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If I want to do psych at uni do I defo need to do the a level or can I do the applied

Can I do applied btec psych, is that also accepted the same
Yes for the majority.

Go on potential university course pages and see what their entry requirements are. :smile:
(For reference - you don't need to have any previous experience with psychology before applying to a uni course anyway. I never studied it before my degree!)
Hi there,

While I did an A-Level in Psychology, you can still apply and be accepted into a Psychology degree without prior qualifications in that subject area, it is just an added bonus - for me, it gave me extra knowledge on general ideas in Psychology which helped me in certain modules throughout my degree! Most universities provide entry requirements in detail of what they require you to have. For example, applying for BSc Psychology at Arden requires "two subjects at GCE A-Level or equivalent, plus passes at grade C or above in three subjects at GCSE level including Maths or equivalent". From what I know, applied Psychology BTEC is the equivalent of one full A-Level and is widely recognised!

Toni Bennett
Arden University Student Ambassador
Original post by amelia1234567891
Can I do applied btec psych, is that also accepted the same

You don't even need an A-level in psychology to do it at Uni, some would rather want their students to have some background in science, like biology or chemistry. But to answer your question, yes, most Universities do accept it. However, it's always best to check your desired Uni's entry requirements.
Original post by eduorclinpsych
Yes for the majority.

Go on potential university course pages and see what their entry requirements are. :smile:


Thanks!
Original post by GoldenCrow
You don't even need an A-level in psychology to do it at Uni, some would rather want their students to have some background in science, like biology or chemistry. But to answer your question, yes, most Universities do accept it. However, it's always best to check your desired Uni's entry requirements.

Thanks!

Original post by Arden University
Hi there,

While I did an A-Level in Psychology, you can still apply and be accepted into a Psychology degree without prior qualifications in that subject area, it is just an added bonus - for me, it gave me extra knowledge on general ideas in Psychology which helped me in certain modules throughout my degree! Most universities provide entry requirements in detail of what they require you to have. For example, applying for BSc Psychology at Arden requires "two subjects at GCE A-Level or equivalent, plus passes at grade C or above in three subjects at GCSE level including Maths or equivalent". From what I know, applied Psychology BTEC is the equivalent of one full A-Level and is widely recognised!

Toni Bennett
Arden University Student Ambassador

Thanks !
Hey! Psychology graduate here! You don’t need to have an A-level in psychology to get accepted. I didn’t have one and I got in first application. It just helps maybe? I’m unsure but universities rarely ask for it as it’s not commonly taught across the UK
Original post by amelia1234567891
Can I do applied btec psych, is that also accepted the same


Hi there I have a Psychology degree and I never studied it at a level as it wasn’t even an option in my sixth form!
Check the entry requirements of universities you like the look of. Most don't require any sort of specific a-level / btec, whilst some just require any science subject (such as biology or chemistry).
Original post by amelia1234567891
Can I do applied btec psych, is that also accepted the same


well, this year I'm going to University to do Psychology with a placement year and I did Psychology in Sixth form. I guess it depends on the university and what they want in their entry requirements.
Original post by eduorclinpsych
(For reference - you don't need to have any previous experience with psychology before applying to a uni course anyway. I never studied it before my degree!)


hi
im considering doing psychology at uni and saw you didn't study it beforehand.
how have you found it considering you had no experience? i am currently not doing psych at a level so was wondering how it has been for you :smile:
Original post by plaidshirtbigirl
hi
im considering doing psychology at uni and saw you didn't study it beforehand.
how have you found it considering you had no experience? i am currently not doing psych at a level so was wondering how it has been for you :smile:

Hi there,

My route is a bit different as its my second Bachelor's degree.

That being said, I didn't feel any better prepared for the subject content, just the writing elements. It's definitely been challenging but I think it would be whether I'd previously studied it for A-Level or not. A fantastic thing about the subject is that there are lots of books, articles etc. surrounding a lot of the common themes so nothing seemed 100% 'new'. A lot of universities don't class pre-psych study as a requirement but would rather biology and/or maths.

Hope this helps!
Original post by eduorclinpsych
Hi there,

My route is a bit different as its my second Bachelor's degree.

That being said, I didn't feel any better prepared for the subject content, just the writing elements. It's definitely been challenging but I think it would be whether I'd previously studied it for A-Level or not. A fantastic thing about the subject is that there are lots of books, articles etc. surrounding a lot of the common themes so nothing seemed 100% 'new'. A lot of universities don't class pre-psych study as a requirement but would rather biology and/or maths.

