German sentence

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NaBrO
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#1
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#1
Hi, I wrote this sentence and my teacher circled the 'um' but I'm not so sure why.

Here it is:
Er geht um die Skulptur herum.
(translated from: he walks around the sculpture)

Thanks for any help.
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zeddit
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#2
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#2
This seems good, don't know whats wrong in that sentence
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NaBrO
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#3
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#3
(Original post by zeddit)
This seems good, don't know whats wrong in that sentence
Dankeschön! Vielleicht war es ein Fehler?
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Kallisto
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#4
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#4
(Original post by NaBrO)
Hi, I wrote this sentence and my teacher circled the 'um' but I'm not so sure why.

Here it is:
Er geht um die Skulptur herum.
(translated from: he walks around the sculpture)

Thanks for any help.
Hi!

'um' in this sentence is not a preposition, it is part of the German adverb 'herum'. A sentence in German in combination with 'um...herum' just means that something goes around or walking in a circle.

These words in combination is always an adverb!

examples:

Das Pferd rennt um den Hof herum. (The horse runs around the yard)
Der Vogel fliegt um das Nest herum. (the bird flies around the net)

If 'um' is written only, it is a preposition!

examples:

Der Unterricht beginnt um 8:00 Uhr. (The lesson begins at 8 o'clock a.m.)
Die nächste Fähre fährt um 15:00 Uhr. (The next ferry rides at 3 o'clock p.m.)

As you can see this preposition is especially used when it is about time.
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NaBrO
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#5
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#5
(Original post by Kallisto)
Hi!

'um' in this sentence is not a preposition, it is part of the German adverb 'herum'. A sentence in German in combination with 'um...herum' just means that something goes around or walking in a circle.

These words in combination is always an adverb!

examples:

Das Pferd rennt um den Hof herum. (The horse runs around the yard)
Der Vogel fliegt um das Nest herum. (the bird flies around the net)

If 'um' is written only, it is a preposition!

examples:

Der Unterricht beginnt um 8:00 Uhr. (The lesson begins at 8 o'clock a.m.)
Die nächste Fähre fährt um 15:00 Uhr. (The next ferry rides at 3 o'clock p.m.)

As you can see this preposition is especially used when it is about time.
Hello! Thank you so much for your reply!

If you don't mind, I still have a few questions?
- In the case of my sentence, is it still correct as I wrote it?
- Would my sentence be correct without the herum?

Thanks again
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Kallisto
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#6
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#6
(Original post by NaBrO)
Hello! Thank you so much for your reply!

If you don't mind, I still have a few questions?
- In the case of my sentence, is it still correct as I wrote it?
- Would my sentence be correct without the herum?

Thanks again
As you wrote the German sentence above, it is 100% correct. That is both in grammar and syntax perfect. And no, the added word 'herum' has to be written!
Last edited by Kallisto; 1 year ago
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Krokodilo
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#7
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#7
I think a useful definition is that this is the separable verb "herumgehen" used with the prepostion "um":

[um {etwas}ᴬᴷᴷ] herumgehen = to walk/go around something/someone. This can also occur in be used in the sense of "etwas/jemanden umgehen" – to circumvent sth./someone

So, that's how "um" is correct in your sentence in this meaning.
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NaBrO
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#8
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#8
(Original post by krokodilo)
i think a useful definition is that this is the separable verb "herumgehen" used with the prepostion "um":

[um {etwas}ᴬᴷᴷ] herumgehen = to walk/go around something/someone. This can also occur in be used in the sense of "etwas/jemanden umgehen" – to circumvent sth./someone

so, that's how "um" is correct in your sentence in this meaning.
Thank you!!!
Last edited by NaBrO; 1 year ago
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