Medical Careers have a good salary but IS NOT a doctor

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bkjknkjkbj
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Hi I am really interested in the healthcare sector and would really like to eventually work in it but the stupidly long hours and the years upon years of training that are needed are really off-putting. Could someone please tell me some careers in healthcare that has better hours and a higher starting salary - I would be most grateful as this is a field which I really enjoy learning about?
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HumbleBee_x
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Physician's associate, starting salary is above 30-40k.
Not so sure about the hours.
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artful_lounger
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Other than the obvious answer of "head of a hospital" which probably pays a fair bit, but isn't actually a clinical role, physician associate is probably the thing that comes to mind. I think PAs start on Band 7 AfC, and my impression from what other people have written on here seems to be they tend to work more 9-5 (or maybe 8-4/10-6) type hours and seem less often to need to hang around to finish things up at the end of their shift?

It's still a long-ish educational process however, if you go the usual masters route for training, which is then 3 year undergrad bioscience degree then 2 year PA masters course, which is the minimum length of time for a medical degree anyway. UCLan and Reading have undergrad integrated masters courses that are only 4 years long though.
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bkjknkjkbj
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Thank you for the suggestion. Any others?
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Mesopotamian.
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What parts of healthcare are you actually (or not) interested in? There’s no point in giving recommendations if you have no interest in that specific field.
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bkjknkjkbj
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(Original post by Mesopotamian.)
What parts of healthcare are you actually (or not) interested in? There’s no point in giving recommendations if you have no interest in that specific field.
Basically everything but the main reason why I don't what to be a doctor is the insane amount of time it takes to even become a junior doctor and a the working hours.
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becausethenight
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Pretty much all healthcare careers will have some element of unsociable hours and/or not investment banking levels of pay.
As said you will also need to be interested in it to stick it out for decades - have you looked at https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...th-professions or something similar already to narrow down? You could also do management or IT etc and aim to work in the NHS but it isn't really 'healthcare'.
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Mesopotamian.
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(Original post by bkjknkjkbj)
Basically everything but the main reason why I don't what to be a doctor is the insane amount of time it takes to even become a junior doctor and a the working hours.
I wouldn’t say 5 years is an “insane” amount of time...it’s only 2 years in addition to a normal degree.


Anyway, other healthcare degrees include pharmacy, optometry, nursing and physicians associate.
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ecolier
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(Original post by bkjknkjkbj)
Hi I am really interested in the healthcare sector and would really like to eventually work in it but the stupidly long hours and the years upon years of training that are needed are really off-putting. Could someone please tell me some careers in healthcare that has better hours and a higher starting salary - I would be most grateful as this is a field which I really enjoy learning about?
Please don't post in the Medicine forum is you literally don't want to do Medicine, I have moved your thread to the Healthcare forum which is much more appropriate.

Start by thinking about what you don't want to do... remember that money as a motivation is never a good thing for healthcare related careers.

If you are motivated economically, why not do something like investment banking etc.? I would also agree with the above that 5 years to become a junior doctor isn't particularly long.
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RambleAmple
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I might not be an expert but I think you may be searching for pretty much the impossible - you want less time than it takes to become a doctor (so less than 5 years for the medicine undergrad?) to get to a field where you are paid even more for doing less hours, unfortunately I don't think there is a healthcare career that ticks ALL of those boxes. Possibly more the business aspects if you own a hospital/are high up in management or something, but then I doubt that is a simple jump that takes less than 5 years. Unfortunately of actual healthcare careers I believe doctors are probably the best paid (and that varies depending on what type of doctor, but you're trying to rule out doctors in any form), so there probably isn't another one which will tick the 'gets paid more' box. Also if you don't want to work as many hours you won't get paid as much either, but some have mentioned above a few careers which have more sociable hours like physicians associate. But as ecolier said, healthcare isn't something you do for the money and you should be prepared for the possibility of not always working regular hours. Possibly look into science degrees and then doing things like lab work/research for medical things? The pay won't be near a doctors likely but it's another route to consider I suppose, I looked into it as a backup for vet med for a little while but it's not for me.
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mnot
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Well people who create healthcare patents can make millions, typically working in medical research.

Although most people who work in healthcare r&d won’t be reeling off highly lucrative patents.
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one_two_three
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A degree in medicine and become a GP. Much more sociable hours and the potential for a very large salary.
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pokoloco123
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like many other have mentioned, there is a good medical career you can get into with excellent job prospects; a physician associate. you can complete an undergraduate or post graduate degree in Physician associate studies. however, most training to become a physician associate, is at postgraduate diploma (PGDip)/Masters level. In order to get a place on a postgraduate course you'll usually need a first degree or equivalent in life or healthcare sciences.

