English language paper 2 2021

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gnir llub
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#1
Report Thread starter 8 months ago
#1
does anyone know questions (q1,2,3,4 and5) for this source?
i would appreciate the assistance if someone do?
Source A
Source A is an extract from Touching the Void, in which experienced climber Joe Simpson describes how he and fellow climber Simon Yates scaled a 21 000 foot mountain in Peru. On the way down, Joe fell and broke his leg. In this extract, Joe explains how, because of his broken leg, Simon had to lower him down the mountain using a rope.

1 The col was exposed and windy. Directly beneath us the glacier we had walked up five days ago curved away towards the crevasses which led to base camp, nearly 3 000 feet below us. It would take many long lowerings, but it was all downhill, and we had lost the
4 sense of hopelessness that had invaded us at the ice cliff.
5 ‘What time is it?’ Simon asked.
‘Just gone four. We don’t have much time, do we?’
I could see him weighing up the possibilities. I wanted to carry on down, but it was Simon’s decision. I waited for him to make up his mind.
‘I think we should keep going,’ he said at last.
10 Simon let me slide faster than I had expected and, despite my cries of alarm and pain, he had kept the pace of descent going. I stopped shouting to him after fifty feet. The rising wind and continuous avalanches drowned out all communications. Instead I concentrated on keeping my leg clear of the snow. It was an impossible task. Despite lying on my good leg, the right boot snagged in the snow as the weight of my body pushed down. Each
15 abrupt jerk caused searing pain in my knee. I sobbed and gasped, swore at the snow and the cold, and most of all at Simon. At the change-over point, I hopped on to my left leg, trying to think the pain away. It ebbed slowly, leaving a dreadful throbbing ache and a leaden tiredness.
The tugs came again far too soon, and carelessly I slumped against the rope and let myself 20 go. The drop went on until I could bear it no longer, yet there was nothing that I could do to bring the agony to an end. Howling and screaming for Simon to stop achieved nothing; the
blame had to lie somewhere, so I swore Simon’s character to the devil.
23 The terrible sliding stopped, and I hung silently against the slope. Three faint tugs trembled the taut rope, and I hopped up on to my leg. A wave of nausea and pain swept over me. I
25 was glad of the freezing blasts of snow biting into my face. My head cleared as I waited for the burning to subside from my knee. Several times I had felt it twist sideways when my boot snagged. There would be a flare of agony as the knee kinked back, and parts within the joint seemed to shear past each other with a sickening gristly crunch. I had barely ceased sobbing before my boot snagged again. At the end my leg shook uncontrollably. I
30 tried to stop it shaking, but the harder I tried, the more it shook. I pressed my face into the
31 snow, gritted my teeth, and waited. At last it eased.
Simon had already started to climb down. I looked up but failed to make out where he was. I began digging Simon’s belay* seat. It was warming work and distracted attention from my knee. When I looked up again Simon could be seen descending quickly.
35 ‘At this rate we should be down by nine o’clock,’ he said cheerfully.

‘I hope so.’ I said no more. It wouldn’t help to harp on about how I felt.
‘Right, let’s do it again.’ He had seated himself in the hole and had the ropes ready for another lowering.
‘You’re not hanging around, are you?’ 40 ‘Nothing to wait for. Come on.’
He was still grinning, and his confidence was infectious. Who said one man can’t rescue another, I thought. We had changed from climbing to rescue, and the partnership had worked just as effectively. We hadn’t dwelt on the accident. There had been an element of uncertainty at first, but as soon as we had started to act positively everything had come together
45 ‘Okay, ready when you are,’ I said, lying down on my side again. ‘Slow down a bit this time. You’ll have my leg off otherwise.’
He didn’t seem to hear me for I went down at an even faster pace than before, and the hammering torture began again with a vengeance. My optimism evaporated

Source B
In 1899, British explorer Gertrude Bell set out to climb one of the most dangerous mountains in the Alps, the Meije. Source B is an extract from the letter she sent home describing the climb.
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CheezyGeek
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#2
Report 8 months ago
#2
Is this what you're looking for? (are you looking for the source or it's answers?)

from either
https://qualifications.pearson.com/c...e_20160607.pdf

https://www.astreadearne.org/wp-cont...-the-Meije.pdf


I don't know how to shorten the link but Source A is from the book Touching the Void written by Joe Simpson (link below from google books, the source is from Chapter 5 onwards)

https://books.google.com/books?id=Ts...cliff.&f=false

As for Source B, I found this extract to be closest to the one in the paper (including some errors)

http://gertrudebell.ncl.ac.uk/letter...letter_id=1071

The actual letters can be found here (if that's what you're looking for):

http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks04/0400341h.html
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CheezyGeek
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#3
Report 8 months ago
#3
(Original post by gnir llub)
does anyone know questions (q1,2,3,4 and5) for this source?
i would appreciate the assistance if someone do?
Source A
Source A is an extract from Touching the Void, in which experienced climber Joe Simpson describes how he and fellow climber Simon Yates scaled a 21 000 foot mountain in Peru. On the way down, Joe fell and broke his leg. In this extract, Joe explains how, because of his broken leg, Simon had to lower him down the mountain using a rope.

