Drugs fact file and useful services directory

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If you or somebody you know is taking drugs there are many services and helplines which may be of use.

One popular service is run by Frank, you can phone their helpline on 0800 77 66 00 or alternatively, email them using this link.


The law
The Misuse of Drugs Act 1971

This act is intended to prevent the non-medical use of certain drugs. For this reason it controls not just medicinal drugs (which will also be in the Medicines Act) but also drugs with no current medical uses. Drugs subject to this Act are known as 'controlled' drugs. The main difference from the Medicines Act is that the Misuse of Drugs Act also prohibits unlawful possession. To enforce this law the police have the special powers to stop, detain and search people on 'reasonable suspicion' that they are in possession of a controlled drug.

Offences under the Misuse of Drugs Act can include:

  • Possession of a controlled drug.
  • Possession with intent to supply another person.
  • Production, cultivation or manufacture of controlled drugs.
  • Supplying another person with a controlled drug.
  • Offering to supply another person with a controlled drug.
  • Import or export of controlled drugs.
  • Allowing premises you occupy or manage to be used for the consumption of certain controlled drugs (smoking of cannabis or opium but not use of other controlled drugs) or supply or production of any controlled drug.
  • Certain controlled drugs such as amphetamines, barbiturates, methadone, minor tranquillisers and occasionally heroin can be obtained through a legitimate doctor’s prescription. In such cases their possession is not illegal.


The laws controlling drug use are complicated. The Misuse of Drugs Act (MDA) regulates what are termed controlled drugs. It divides drugs into three classes as follows:

Class A:

These include, cocaine and crack (a form of cocaine), ecstasy, heroin, LSD, methadone, methamphetamine (crystal meth), magic mushrooms containing ester of psilocin and any Class B drug which is injected.

The maximum penalty for possession of a class A drug is 7 years and a fine, for supply the maximum penalty is life and a fine.

Class B:

These include amphetamine (not methamphetamine), barbiturates, codeine and cannabis. All cathinone derivatives, including mephedrone, methylone, methedrone and MDPV were brought under control as Class B substances in 2010.

The maximum penalty for possession of a class B drug is 5 years and a fine, for supply the maximum sentence is 14 years and a fine.

Class C:

These include anabolic steroids, minor tranquillisers, GBL and GHB, and Ketamine.

The maximum sentence for possession of a class C drug is 2 years and a fine, for supply the maximum sentence is 14 years and a fine.

This information is taken from Drugscope's page on UK drug laws. The page and further information can be found here


Drug Fact Files

Cannabis

Name: Cannabis (AKA hash, ganja, weed, marijuana, skunk, blow, spliff, wacky backy etc)

What is it? Cannabis is an hallucinogenic drug, meaning that it can alter people's perceptions of reality. Cannabis can be smoked, eaten, taken as a drink or vapourised.

How is it legally classified? Cannabis is a class B drug. This means that if charged with possession the sentence can be up to 5 years in prison, an unlimited fine or both. Supplying it to someone else can get you fourteen years in prison and an unlimited fine. This includes supplying it to friends, even if you give it away.

Risks: Short term effects include experiencing paranoia, increased heart rate, sickness, lacking focus/concentration, anxiety and thirst. Longer term problems may include tiredness, memory deterioration, a potential increase in the risk of mental illness, psychosis, respiratory problems, reduced sperm count in men and suppressed ovulation in women. Taking cannabis during pregnancy can cause harm to both themselves and their unborn child.

Recognising cannabis addiction: Cannabis users may show physical signs of addiction, including dilated pupils, a dry mouth, bloodshot eyes as well as food cravings and fatigue. Behaviour of addicts may include shying away from social interaction, becoming withdrawn and isolating themselves from others. In terms of psychiatric signs of addiction, individuals may appear depressed, suffer from mood swings, act in an anxious or paranoid manner or experience delusions.

What you can do: If somebody you know has admitted to cannabis addiction, or you believe that they are an addict, the initial step is to talk to them. The individual themselves may not actually be aware of how reliant they have become on the substance. Offer the person your support and encourage them to seek professional help. Reassure them that you are there for them and ensure you do not behave in a non-confrontational way, as this may push the individual further into addiction. If you are recognising signs of addiction in yourself and want to seek help, contact an advice line such as Frank (0800 77 66 00), visit your GP or alternatively search here for your nearest counselling/support centre.
Crystal Meth

Name: Crystal Meth (AKA ice, glass, crystal, amp, white crunch etc.)

