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#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
can someone mark this for me?

How are the effects of conflict presented in Poppies and one other poem?

In both Poppies and Kamikaze, familial conflict is shown. In Poppies, we see this vulnerable mother, trying her best to stay strong, as she watches her son slip away from her to war. We see fear, loss, sadness and weakness portrayed from the mother. Unlike Kamikaze, where we are shown a daughter, filled with confusion, not understanding how or why her father returned from war. Differentiating from Poppies, Kamikaze displays emotions of wonder, embarrassment and shame over this father who has managed to survive his mission. Both these poems discuss the effect of conflict not only in families, but consciously.

Immediately, at the beginning of Poppies, we see the mother trying to care for her son, one last time, before he leaves. “I resisted the impulse to run my fingers through the gelled blackthorns of your hair” this quote explained how the mother is trying to stop her motherly habits of being physically affectionate towards her son, knowing it might be the last time she can. It is clear that the mother is trying hard to separate herself from her son, to avoid her emotions getting too much. The word “impulse” suggests that she has a strong urge to be there for her son, it is something she struggles to control. The “blackthorns” mentioned could be a reference to the crucifixion, when Jesus was carrying the cross and his mother, Mary, could not do anything about it. Both these mothers are helpless, suggesting the conflict between a mother and her protectiveness.

On the contrary, in Kamikaze we see a unique conflict between a family and their son who has managed to survive the war. “In his presence, nor did she meet his eyes, and the neighbours too, they treated him as though he no longer existed,” Here, we see a daughter who is unable to look at her father, knowing he should be dead. All the family are unsure of what to say to him, as if embarrassed by his existence; this suggests how making it out alive after a war gives you and the people close to you a sense of guilt and humiliation, knowing others died a hero, while you managed to make it out alive. In this quote, the daughter communicates in direct speech again. She speaks in a more factual, less descriptive way about her father’s life after his return, which also suggests he’s lost his image of honour. We also see a use of irony because even though he survived, he’s being treated as if he is dead.

In different circumstances, Poppies focuses on a mother battling with her inner conflict after her son is sent to war. “Skirting the church yard walls, my stomach busy making tucks, darts, pleats, hat-less, without a winter coat or reinforcements of scarf, gloves” this quote reveals quarrel between a mother and her vulnerability. Physically and mentally, she has never felt more weak. The continuous list of her personified fear shows how they are never ending and uninterrupted. The verb “skirting” indicated going round or past the edge, as if the mother is avoiding certain thoughts that are negative. “My stomach busy” as if she knows something has gone wrong, using her mother’s instincts. This quote is a dramatic monologue, showcasing all her inner emotions. Not only that, but we also see a juxtaposition of a mother standing in a war grave as her son has departed to war.

Similarly, we once again see inner conflict in Kamikaze between a man and his legacy. “And sometimes, she said, he must have wondered which has been the better way to die.” In this quote the daughter wonders if the father wanted to die as a hero in the war or be with his family, knowing he failed them and wasn’t a hero. This final sentence in the poem could be an example on the destructiveness of patriotism. The pilot’s family are so ashamed that they treat him as if he were dead. The verb “must” creates a bond between the pilot and the narrator, giving a sense of desperation in her tone like she wants to pity him.

Alternatively, at the end of Poppies, it focuses on a mother letting go of her battle with inner conflicts “the dove pulled freely against the sky, an ornamental stitch, I listened, hoping to hear your playground voice catching on the wind” this quote explains how her son is constantly on her mind and everything reminds her of him. A caesura is used, implying how she could be holding back tears. The “dove” represents the son as small, delicate and fragile like a dove. It also represents how the other wants to bring peace back into her life, after being at war with her own thoughts for too long. The alliteration “hoping to hear” shows a sense of excitement and thrill at the thought of hearing her son’s voice again. “Your playground voice” links to leaving to war as going to school, and as a mother hoping your son will return soon. “…voice catching the wind” suggests how the mother is hearing her son’s voice having wishful thinking that he is okay. It also suggests how her son’s voice is fading away from her as a poignant image.

Whereas in kamikaze we see conflict between inner conscience and obligation and patriotism. “…full of porful incantations and enough fuel for a one way journey into history”, in this quote, we see a man who feels obligated to serve his country, even though his conscience is telling him to avoid killing people, he also recognizes the glory and honour he will receive after the war. This pilot recognizes his duty and commitments to his country. The noun “incantation” links to spells and magic, suggesting the pilot was under a spell, linking to the influence of propaganda and indoctrination, linking to how many men were pushed and persuaded to join the war to defend their country. “One way journey into history” implies death and foreshadowing the many men that lost their lives during the war. It also juxtaposes for the pilot who was expecting to die in this war, yet made it out alive. An enjambment is used when he says he will go down in history, het it never happens to him, being his mission and journey didn’t end right.

To summarise the above, Kamikaze and Poppies both have similarities of inner conflict and familial conflict but in contrasting ways, Both these poems showcase the effects of conflict in differentiating ways. Poppies displays a grieving mother dealing with inner battles, whereas in Kamikaze we see a man struggling with conflict between not only his family but also within himself. Poppies is layered with tones of sadness, desperation and anxiety, while Kamikaze outlines regret, same and embarrassment. Both poems have been written in 1st person with distinct structures, with kamikaze only having 3 sentences. In conclusion, the effects of conflict will always end in vulnerability and sadness.
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cytoplasm420
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#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
its rly good
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a109
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#3
Report 1 year ago
#3
verrrryyyy nice
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