How to know what colour a metal complex colour will be ??

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Binkyboobear
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Hi. So i get transition metal ions have a colour and ive learnt what colour the complex formed between all the transition metal ions and naoh, nh3, na2co3, cl - etc.

My question is how do u know what a colour a complex formed will be if the complex contains two different types of ligand (for example [Cr(OH)3(NH3)3]).

Like if that complex had purely OH ligands then its colour would be deep green solution. but theres nh3 ligands attached as well. nh3 ligands alone with that would be purple solution. But theyre both in the complex so is there like a mixing of colours?? or does one have priority over another??

Thanks for any help!
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Binkyboobear
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Hi.

So i get transition metal ions have a colour and ive learnt what colour the complex formed between all the transition metal ions and naoh, nh3, na2co3, cl - etc.

My question is how do u know what a colour a complex formed will be if the complex contains two different types of ligand (for example [Cr(OH)3(NH3)3]).

Like if that complex had purely OH ligands then its colour would be deep green solution. but theres nh3 ligands attached as well. nh3 ligands alone with that would be purple solution. But theyre both in the complex so is there like a mixing of colours?? or does one have priority over another??

Thanks for any help!
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Binkyboobear
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Hi. So i get transition metal ions have a colour and ive learnt what colour the complex formed between all the transition metal ions and naoh, nh3, na2co3, cl - etc.

My question is how do u know what a colour a complex formed will be if the complex contains two different types of ligand (for example [Cr(OH)3(NH3)3]).

Like if that complex had purely OH ligands then its colour would be deep green solution. but theres nh3 ligands attached as well. nh3 ligands alone with that would be purple solution. But theyre both in the complex so is there like a mixing of colours?? or does one have priority over another??

Thanks for any help!
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charco
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(Original post by Binkyboobear)
Hi. So i get transition metal ions have a colour and ive learnt what colour the complex formed between all the transition metal ions and naoh, nh3, na2co3, cl - etc.

My question is how do u know what a colour a complex formed will be if the complex contains two different types of ligand (for example [Cr(OH)3(NH3)3]).

Like if that complex had purely OH ligands then its colour would be deep green solution. but theres nh3 ligands attached as well. nh3 ligands alone with that would be purple solution. But theyre both in the complex so is there like a mixing of colours?? or does one have priority over another??

Thanks for any help!
You have no way of knowing, don't worry about it.
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charco
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... and stop spamming the forum.
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Binkyboobear
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(Original post by charco)
You have no way of knowing, don't worry about it.
aren't there any questions where u need to know that? I thought I had seen some complexes where there were 2 different ligands that would affect colour and the question was asking what colour it would be?
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Zetnie
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(Original post by charco)
You have no way of knowing, don't worry about it.
what does that even mean einstein
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charco
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(Original post by Zetnie)
what does that even mean einstein
Einstein is a name. It needs a capital letter.

It means exactly what it says. The colour a transition metal complex is dependent on the ligand field splitting of the inner 3d orbitals. You would have to be able to predict the exact split between non-degenerate 'd' orbitals and then transform the energy into the wavelength and colour of the light absorbed. You would then have to factor in the same energy gap of different vibrational states to see which wavelegths they in turn absorb. Then you would have to add all of the complementary colours to get an overall colour that would be seen.

This analysis is far beyond the scope of an A' level student, and would be somewhat pointless, as the actual colour can easily be found empirically.
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Pick Nick
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You know what colour it'll be when it becomes that colour.
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Zetnie
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(Original post by charco)
Einstein is a name. It needs a capital letter.

It means exactly what it says. The colour a transition metal complex is dependent on the ligand field splitting of the inner 3d orbitals. You would have to be able to predict the exact split between non-degenerate 'd' orbitals and then transform the energy into the wavelength and colour of the light absorbed. You would then have to factor in the same energy gap of different vibrational states to see which wavelegths they in turn absorb. Then you would have to add all of the complementary colours to get an overall colour that would be seen.

This analysis is far beyond the scope of an A' level student, and would be somewhat pointless, as the actual colour can easily be found empirically.
Good afternoon Einstein.

I thought I would use some of my time to kindly point out that you should've said: 'The colour of a transition metal complex is dependent on the ligand field...'

Additionally, you could've said: 'The colour a transition metal complex is dependent on is the ligand field splitting in the inner 3d orbitals...'

I suggest you revise my corrections to avoid further confusion in the future.


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monkaS
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charco
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(Original post by Zetnie)
Good afternoon Einstein.

I thought I would use some of my time to kindly point out that you should've said: 'The colour of a transition metal complex is dependent on the ligand field...'

Additionally, you could've said: 'The colour a transition metal complex is dependent on is the ligand field splitting in the inner 3d orbitals...'

I suggest you revise my corrections to avoid further confusion in the future.


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monkaS
If you are available for editorial work, I may employ you before my next post. What are your rates?
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Binkyboobear
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(Original post by charco)
If you are available for editorial work, I may employ you before my next post. What are your rates?
come on lads. chemistry should be uniting us and bringing us closer together. not tearing us apart 🙏🙏🙏
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Zetnie
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(Original post by charco)
If you are available for editorial work, I may employ you before my next post. What are your rates?
I would have to kindly decline as my agent refuses that I work with amateurs.
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Zetnie
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(Original post by Binkyboobear)
come on lads. chemistry should be uniting us and bringing us closer together. not tearing us apart 🙏🙏🙏
Your the cisplatin to my regulated cell division
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charco
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(Original post by Zetnie)
Your the cisplatin to my regulated cell division
*You're
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Zetnie
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(Original post by charco)
*You're
This forum started in the same way it will end, you correcting a grammatical error. You have superseded my ability to navigate through the deep weaves of the English language, and with that I applaud you.

Even though I'm yet to reach any reconciliation between our differing standpoints, we have learnt about the futility of life. The bold arrow of time stops for nobody, and yet we still breathe.

I am still of the opinion that we need to understand the colours of ions in the transition metals topic, however you believe we do not need to remember this. Disagreements like this are essential in furthering our understanding of the A - level specification, so I thank you for your precious time.

Thorough analysis of our previously sent messages has demonstrated we both aren't as steady on our feet in terms of grammatical error, however your final critical hit has left me scared, bewildered and confused.

I offer you my last and final grammatical error for your most thorough, deep and penetrating analysis.

Your a chad

"Learnt from a pro as a mentor.." - JJ DOOM ~ Guv'nor


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sam
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charco
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(Original post by Zetnie)

Your a chad
*you're
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