What is it? Crystal Meth is a stimulant which can temporarily increase people's level of alertness. It is often smoked, injected or snorted.

How is it legally classified? Crystal Meth is a class A drug. This means that if charged with possession the sentence can be up to 7 years in prison, an unlimited fine or both. Supplying it to someone else can get you life imprisonment and an unlimited fine. This includes supplying it to friends, even if you give it away.

Risks: Short term effects can include convulsions, tremors, increased blood pressure and irregular heart rate, suppressing the individual's appetite, convulsions and tremors, mood swings, feelings of anxiety, paranoia and insomnia as well as violent and unpredictable behaviour. Pregnant women using crystal meth can lead to birth defects to their unborn child such as cleft palate and/or they may give birth prematurely. Crystal meth is known to be both physically and psychologically addictive. Longer term effects include brain damage, strokes, falling into a coma and even death.

Recognising crystal meth addiction: Recognisable physical effects of long term crystal meth use include cracked/decaying teeth, weight loss, body sores, experience of hallucinations and psychosis.

What you can do: If you want to seek help, for either yourself or someone else, you can contact a helpline such as Talk to Frank and/or search online for a local help service (e.g. on this site)
Magic Mushrooms

Name: Magic Mushrooms (AKA magic mushies, shrooms, liberties, liberty cap etc.)

What is it? Magic mushrooms are an hallucinogenic drug, meaning that they alter people's perceptions of reality. They have similar psychadelic effects to LSD and are often eaten raw or can be dried out and stored for later use.

How is it legally classified? Magic mushrooms are a class A drug. This means that if charged with possession the sentence can be up to 7 years in prison, an unlimited fine or both. Supplying it to someone else can get you life imprisonment and an unlimited fine. This includes supplying it to friends, even if you give it away.

Risks: Short term effects include the distortion of sound, objects and colour, some people report mixing up their senses (e.g. "hearing" colours). They can also make you feel more sensitive emotionally, those on a trip lack control over what they are doing as their perception of reality is distorted. Magic mushrooms have been known to cause nausea and stomach cramp when ingested. There is also a great risk of eating poisonous mushrooms by mistake which can result in death. With regards to long term effects to mental health, they can make existing mental illness worsen.

Recognising Magic mushroom addiction: Individuals who take magic mushrooms may appear to be lacking a sense of reality whilst on a trip, they are likely to be very spaced out and detached from the world around them.

What you can do: If somebody you know has admitted to using magic mushrooms regularly, or you believe that they are an addict, the initial step is to talk to them and make your concerns known. Offer the person your support and encourage them to seek professional help. If you are recognising signs of addiction in yourself and want to seek help, contact an advice line such as Frank (0800 77 66 00), visit your GP or alternatively search here for your nearest counselling/support centre.
Mephedrone
Name: Mephedrone (AKA White magic, miaow, Meph, Meow Meow, Drone)

What is it? Mephedrone (sometimes called ‘meow meow’) is a powerful stimulant and is part of a group of drugs that are closely related to the amphetamines, like speed and ecstasy.

How is it legally classified? Mephedrone is a class B drug. This means that if charged with possession the sentence can be up to 5 years in prison, an unlimited fine or both. Supplying it to someone else can get you fourteen years in prison and an unlimited fine. This includes supplying it to friends, even if you give it away.

Risks: There isn't much evidence about mephedrone and it's long term effects as it's quite a new drug but because it is similar to speed and ecstasy the long term effects may well be similar. There have reports of people hospitalised due to the short-term effects. Users have reported blue or cold fingers – this is probably because mephedrone affects the heart and the circulation. Some users have also had severe nosebleeds after snorting mephedrone. There were six deaths involving mephedrone reported in 2011 in England and Wales. Overheating has been a significant cause of deaths when other amphetamine-type drugs, such as ecstasy, have been used along with mephedrone.

Recognising someone using mephedrone: It can make you feel alert, confident, talkative and euphoric – and some people will temporarily feel strong affection to those around them. Mephedrone can make users feel sick, paranoid and anxious, and it can cause vomiting and headaches. It also risks overstimulating your nervous system, which may cause hallucinations, feelings of agitation and even fits. It can reduce your appetite, so you don’t feel hungry.

