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Is a level english language or literature better for law?

Hi everyone I was curious on whether English a level language or literature was better to take for someone who wants to study law in university and become a barrister. Some sixth forms I’m also applying to has combined as well but which would you say is best to take? My English grades have improved a lot and I’ve been getting close to full marks on previous exams now and I’ve really began to enjoy the subject since September last year and would love to take it in a level. I think my literature is better than language as I have a bit of a struggle on picking out the harder language techniques but I’ve been working on it. So yeah which a level would you say is better to take language/literature or combined? Thank you

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Original post by Hailey629
Hi everyone I was curious on whether English a level language or literature was better to take for someone who wants to study law in university and become a barrister. Some sixth forms I’m also applying to has combined as well but which would you say is best to take? My English grades have improved a lot and I’ve been getting close to full marks on previous exams now and I’ve really began to enjoy the subject since September last year and would love to take it in a level. I think my literature is better than language as I have a bit of a struggle on picking out the harder language techniques but I’ve been working on it. So yeah which a level would you say is better to take language/literature or combined? Thank you

Hello @Hailey629,

Hope you are doing well! :smile:

I currently study Law at university and I did English Literature for my A-Levels, but that was because I enjoyed the subject. I also know people who did not do English for their A-Levels and instead did all science subjects. When it comes to studying Law, in my personal experience most Universities looked at grades rather than the A-Level subjects completed. This then meant that everyone had differing A-Level subjects that they had done, but this did not put anyone at a disadvantage since Law was a new subject for everyone. Although some people had done A-Level Law, everyone was assured that no one was at a disadvantage due to their differing A-Level choices.

My main bit of advice would be to choose subjects that you are interested in, due to the fact you are more likely to do well in them if you enjoy them.

I hope that is able to help! If you do have any further questions, please do feel free to ask. I would be more than happy to help! :smile:

All the best,

Shaf
Reply 2
Original post by Oxford Brookes University
Hello @Hailey629,

Hope you are doing well! :smile:

I currently study Law at university and I did English Literature for my A-Levels, but that was because I enjoyed the subject. I also know people who did not do English for their A-Levels and instead did all science subjects. When it comes to studying Law, in my personal experience most Universities looked at grades rather than the A-Level subjects completed. This then meant that everyone had differing A-Level subjects that they had done, but this did not put anyone at a disadvantage since Law was a new subject for everyone. Although some people had done A-Level Law, everyone was assured that no one was at a disadvantage due to their differing A-Level choices.

My main bit of advice would be to choose subjects that you are interested in, due to the fact you are more likely to do well in them if you enjoy them.

I hope that is able to help! If you do have any further questions, please do feel free to ask. I would be more than happy to help! :smile:

All the best,

Shaf


Hi thank you it helps a lot I love English and I’ve began to really enjoy it this year I’m considering doing it for a level and how would you say English literature was? Did you find it hard?
Original post by Hailey629
Hi everyone I was curious on whether English a level language or literature was better to take for someone who wants to study law in university and become a barrister. Some sixth forms I’m also applying to has combined as well but which would you say is best to take? My English grades have improved a lot and I’ve been getting close to full marks on previous exams now and I’ve really began to enjoy the subject since September last year and would love to take it in a level. I think my literature is better than language as I have a bit of a struggle on picking out the harder language techniques but I’ve been working on it. So yeah which a level would you say is better to take language/literature or combined? Thank you

Hands down lit
Original post by Hailey629
Hi everyone I was curious on whether English a level language or literature was better to take for someone who wants to study law in university and become a barrister. Some sixth forms I’m also applying to has combined as well but which would you say is best to take? My English grades have improved a lot and I’ve been getting close to full marks on previous exams now and I’ve really began to enjoy the subject since September last year and would love to take it in a level. I think my literature is better than language as I have a bit of a struggle on picking out the harder language techniques but I’ve been working on it. So yeah which a level would you say is better to take language/literature or combined? Thank you

it 100% doesn't matter. you should do the one you get the best grades in and enjoy the most. i study law and i personally did lang and it hasn't made any difference for me compared to the people who did lit. i found lang really easy because I also studied two other languages so i knew a lot about linguistics. a level lit is quite similar to gcse lit from what i hear but harder obviously. the combined lang&lit a level may be easier if you're not as good as picking out the harder language techniques since it's not as highly focused on that. although bear in mind i did wjec a levels so it might be different if youre doing e.g. ocr/aqa

just a note: i forgot this when i wrote this so editing lol but english language a level is NOT like english language gcse my course was almost 90% about linguistics with a bit of creative writing thrown in. so maybe check out if that's your cup of tea first. it is very very different
(edited 3 years ago)
Reply 5
Thank you to everyone the main sixth form I want to go into has combined English only but they only accept around 10 people and their own school students so spaces open up once people in their school does not attend so if I get in I will do combined. I’m also wanting to do sociology and along with it possibly politics or maybe religious studies but the sixth form doesn’t offer religious studies so would you say that would be a hard combination to get A*AA in?
English lang. has one of the lowest A* rates of any a-level. Avoid it like the plague.
Original post by Hailey629
Thank you to everyone the main sixth form I want to go into has combined English only but they only accept around 10 people and their own school students so spaces open up once people in their school does not attend so if I get in I will do combined. I’m also wanting to do sociology and along with it possibly politics or maybe religious studies but the sixth form doesn’t offer religious studies so would you say that would be a hard combination to get A*AA in?