Hope this helps!

thanks a bunch :smile:
i am currently studying maths at a level and ik it’s not the best idea but i’ve looked on tiktok and wat he’d people’s videos who study psychology. they all seem to say it’s really challenging at a level then even worse at uni. i’m kinda worried i’m not smart enough or i won’t get the hang of anything.

any advice on how to study and get the best grades i’m capable of?
Original post by plaidshirtbigirl
thanks a bunch :smile:
i am currently studying maths at a level and ik it’s not the best idea but i’ve looked on tiktok and wat he’d people’s videos who study psychology. they all seem to say it’s really challenging at a level then even worse at uni. i’m kinda worried i’m not smart enough or i won’t get the hang of anything.

any advice on how to study and get the best grades i’m capable of?

No worries!

To be fair, when you're dedicating so much time, emotion, stress and money into something I don't think anyone would say their degree was 'easy'. It is difficult and it's designed to test you as an individual but academically too - uni would be so boring if there wasn't some growth and opportunity to continue your learning!

When I had similar concerns during A-level (as the first person in my family to go to uni) I went on some uni pages and had a look at their course descriptions and modules, I found it exciting to read things that sounded of genuine interest to me, I then looked at the grade requirements and knew that if I worked hard and focused that I could get what I needed - they'd never accept anyone who wasn't capable. If you're taking maths A-level then it means you performed well at GCSE and obviously value your learning, just don't let doubt override your ambitions.

I've always felt that there's a different strategy to getting the top grade at A-level for each subject. Biggest tip would be to stay focused on why you're actually studying and what you want to use the hard work for - I think those who I knew at college that lost sight of this became a bit lost in the whole process themselves. Also keep on top of your revision, when you finish a unit, put in the time at home to go over and revise that unit like the exam for it will be at the end of the next unit and repeat. This helped relieve so much pressure for me (and I was still very stressed during A-level exams!) but when I opened the papers I could just get on and write and do what I needed to do.

If you're not sure how to lay out notes or how to approach revision, I'd recommend searching on YouTube for A-level subject advice and listen to how other people got their grades/their revision techniques etc. This wasn't really a thing when I was going through a-levels (it was just all Zoella and Tanya Burr trying to sell things hiding the fact they were paid lots to say they liked a product!) but there's some really good stuff out there. Revision tends to be that 'hidden knowledge' and it shouldn't be.
Original post by eduorclinpsych
No worries!

To be fair, when you're dedicating so much time, emotion, stress and money into something I don't think anyone would say their degree was 'easy'. It is difficult and it's designed to test you as an individual but academically too - uni would be so boring if there wasn't some growth and opportunity to continue your learning!

When I had similar concerns during A-level (as the first person in my family to go to uni) I went on some uni pages and had a look at their course descriptions and modules, I found it exciting to read things that sounded of genuine interest to me, I then looked at the grade requirements and knew that if I worked hard and focused that I could get what I needed - they'd never accept anyone who wasn't capable. If you're taking maths A-level then it means you performed well at GCSE and obviously value your learning, just don't let doubt override your ambitions.

I've always felt that there's a different strategy to getting the top grade at A-level for each subject. Biggest tip would be to stay focused on why you're actually studying and what you want to use the hard work for - I think those who I knew at college that lost sight of this became a bit lost in the whole process themselves. Also keep on top of your revision, when you finish a unit, put in the time at home to go over and revise that unit like the exam for it will be at the end of the next unit and repeat. This helped relieve so much pressure for me (and I was still very stressed during A-level exams!) but when I opened the papers I could just get on and write and do what I needed to do.

If you're not sure how to lay out notes or how to approach revision, I'd recommend searching on YouTube for A-level subject advice and listen to how other people got their grades/their revision techniques etc. This wasn't really a thing when I was going through a-levels (it was just all Zoella and Tanya Burr trying to sell things hiding the fact they were paid lots to say they liked a product!) but there's some really good stuff out there. Revision tends to be that 'hidden knowledge' and it shouldn't be.

thank you so much!

how are you enjoying/enjoyed uni anyway? i’m worried i won’t make friends easily when the time comes as i haven’t made any new proper friends since starting sixth form.
also, what is it like trying to adapt to your new very independent lifestyle?
Hi there,

No A-levels are needed. A-levels are definitely to your advantage if you've done them before applying for a psychology degree, but they are not necessary. I did not do any A-levels, yet I graduated last year with a first-class.

Hope that helps!

Ivaylo
BSc Psychology, MSc Health Psychology student
Student Ambassador

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