What you can do: If somebody you know has admitted to using mephedrone regularly, or you believe that they are an addict, the initial step is to talk to them and make your concerns known. Offer the person your support and encourage them to seek professional help. Your GP will also have information about support services in your area.
Opium

Name: Opium (AKA black pill, black russian, Big O, black, black hash)

What is it? Opium is an opiate drug, known for causing users to experience euphoric states. Opium can be smoked, eaten or injected.

How is it legally classified? Opium is a class A drug. This means that if charged with possession the sentence can be up to 7 years in prison, an unlimited fine or both. Supplying it to someone else can get you life imprisonment and an unlimited fine. This includes supplying it to friends, even if you give it away.

Risks: Short term effects of using opium include tiredness, vomiting, impaired vision, decreased libido, a suppressed appetite and increased sweating and urination. With regards to long term risks, an individual's mental health can be affected, they may withdraw themselves from others and users often experience mood swings and an inability to focus on things. In extreme cases, opium use can lead to death.

Recognising opium addiction: Symptoms such as malnourishment, contracted pupils, suffering from severe constipation, weight loss, increased susceptibility to infections, respiratory problems, irregular periods in females, organ damage and psychological health problems are all signs of an addiction to opium.

What you can do: If you suspect that a friend or someone you know is using Opium, or if you are a user yourself, the important thing is to seek help. The best thing to do is speak to the individual and ask if they want to talk about it. Ensure that they know and understand the physical and psychological effects of opium and encourage them to do something about their addiction. A good starting point would be to try and keep them away from situations which would actively encourage this behaviour. The next step is to make contact with a professional, or phone a helpline (see the useful links in the directory above).
Ecstasy
Name: Ecstasy (AKA 'E', MDMA, brownies, pills, love drug, rolex's etc.)


What is it? Ecstasy is an MDMA (stimulant) which is in pill form. E is usually swallowed however it can also be snorted or smoked.

How is it legally classified? Ecstasy is a class A drug. This means that if charged with possession the sentence can be up to 7 years in prison, an unlimited fine or both. Supplying it to someone else can get you life imprisonment and an unlimited fine. This includes supplying it to friends, even if you give it away.

Risks:Short term effects can include states of paranoia, psychosis, anxiety and individuals may experience panic attacks. Physical effects include a higher than usual body temperature, a quickening of their heart beat, dilated pupils, a tingling sensation and dehydration (often caused from prolonged dancing). In the longer term, ecstasy use may lead to liver, kidney and/or heart problems. Other effects include depression, psychological and physical dependency, urine infections, insomnia and a lowered immune system meaning individual's are more likely to experience colds/flu.

Recognising ecstasy addiction: Individual's may begin to rely upon ecstasy to have a good night out, believing that their night will not otherwise be as fun. Those on ecstasy may appear to talk gibberish and not make much sense in conversation. Whilst on ecstasy an individual might experience rapid eye movement and the inability to focus on one thing. They may also appear to be sweating a great deal, experience chills or feel faint.

What you can do: In the case of an overdose, the following symptoms may be apparent: a dramatic increase in heart rate, panic attacks, seizures, muscle cramp, cardiovascular complications, feeling faint, high blood pressure, stroke and a loss of consciousness. If you suspect someone is overdosing then call an ambulance immediately.

With regards to seeking help for yourself or someone you feel has an ecstasy addiction, you are encouraged to seek out a health professional and/or contact a helpline such as Frank. Please see the directory of useful links above for further information.
Ketamine
Name: Ketamine (AKA Vitamin K, Special K, Super K, K, Green, Donkey Dust)

What is it? It’s a powerful general anaesthetic which stops you feeling pain and it’s used for operations on humans and animals. The effects don’t last long, but until they wear off, ketamine can cause a loss of feeling in the body and paralysis of the muscles. It can also lead to you experiencing a distortion of reality.

How is it legally classified? Ketamine is a class C drug. This means that if charged with possession the sentence can be up to tow years in prison and an unlimited fine. Supplying it to someone else can get you fourteen years in prison and an unlimited fine. This includes supplying it to friends, even in you give it away.