1 The col was exposed and windy. Directly beneath us the glacier we had walked up five days ago curved away towards the crevasses which led to base camp, nearly 3 000 feet below us. It would take many long lowerings, but it was all downhill, and we had lost the
4 sense of hopelessness that had invaded us at the ice cliff.
5 ‘What time is it?’ Simon asked.
‘Just gone four. We don’t have much time, do we?’
I could see him weighing up the possibilities. I wanted to carry on down, but it was Simon’s decision. I waited for him to make up his mind.
‘I think we should keep going,’ he said at last.
10 Simon let me slide faster than I had expected and, despite my cries of alarm and pain, he had kept the pace of descent going. I stopped shouting to him after fifty feet. The rising wind and continuous avalanches drowned out all communications. Instead I concentrated on keeping my leg clear of the snow. It was an impossible task. Despite lying on my good leg, the right boot snagged in the snow as the weight of my body pushed down. Each
15 abrupt jerk caused searing pain in my knee. I sobbed and gasped, swore at the snow and the cold, and most of all at Simon. At the change-over point, I hopped on to my left leg, trying to think the pain away. It ebbed slowly, leaving a dreadful throbbing ache and a leaden tiredness.
The tugs came again far too soon, and carelessly I slumped against the rope and let myself 20 go. The drop went on until I could bear it no longer, yet there was nothing that I could do to bring the agony to an end. Howling and screaming for Simon to stop achieved nothing; the
blame had to lie somewhere, so I swore Simon’s character to the devil.
23 The terrible sliding stopped, and I hung silently against the slope. Three faint tugs trembled the taut rope, and I hopped up on to my leg. A wave of nausea and pain swept over me. I
25 was glad of the freezing blasts of snow biting into my face. My head cleared as I waited for the burning to subside from my knee. Several times I had felt it twist sideways when my boot snagged. There would be a flare of agony as the knee kinked back, and parts within the joint seemed to shear past each other with a sickening gristly crunch. I had barely ceased sobbing before my boot snagged again. At the end my leg shook uncontrollably. I
30 tried to stop it shaking, but the harder I tried, the more it shook. I pressed my face into the
31 snow, gritted my teeth, and waited. At last it eased.
Simon had already started to climb down. I looked up but failed to make out where he was. I began digging Simon’s belay* seat. It was warming work and distracted attention from my knee. When I looked up again Simon could be seen descending quickly.
35 ‘At this rate we should be down by nine o’clock,’ he said cheerfully.

‘I hope so.’ I said no more. It wouldn’t help to harp on about how I felt.
‘Right, let’s do it again.’ He had seated himself in the hole and had the ropes ready for another lowering.
‘You’re not hanging around, are you?’ 40 ‘Nothing to wait for. Come on.’
He was still grinning, and his confidence was infectious. Who said one man can’t rescue another, I thought. We had changed from climbing to rescue, and the partnership had worked just as effectively. We hadn’t dwelt on the accident. There had been an element of uncertainty at first, but as soon as we had started to act positively everything had come together
45 ‘Okay, ready when you are,’ I said, lying down on my side again. ‘Slow down a bit this time. You’ll have my leg off otherwise.’
He didn’t seem to hear me for I went down at an even faster pace than before, and the hammering torture began again with a vengeance. My optimism evaporated

Source B
In 1899, British explorer Gertrude Bell set out to climb one of the most dangerous mountains in the Alps, the Meije. Source B is an extract from the letter she sent home describing the climb.
my bad, read the whole thing wrong :/


Questions for Source A:


Using the details given by the writer, describe the
situation in which Joe finds himself.
How effectively does he describe his physical
condition and suffering?
Explore the range of emotions that he describes
in this extract. What causes the shifts in his
feelings?
What does this account imply about Joe
Simpson’s character?


from here:
https://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resourc...-87002-RSB.PDF
and
https://studylib.net/doc/7745184/tou...am-preparation
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CheezyGeek
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#4
Report 8 months ago
#4
(Original post by CheezyGeek)
my bad, read the whole thing wrong :/


Questions for Source A:


Using the details given by the writer, describe the
situation in which Joe finds himself.
How effectively does he describe his physical
condition and suffering?
Explore the range of emotions that he describes
in this extract. What causes the shifts in his
feelings?
What does this account imply about Joe
Simpson’s character?


from here:
https://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resourc...-87002-RSB.PDF
and
https://studylib.net/doc/7745184/tou...am-preparation
the extract, along with an elaboration of the answers for the questions can be found here:

https://assets.pearsonglobalschools....gB_Sample2.pdf
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CheezyGeek
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#5
Report 8 months ago
#5
(Original post by gnir llub)
does anyone know questions (q1,2,3,4 and5) for this source?
i would appreciate the assistance if someone do?
Source A
Source A is an extract from Touching the Void, in which experienced climber Joe Simpson describes how he and fellow climber Simon Yates scaled a 21 000 foot mountain in Peru. On the way down, Joe fell and broke his leg. In this extract, Joe explains how, because of his broken leg, Simon had to lower him down the mountain using a rope.

