Anthony..
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If I am currently in a Secondary school in England, what is my next step towards the goal of living and working in the USA as any type of doctor?
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ecolier
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(Original post by Anthony..)
If I am currently in a Secondary school in England, what is my next step towards the goal of living and working in the USA as any type of doctor?
Best to aim to study in the US if you want to practise in the US.

Over there, medicine is a graduate entry only qualification so you'd need to do a "pre-med" degree first.

artful_lounger will be able to advise.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by ecolier)
Best to aim to study in the US if you want to practise in the US.

Over there, medicine is a graduate entry only qualification so you'd need to do a "pre-med" degree first.

artful_lounger will be able to advise.
Thanks

(Original post by Anthony..)
If I am currently in a Secondary school in England, what is my next step towards the goal of living and working in the USA as any type of doctor?
You need to get a medical degree of some sort first. You can either get a UK MBBS then take the USMLE and try to apply to residency programmes through The Match there, or do an MBBS then get a US MD, or get any first degree then a US MD. To apply to MD programmes you need to a) have studied science in an accredited US college for 1 year and b) usually have taken a specific pre-med curriculum in your course, which includes a physics, biology, general chemistry, and organic chemistry sequence, plus usually biochemistry now.

The premed curriculum is essentially impossible to achieve in the UK outside of Cambridge NatSci or maybe Southampton NatSci if timetabling isn't a problem there. Some medical schools are less prescriptive about the pre-med curriculum and don't necessarily require those specific classes if you can demonstrate you are prepared for the scientific content generally (e.g. I think Stanford has this) but most do require the standard courses. Also all require you to have studied science classes in the US for at least one year, so you either need to have done a year abroad or take some kind of postgrad qualification there (a postbacc programme, a masters, something).

If you're an IMG (international medical graduate) you will find it very hard to get matched though outside of very uncompetitive programmes often in non-competitive regions (e.g. family medicine in rural Idaho or something). If you have a US MD then I think this helps some, but you are still at a disadvantage without a US green card as you would presumably be relying on your employer to sponsor you for a working visa, and the US working visa requirements include that the employer needs to have shown there were no suitable qualified American applicants for that post. For competitive specialties (and not just e.g. surgical specialties, radiology, or urology - any specialty where there are more people applying than posts available really) you will thus essentially be unable to get a work visa sponsored. So unless you get a US green card, you can probably rule out working in any major cities (certainly most coastal cities) and in competitive specialties.

Your best bet is to probably aim for a medical degree in the UK in the first instance, as then you have working in the UK as a doctor as a backup, since presumably working as a doctor at all is your main objective. Then you need to figure out how to translate that to working and living in the US, which has a lot of pitfalls and requires a lot of planning (unless you marry a US citizen, which shortcuts some of that). That part of the equation isn't really something you'll be able to do until you have a degree and a good chunk of money saved so is really something you're going to be looking into after graduating and working for a couple years.

You might be able to apply from the final year of medical school in the UK but you would probably have very limited options as above (also you might be required to have completed the FY1 here anyway, as that is the equivalent of most other countries final year of medical school as I understand). Also as I understand if you don't complete FY1 here within a couple years of graduating you can never be a fully licensed doctor in the UK, so you might as well plan to do the foundation programme and maybe spend a year locuming to save money while you make your application(s) to the US. Being able to work as a doctor in the UK might be preferable as a backup in case you needed or wanted to return to the UK at some point, e.g. family/caring requirements require you to settle down in the UK, you get sick of watching patients go away to die because their insurance can't cover the cost of their care, etc.
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Democracy
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(Original post by Anthony..)
If I am currently in a Secondary school in England, what is my next step towards the goal of living and working in the USA as any type of doctor?
https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wik...ine_in_the_USA

(Relatively up to date figures included).
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Anthony..
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Thanks



You need to get a medical degree of some sort first. You can either get a UK MBBS then take the USMLE and try to apply to residency programmes through The Match there, or do an MBBS then get a US MD, or get any first degree then a US MD. To apply to MD programmes you need to a) have studied science in an accredited US college for 1 year and b) usually have taken a specific pre-med curriculum in your course, which includes a physics, biology, general chemistry, and organic chemistry sequence, plus usually biochemistry now.

The premed curriculum is essentially impossible to achieve in the UK outside of Cambridge NatSci or maybe Southampton NatSci if timetabling isn't a problem there. Some medical schools are less prescriptive about the pre-med curriculum and don't necessarily require those specific classes if you can demonstrate you are prepared for the scientific content generally (e.g. I think Stanford has this) but most do require the standard courses. Also all require you to have studied science classes in the US for at least one year, so you either need to have done a year abroad or take some kind of postgrad qualification there (a postbacc programme, a masters, something).

If you're an IMG (international medical graduate) you will find it very hard to get matched though outside of very uncompetitive programmes often in non-competitive regions (e.g. family medicine in rural Idaho or something). If you have a US MD then I think this helps some, but you are still at a disadvantage without a US green card as you would presumably be relying on your employer to sponsor you for a working visa, and the US working visa requirements include that the employer needs to have shown there were no suitable qualified American applicants for that post. For competitive specialties (and not just e.g. surgical specialties, radiology, or urology - any specialty where there are more people applying than posts available really) you will thus essentially be unable to get a work visa sponsored. So unless you get a US green card, you can probably rule out working in any major cities (certainly most coastal cities) and in competitive specialties.

Your best bet is to probably aim for a medical degree in the UK in the first instance, as then you have working in the UK as a doctor as a backup, since presumably working as a doctor at all is your main objective. Then you need to figure out how to translate that to working and living in the US, which has a lot of pitfalls and requires a lot of planning (unless you marry a US citizen, which shortcuts some of that). That part of the equation isn't really something you'll be able to do until you have a degree and a good chunk of money saved so is really something you're going to be looking into after graduating and working for a couple years.

You might be able to apply from the final year of medical school in the UK but you would probably have very limited options as above (also you might be required to have completed the FY1 here anyway, as that is the equivalent of most other countries final year of medical school as I understand). Also as I understand if you don't complete FY1 here within a couple years of graduating you can never be a fully licensed doctor in the UK, so you might as well plan to do the foundation programme and maybe spend a year locuming to save money while you make your application(s) to the US. Being able to work as a doctor in the UK might be preferable as a backup in case you needed or wanted to return to the UK at some point, e.g. family/caring requirements require you to settle down in the UK, you get sick of watching patients go away to die because their insurance can't cover the cost of their care, etc.
>You need to get a medical degree of some sort first.

How about before that? Like I said, I'm in a secondary school in England, and I was seeking to find what my immediate next step should be after finishing secondary school.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Anthony..)
>You need to get a medical degree of some sort first.

How about before that? Like I said, I'm in a secondary school in England, and I was seeking to find what my immediate next step should be after finishing secondary school.
Did you read the rest of my post?

Because I pretty clearly, immediately after that quoted sentence, wrote what the route to that would be.
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