Risk: Ketamine can increase your heart rate and blood pressure. It can make you confused, agitated, delirious and disconnected from reality. It can make you feel sick, and it can cause damage to your short and long term memory. Because of the body’s loss of feelings, paralysis of the muscles and the mind’s loss of touch with reality, you can be left vulnerable to hurting yourself or being hurt by others. Because you don't feel pain properly when you've recently taken ketamine, you can injure yourself badly and not know you've done it. Long term use can lead to bladder damage which is incredibly painful and evidence is emerging of liver damage being caused by long term heavy usage.

Recognising ketamine addiction: People who regularly use ketamine can develop a tolerance to it and need to take increasing large doses of it. Many long term users report abdominal pain or "K cramps", whilst others use increasing doses to deal with the bladder pain caused by ketamine making the damage to their bladders worse.Someone on ketamine may appear clumsy, may be hallucinating or may even appear unconscious.

What you can do: If somebody you know has admitted to using ketamine regularly, or you believe that they are an addict, the initial step is to talk to them and make your concerns known. Offer the person your support and encourage them to seek professional help. Your GP will also have information about support services in your area.

In an emergency: When taken in high doses, especially with other substances ketamine can dangerously effect how you breathe and how your heart works. It can also cause unconsciousness and cause people to choke on their vomit. If you suspect someone is unconscious due to taking drugs it's important they get urgent medical attention. Once you have raised the alarm if you feel comfortable, put the person in the recovery position and follow any instructions you're being given over the phone by the emergency services.
Heroin

Name: Heroin (AKA smack, H, horse, Brown and Skag)

What is it? Heroin is an opiate which is made from morphine. Like other opiate drugs heroin is a strong painkiller and can produce feelings of euphoria. It can be injected or smoked.

How is it legally classified? Heroin is a class A drug. This means that if charged with possession the sentence can be up to seven years in prison. Supplying it to someone else can get you life imprisonment and an unlimited fine. This includes supplying it to friends, even if you give it away.

Risk: The main risk of heroin use is that an overdose will be taken, if not treated this can lead to death or induce a coma. The risk of overdose is greater if heroine is taken with other drugs such as alcohol or benzodiazepines. Heroine leads to reduced conscious which can make the user more likely to choke on their vomit which can lead to a serious pneumonia. One of the Long term risks of heroine injection is infection in both the veins that have been used to inject and in some cases the valves in the heart. As with any injectable drug if needles are being shared there is a risk of HIV, Hepatitis B and other viruses that can be transmitted in blood.

Recognising Heroin addiction: Heroine is a highly addictive drug an often people can become addicted quickly. Injections sites maybe noticeable if the drug is being used regularly these may not only be on the arms but all over the body. The person may also seem jittery and constantly on edge, they may lose enthusiasm for things that they used to enjoy. With long term use sometimes unusual markings and discolorations can appear on the skin however this is not always the case.

What you can do: If you or someone that you know requires help with a heroin addiction there are centres around the UK which you can contact for help, a full list can be found here. Your GP will also have information about support services in your area.

In the case of an overdose: If you suspect that you may have overdosed then it is important that you receive medical help as soon as you can so calling an ambulance is extremely important. If you discover someone who you believe may have overdosed call an ambulance and then if you feel comfortable doing so put them in the recovery position. You can learn how to do this by watching this video.

Cocaine

Name: Cocaine (AKA coke, percy, snow, toot, C and Charlie)

What is it? Cocaine is a stimulant which means that it makes the user feel that their mind and body have been sped up. It can be smoked, snorted or injected.

How is it legally classified? Cocaine is a class A drug. This means that if charged with possession the sentence can be up to seven years in prison. Supplying it to someone else can get you life imprisonment and an unlimited fine. This includes supplying it to friends, even if you give it away.

Risk: There are both immediate and long term risks of using cocaine. People sometimes die from taking an overdose of cocaine as this can cause seizures and heart attacks; this is more likely to be a risk if the cocaine is taken with other drugs. When a person takes cocaine they may feel over confident and aggressive and this can put themselves and the people around them in danger. When “coming down” after taking cocaine people may experience flu like symptoms, this crash can sometimes not happen for a number of days. Long term use of cocaine can lead to problems with anxiety, paranoia and panic attacks; this is especially a risk in people who have a family history of mental illness. Other potential consequences of long term use are reduced libido and depression. If you take cocaine while pregnant there is a risk of miscarriage or early labour, babies of regular users may be born addicted to cocaine and have to go through withdrawal.