1 The col was exposed and windy. Directly beneath us the glacier we had walked up five days ago curved away towards the crevasses which led to base camp, nearly 3 000 feet below us. It would take many long lowerings, but it was all downhill, and we had lost the
4 sense of hopelessness that had invaded us at the ice cliff.
5 ‘What time is it?’ Simon asked.
‘Just gone four. We don’t have much time, do we?’
I could see him weighing up the possibilities. I wanted to carry on down, but it was Simon’s decision. I waited for him to make up his mind.
‘I think we should keep going,’ he said at last.
10 Simon let me slide faster than I had expected and, despite my cries of alarm and pain, he had kept the pace of descent going. I stopped shouting to him after fifty feet. The rising wind and continuous avalanches drowned out all communications. Instead I concentrated on keeping my leg clear of the snow. It was an impossible task. Despite lying on my good leg, the right boot snagged in the snow as the weight of my body pushed down. Each
15 abrupt jerk caused searing pain in my knee. I sobbed and gasped, swore at the snow and the cold, and most of all at Simon. At the change-over point, I hopped on to my left leg, trying to think the pain away. It ebbed slowly, leaving a dreadful throbbing ache and a leaden tiredness.
The tugs came again far too soon, and carelessly I slumped against the rope and let myself 20 go. The drop went on until I could bear it no longer, yet there was nothing that I could do to bring the agony to an end. Howling and screaming for Simon to stop achieved nothing; the
blame had to lie somewhere, so I swore Simon’s character to the devil.
23 The terrible sliding stopped, and I hung silently against the slope. Three faint tugs trembled the taut rope, and I hopped up on to my leg. A wave of nausea and pain swept over me. I
25 was glad of the freezing blasts of snow biting into my face. My head cleared as I waited for the burning to subside from my knee. Several times I had felt it twist sideways when my boot snagged. There would be a flare of agony as the knee kinked back, and parts within the joint seemed to shear past each other with a sickening gristly crunch. I had barely ceased sobbing before my boot snagged again. At the end my leg shook uncontrollably. I
30 tried to stop it shaking, but the harder I tried, the more it shook. I pressed my face into the
31 snow, gritted my teeth, and waited. At last it eased.
Simon had already started to climb down. I looked up but failed to make out where he was. I began digging Simon’s belay* seat. It was warming work and distracted attention from my knee. When I looked up again Simon could be seen descending quickly.
35 ‘At this rate we should be down by nine o’clock,’ he said cheerfully.

‘I hope so.’ I said no more. It wouldn’t help to harp on about how I felt.
‘Right, let’s do it again.’ He had seated himself in the hole and had the ropes ready for another lowering.
‘You’re not hanging around, are you?’ 40 ‘Nothing to wait for. Come on.’
He was still grinning, and his confidence was infectious. Who said one man can’t rescue another, I thought. We had changed from climbing to rescue, and the partnership had worked just as effectively. We hadn’t dwelt on the accident. There had been an element of uncertainty at first, but as soon as we had started to act positively everything had come together
45 ‘Okay, ready when you are,’ I said, lying down on my side again. ‘Slow down a bit this time. You’ll have my leg off otherwise.’
He didn’t seem to hear me for I went down at an even faster pace than before, and the hammering torture began again with a vengeance. My optimism evaporated

Source B
In 1899, British explorer Gertrude Bell set out to climb one of the most dangerous mountains in the Alps, the Meije. Source B is an extract from the letter she sent home describing the climb.
I found this!!! This is it!! Ignore everything else ToT


https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=7001881
Last edited by CheezyGeek; 8 months ago
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gnir llub
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#6
Report Thread starter 8 months ago
#6
(Original post by CheezyGeek)
I found this!!! This is it!! Ignore everything else ToT


https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=7001881
thank you
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Mitchymitcith
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#7
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#7
(Original post by CheezyGeek)
I found this!!! This is it!! Ignore everything else ToT


https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=7001881
This link don’t work anymore bro can you send me what was on it ?
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hehe69
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#8
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#8
(Original post by CheezyGeek)
I found this!!! This is it!! Ignore everything else ToT


https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=7001881
the link isnt working now... please may you send me what was on it? thank you so much!!!
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Ale_A6014
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#9
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#9
(Original post by hehe69)
the link isnt working now... please may you send me what was on it? thank you so much!!!
(Original post by Mitchymitcith)
This link don’t work anymore bro can you send me what was on it ?
Did you found out what was it saying?
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nizzma
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#10
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#10
what did it say??
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nizzma
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#11
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#11
(Original post by Ale_A6014)
Did you found out what was it saying?
what did it say???
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chil3e
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#12
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#12
(Original post by nizzma)
what did it say???
what was it
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