Qxi.xli
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I'm doing my A-levels in Maths, Further maths and Physics. I'm deciding between a Physics and an Engineering degree, but are there any other degrees that are open to me with those subjects which would lead to even higher paid jobs? Thanks haha x
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glassalice
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Applied golf studies?
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Qxi.xli
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(Original post by glassalice)
Applied golf studies?
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user342
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(Original post by Qxi.xli)
I'm doing my A-levels in Maths, Further maths and Physics. I'm deciding between a Physics and an Engineering degree, but are there any other degrees that are open to me with those subjects which would lead to even higher paid jobs? Thanks haha x
Something in finance, or data science, computer science/software engineering
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artful_lounger
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Your degree subject won't make as much difference as what relevant work experience you get during that degree to make yourself employable, it will just open or close certain doors (e.g. engineering roles, certain physical sciences related positions) which may or may not be "the highest paying" roles anyway. Bear in mind as well that income averages for different degrees/roles can be misleading. Some of the mean averages can be skewed heavily by for example, some people getting very large bonuses, while the modal salary is very low, or a small number of graduates from a small number of unis going into very lucrative roles while most do not.

Also some jobs pay less upfront but have a lot of benefits that are worth a great deal in the long run. For example the civil service has an excellent pension plan I understand, and also often has a lot of options for flexible working arrangements. The monetary value for your pension over a life in the civil service could well outweigh higher starting grad salaries or large but inconsistent bonuses (particularly after taxes), and the quality of life from possible flexible working arrangements is beyond monetary value.
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Qxi.xli
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Your degree subject won't make as much difference as what relevant work experience you get during that degree to make yourself employable, it will just open or close certain doors (e.g. engineering roles, certain physical sciences related positions) which may or may not be "the highest paying" roles anyway. Bear in mind as well that income averages for different degrees/roles can be misleading. Some of the mean averages can be skewed heavily by for example, some people getting very large bonuses, while the modal salary is very low, or a small number of graduates from a small number of unis going into very lucrative roles while most do not.

Also some jobs pay less upfront but have a lot of benefits that are worth a great deal in the long run. For example the civil service has an excellent pension plan I understand, and also often has a lot of options for flexible working arrangements. The monetary value for your pension over a life in the civil service could well outweigh higher starting grad salaries or large but inconsistent bonuses (particularly after taxes), and the quality of life from possible flexible working arrangements is beyond monetary value.
tysmm x this is really useful
(Original post by user342)
Something in finance, or data science, computer science/software engineering
Last edited by Qxi.xli; 1 month ago
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161BMW
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(Original post by Qxi.xli)
I'm doing my A-levels in Maths, Further maths and Physics. I'm deciding between a Physics and an Engineering degree, but are there any other degrees that are open to me with those subjects which would lead to even higher paid jobs? Thanks haha x
I probably wouldn’t just base career choice on pay.

With those subjects you could do quite a lot
Most branches of Engineering
Physics
Maths
Computing
Maths and Computing
Economics possibly
Actuarial Science
Accounting
Medicine possibly you might need Chemistry
Architecture not sure
Business type degrees possibly
Or if the subject doesn’t offer direct route there may be a foundation course.
Last edited by 161BMW; 4 weeks ago
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Johnny ~
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It's the career that pays, not the degree. Even within STEM careers, you typically see a willingness to hire candidates who have a variety of degrees provided that they have the relevant skills and knowledge.
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mnot
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The stereotypical jobs are consulting, front office banking, accounting, big tech, energy.

Tbh with engineering or physics you can do most of these anyway.
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alex282
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It's much more important to do what you are interested in and can see yourself enjoying because you will be doing it for the majority of your life. It's also important to find a good balance though, you don't want to end up getting a big student debt to end up with an engineering job at a small firm paying near minimum wage if you hate it.

If you want the most money then something financial is probably the best paid. Can you see yourself working long stressful hours in an office counting numbers for 40+ hours a week for most of your life?

Software related roles can also be well paid but that could always change since programming can be outsourced to other countries for example.

Engineering gives you a vast choice of options but it's not always that great, especially in the UK. I done a masters degree in electrical engineering and I quickly left the industry because I couldn't stand the corporate office life of sitting at a desk all week repositioning symbols and doing data entry on Excel. Some people in my class got better jobs which had more practical elements and were better paid but it's very competitive these days. I wanted to work in the energy industry at a big company but had no chance even with an MEng and various work experience. If I could go back I would rather be an electrician at a factory as I used to have a job assisting them and found it much better than the office.

I would only advise physics if you really have a passion for the subject because usually you will probably need to stick at it until PHD level. You also need to be prepared to limit yourself to living near areas with research jobs or work as an academic in a university
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