Recognising cocaine addiction: People who are addicted to cocaine may develop changes in their heart rate and complain of palpitations. You may notice and increase in complaints of nausea and vomiting as well as cold sweats. People who have been using cocaine are often more restless and anxious than they would normally be. The nose is often affected and people may be sniffing a lot and in some cases they may lose part of their nasal septum. As with most addiction one of the key things to look out for is personality change.

What you can do: If you or someone that you know requires help with a cocaine addiction there are centres around the UK which you can contact for help, a full list can be found here. Your GP will also have information about support services in your area. If you believe that you or someone else is in need of urgent medical attention following cocaine use please contact the emergency services .
Crack Cocaine

Name: Crack Cocaine (AKA crack, stones, base, freebases, wash and rocks)

What is it? Crack cocaine is a stimulant which means that it makes the user feel that their mind and body have been sped up. It can be smoked, or injected.

How is it legally classified? Cocaine is a class A drug. This means that if charged with possession the sentence can be up to seven years in prison. Supplying it to someone else can get you life imprisonment and an unlimited fine. This includes supplying it to friends, even if you give it away.

Risk: Many of the risks associated with taking cocaine are also associated with crack cocaine use. Crack cocaine can lead to aggressive and over confident behaviour which can lead to dangerous activity. There is also a risk of heart attack and stroke following crack cocaine use. The come down from crack cocaine use much like cocaine use can be similar to the flu, people may feel weak. Long term use can lead to mental health issues such as anxiety, depression, paranoia and panic attacks as well as increased risk of heart attacks. Further general information on the risks of cocaine and crack cocaine use can be found in the cocaine section.
Crack cocaine also has specific risks associated with it as it is smoked. Crack cocaine users may develop painful and difficulty breathing, they may start bleeding into their lungs and cause long term lung damage. It is more common for crack cocaine users to start using heroine to ease their cravings and this often leads to the users also becoming addicted to heroin.

Recognising cocaine addiction: People who are addicted to crack may develop personality changes, they may become visibly more anxious and isolated than they had previously been. They also may complain of palpitations and have visible cold sweats. They may also experience weight loss. One of the potential signs specific to crack cocaine use is that they may develop a wheeze, cough or general problems breathing.

What you can do: If you or someone that you know requires help with a crack cocaine addiction there are centres around the UK which you can contact for help, a full list can be found here. Your GP will also have information about support services in your area. If you believe that you or someone else is in need of urgent medical attention following crack cocaine use please contact the emergency services.
LSD

Name: LSD (AKA acid, lightening flash, L, Lucy)

What is it? LSD is a hallucinogenic drug which means that when this is taken people experiance and altered sense of reality. It is taken on a piece of edible paper.

How is it legally classified? LSD is a class A drug. This means that if charged with possession the sentence can be up to seven years in prison. Supplying it to someone else can get you life imprisonment and an unlimited fine. This includes supplying it to friends, even if you give it away.

Risk: The main risks associated with LSD are when someone has a “bad trip” this is when they have negative hallucinations. This can causes people to get very frightened and they can sometimes put themselves in danger. If someone is depressed or is just feeling unhappy LSD can sometimes make these feelings worse and people have been known to harm themselves during a bad trip. Following use of LSD people may have flashbacks to bad trips. This usually occurs in the first few weeks after the trip but can go on for years afterwards. If someone has pre-existing mental health issues then there may be longer term implications of the drug use, LSD can also trigger an underlying mental illness in some people who may not know that they had it.

Recognising LSD addiction: While it is not thought possible to become physically addicted to LSD it is possible to become psychologically addicted. People may start using the drug more for its psychological effects and become distracted in everyday life.

What you can do: If you or someone that you know requires help following the use of LSD there are centres around the UK which you can contact for help, a full list can be found here. Your GP will also have information about support services in your area. If you believe that you or someone else is in need of urgent medical attention following LSD use, please contact the emergency services.
PCP
Name: PCP (AKA angel dust, supergrass, killer weed, embalming fluid and rocket fuel)

What is it? PCP is a hallucinogenic drug which means that it alters peoples perceptions of reality. It can come in pill, liquid or powder form and can be snorted, swallowed, injected or smoked.