I don't think there's any 'hard' or 'easy' a level subjects. it's v subjective. for example i got an a* in eng lang and found it simple but if i took chemistry i would've failed for sure. similarly i think the people getting a*s in chemistry might well have failed english language. you'll have to look at your results at gcse to try and decipher your easiest subjects to get a*aa in!

my advice would be to try and pick subjects that use similar skillsets. like people who do maths further maths and physics because they're good with numbers and calculations. i think doing english with politics is probably a good choice since they both depend on essays (could be wrong tho!). you could also do english lit and english lang as separate non-combined subjects - i knew a couple of people who did that and they seemed to do ok? maybe check how much of sociology a level is essays vs interpretation of data. if its data interpretative it might be more work for you than a purely essay based subject. then again you might be better at interpretation of data so go for that if so!
Original post by camapplicant530
English lang. has one of the lowest A* rates of any a-level. Avoid it like the plague.

^^ i wasn't aware it has such low a* rates but from my experience it's fine if you know what you're getting into - it's not horrendous and can be really enjoyable. i was aware of the difference from gcse because i spoke to the course convenor beforehand but 95% of my class at a level thought it was just going to be creative writing then was really shocked when the teacher started going on about adverbs and middle english lol because for some reason at GCSE that's all it is. also if the teacher is s**t = hard to get an a* because again it's basically linguistics not gcse english language. there are some really great textbooks that teach you everything you need to know if OP has one of those and is willing to do a bit of extra work they'll be fine.
Reply 9
Thank you everyone if I get into my main sixth form I will probably do combined English and if I get into the other ones which may offer them seperately I will take English literature I think as it seems as though I will most likely be best in that. I will compare it to my gcse results as if I get below a grade 7 I think I may or may not take it as it could be like setting myself up to fail as a levels are already hard. Thank you to everyone!
Original post by Hailey629
Hi thank you it helps a lot I love English and I’ve began to really enjoy it this year I’m considering doing it for a level and how would you say English literature was? Did you find it hard?

Hello @Hailey629,

No worries, happy to help! :smile:

I would say that A-Level English Literature was different when compared to GCSE, it was more challenging but that is expected with A - Levels. Once I had gotten used to the leap from GCSE to A - Level, I did enjoy it; especially since I liked the texts that we were studying.

I hope this is able to help, if you do have anymore questions, please do feel free to ask. :smile:

All the best,
Shaf
Reply 11
Original post by Oxford Brookes University
Hello @Hailey629,

No worries, happy to help! :smile:

I would say that A-Level English Literature was different when compared to GCSE, it was more challenging but that is expected with A - Levels. Once I had gotten used to the leap from GCSE to A - Level, I did enjoy it; especially since I liked the texts that we were studying.

I hope this is able to help, if you do have anymore questions, please do feel free to ask. :smile:

All the best,
Shaf


Hi when it came to reading the books did you read them in class like you would in gcse or were you expected to read and finish the book at home? How many books did you have to read and did you also feel like you couldn’t keep up with the workload/reading?
Original post by camapplicant530
English lang. has one of the lowest A* rates of any a-level. Avoid it like the plague.


wish i knew that 2 years ago, didn't realise it would be this hard lmao
Reply 13
[QUOTE="Hailey629;95045704"]Hi when it came to reading the books did you read them in class like you would in gcse or were you expected to read and finish the book at home? How many books did you have to read and did you also feel like you couldn’t keep up with the workload/reading?[/QUOTE
?
Literature. That is the traditional and best one. Lang is offered less at the better schools which says it all really...
Reply 15
I’m going towards more of English literature but would you say combined is harder or worth less than picking one of the English subjects and studying it more in depth like literature?
Original post by Hailey629
Hi when it came to reading the books did you read them in class like you would in gcse or were you expected to read and finish the book at home? How many books did you have to read and did you also feel like you couldn’t keep up with the workload/reading?

Hello @Hailey629,

So in my experience we were expected to read, analyse and annotate chapters of the books at home, so that when we were in class we could all discuss our ideas with each other. There were occasions when we would read through some of the key chapters as a class during class, but A - Level English Literature was much more independent than GCSE.

We studied eight books in total from what I can remember. Four novels, two plays and two poetry anthologies. At any one time we would be studying two different books, two out of the eight texts we had to complete coursework on and then the remaining 6 we had exams on. Although it may seem like a lot of reading at times, as long as you keep on top of it you should be fine, especially if you enjoy the texts that you are studying.

This was my experience of the subject! I hope it will be able to help you in making your decision. If you have anymore questions, please do ask! :smile:

All the best,

Shaf
Reply 17
Thank you I don’t mind reading so I’m thinking if I would be able to read that many as I am a little of a slow reader so I guess I could maybe start the reading a bit ahead or something. I really enjoy English and find the subject fun as well so I guess I will do a bit more research on it and see if I will do it for a levels when it’s time. Thank you again!
Original post by Hailey629
Thank you I don’t mind reading so I’m thinking if I would be able to read that many as I am a little of a slow reader so I guess I could maybe start the reading a bit ahead or something. I really enjoy English and find the subject fun as well so I guess I will do a bit more research on it and see if I will do it for a levels when it’s time. Thank you again!

No worries @Hailey629. Happy to help. :smile:

In my personal experience one of the most important aspects is enjoying the subjects that you are doing. If you have any more questions, please do feel free to ask. I would be happy to help. Good luck with everything! :smile:

All the best,

Shaf
Reply 19
Original post by Oxford Brookes University
No worries @Hailey629. Happy to help. :smile:

In my personal experience one of the most important aspects is enjoying the subjects that you are doing. If you have any more questions, please do feel free to ask. I would be happy to help. Good luck with everything! :smile:

All the best,

Shaf


Thank you for all your help!

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