 50%), but it's not rocket science and you should be able to handle it if you work hard.

If you read up on A Level maths books, you would want to read up on: Differentiation, integration, logarithms, exponentials, matrices, hypothesis testing, regressions, normal distribution.

The books I would otherwise recommend (if you don't like A Level maths books) are:
Mathematics for Economics and Business by Ian Jacques (this one book should cover everything you need for your time at Leicester)
Quantitative Methods: For Business, Management and Finance by Louise Swift and Sally Piff (highly recommended for the stats, and it can make things a lot clearer than some A Level books on stats)
Basic Econometrics by Damodar N. Gujarati (this is essentially the bible of econometrics for me, and the writing is brilliant for stats)

And yes, essentially in any economics degree course, you would have like 80% essays throughout. Unless it's a specialised maths module where you get a list of questions to answer as part of your assignment (e.g. Maths for Economics, Statistics for Economists, and Introductory Econometrics), you are expected to have essays for coursework. A large section (at least 50%) of the exams will involve essays except in the maths modules.
Thank you so much
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