How is it legally classified? PCP is a class A drug. This means that if charged with possession the sentence can be up to seven years in prison. Supplying it to someone else can get you life imprisonment and an unlimited fine. This includes supplying it to friends, even if you give it away.

Risk: PCP creates symptoms similar to schizophrenia, it can cause the user to feel strong and invulnerable. It also creates extreme image distortion. The user can be violent and therefore a danger to themselves or those who are around them. It is not uncommon for users to become depressed and even suicidal whilst using the drugs. Following PCP use users may have unpleasant flashbacks. When PCP is used during teenage years it can negatively affect the hormones which are associated with normal growth and development. This can lead to a halt in the learning process. High doses of PCP can lead to seizures, coma and in some cases death. Long term users of PCP may develop memory loss, speech and though difficulty and depression.

Recognising PCP addiction: As with most addiction one of the key things to look out for with is personality change. People who are using PCP may also display symptoms similar to schizophrenia so they may become detached and disorientated and their behaviour may become erratic.

What you can do: If you or someone that you know requires help following the use of PCP there are centres around the UK which you can contact for help, a full list can be found here. Your GP will also have information about support services in your area. If you believe that you or someone else is in need of urgent medical attention following PCP use, please contact the emergency services.
Speed

Name: Speed (AKA: whizz, paste, billy, base, amphetamine)

What is it? Speed is a stimulant drug that people take to keep themselves awake energised and alert.
How is it legally classified? Speed is a class B drug. This means that if charged with possession the sentence can be up to 5 years in prison, an unlimited fine or both. Supplying it to someone else can get you fourteen years in prison and an unlimited fine. This includes supplying it to friends, even if you give it away. If speed is prepared for injection it becomes a class A drug which can attract harsher penalties for possession or supply.

Risks: Taking speed does involve risks. Depending on how much you've taken it can be hard to relax or sleep. The comedown can last for several days making it hard to concentrate or learn. It puts a strain on your heart, so it's not advisable for people with heart conditions to take it, users have dies from taking too much. Mixing speed with antidepressants or alcohol has been known to kill people. Taking a lot of speed can give your immune system a battering meaning you'll pick up more sore throats and colds. It can also lead to anxiety, depression, paranoia and even psychotic episodes.

Recognising speed addiction: When using speed people can appear "up", excited and chatty. They can also appear overactive, agitated or even acutely psychotic. The high with speed is usually followed by a long comedown where users can feel tired, irritable and depressed.

What you can do: If somebody you know has admitted to speed addiction, or you believe that they are an addict, the initial step is to talk to them. The individual themselves may not actually be aware of how reliant they have become on the substance. Offer the person your support and encourage them to seek professional help. Reassure them that you are there for them and ensure you do not behave in a non-confrontational way, as this may push the individual further into addiction. If you are recognising signs of addiction in yourself and want to seek help, contact an advice line such as Frank (0800 77 66 00), visit your GP or alternatively search here for your nearest counselling/support centre.
Alcohol

Risks:It is sometimes easy to forget that alcohol is also a drug which can be very dangerous. While it is legal to drink alcohol in the UK when you turn 18 it is important that you remember the risks associated with alcohol consumptions. The immediate risks are as a result of being intoxicated, this may change your behaviour and lead to you take risks that you otherwise wouldn't and become a danger to yourself or others. You may become aggressive and lash out at the people around you which could cause you to hurt yourself and also potentially get you in trouble with the law. Longer term it is possible to become addicted to alcohol which can lead to a large number of potential health risks including cancer and liver disease. Binge drinking has been linked to memory problems in adults and it is likely that the full dangers of binge drinking will not be known for a number of years yet.

What can I do?One of the most important things is that you try to stick to the government recommendations for alcohol consumption, this is 21 units of alcohol a week for an adult man and 14 for an adult woman. A unit of alcohol is half a pint of weak beer or half an alcopop. If you feel that you or a friend have a problem with alcohol the recovernow have a helpline which you can call on 0845 6306530. If you feel that you may have drank too much or you and your friend need urgent help as a result of alcohol please contact the emergency services.

A useful website for alcohol related concerns is the Alcoholics Anonymous GB website
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