Typical degree subjects include:


allied health degree (e.g. occupational therapy, diagnostic/therapeutic radiography, physiotherapy or paramedic science)
anatomy
biochemistry
biomedical science
chemistry
genetics
human biology
medical science
nursing
microbiology
pharmacy
physiology

an overview of a Physician Associates role:

Physician associates work within a defined scope of practice and limits of competence. They:

take medical histories from patients
carry out physical examinations
see patients with undifferentiated diagnoses
see patients with long-term chronic conditions
formulate differential diagnoses and management plans
perform diagnostic and therapeutic procedures
develop and deliver appropriate treatment and management plans
request and interpret diagnostic studies (except those involving ionising radiation)
provide health promotion and disease prevention advice for patients.

Physician associates are not able to:

prescribe (however regulation in 2021/2022 may allow them to)
request ionising radiation (eg chest x-ray or CT scan), again regulation may say otherwise…
provide care or treatments to patients in an unsupervised setting

physician associates are typically generalist practitioners, and have a similar role to a Nurse Practitioner, however they follow the medical model. in a way, they’re like a junior doctor. after a while, you’ll be encouraged to specialize in an area.
Physician associates can be found working in this way in primary and secondary care across 20 specialty areas throughout the uk.

areas include: psychiatry, pediatrics, dermatology, or surgery, acute medicine, obstetrics and gynaecology, trauma, emergency medicine etc. (these may differ in different countries.)
the most in demand: is general practice, acute (internal) medicine and emergency medicine

physician associate job info: https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-prof...cian-associate

nhs website overview: https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...cian-associate

fcarp overview:
https://www.fparcp.co.uk/about-fpa/w...ian-associates

FAQ’s:
https://www.fparcp.co.uk/about-fpa/faqs


you can partake in a 2 year postgraduate course in Physician Associate studies after graduation or an apprenticeship if you wish. again, it has amazing job prospects as is in high demand and good pay (newly qualified physician associates get £38,000 and this can exceed to £50,000+ with experience).

however, if you don’t want to pursue a medical career, don’t force it : )

if you have any other questions please ask
Last edited by pokoloco123; 1 month ago
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Scienceisgood
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Depending where you work and if you have a degree in Biomedical Science (not a requirement but desirable), Associate Practitioners can earn a decent living. Saw a position in London the other day paying 26-29k. 🙂
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Scienceisgood
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(Original post by one_two_three)
A degree in medicine and become a GP. Much more sociable hours and the potential for a very large salary.
GPs are expected to be on call 24/7 to medically advice their patients, so the sociable hours is a common misconception.

For example, my mother has epilepsy and a few years ago, she had a seizure. We phoned the emergency services because she’s hurt her head at the time during the seizure and and GP phones at 11:30pm at night to ask several questions. This was her first seizure in 10 years.
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Kecifer
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Private opticians? If all you care about is the money then medicine isn't for you, the salary is enough to have a decent living. You need to dedicate a lot of your time to patients, medicine is all about caring for your patient's health. A career in medicine shouldn't be seen as a way to make loads of money, there are better alternatives for that such as business and accounting.
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ecolier
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(Original post by Scienceisgood)
GPs are expected to be on call 24/7 to medically advice their patients, so the sociable hours is a common misconception.
That's definitely over and above their standard obligations, and will be covered by "locum" GPs usually, or your local GP who is receiving extra pay to cover that shift.

No GP has to work this if they don't want to.

Saying that they do have to cover the "core hours" of 8am - 6:30pm (GANFYD will correct me if the hours are wrong) Monday - Friday, and potentially Saturday mornings too. And of course, the intensity of work during these hours are quite high.

For example, my mother has epilepsy and a few years ago, she had a seizure. We phoned the emergency services because she’s hurt her head at the time during the seizure and and GP phones at 11:30pm at night to ask several questions. This was her first seizure in 10 years.
There will be an out of hours GP covering your area, but the GP you're registered with - may well not be the person who's covering.

Any GP who works out of hours is voluntary, no GP is "forced" to work nights or will have nights as part of their contract. Unlike many consultant anaesthetists or A&E doctors, for example.

GANFYD
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bkjknkjkbj
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(Original post by ecolier)
Please don't post in the Medicine forum is you literally don't want to do Medicine, I have moved your thread to the Healthcare forum which is much more appropriate.

Start by thinking about what you don't want to do... remember that money as a motivation is never a good thing for healthcare related careers.

If you are motivated economically, why not do something like investment banking etc.? I would also agree with the above that 5 years to become a junior doctor isn't particularly long.
I would strongly disagree with this as many doctors are in the profession due to the high salary later on in life which allows them to raise a family in security
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bkjknkjkbj
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(Original post by Kecifer)
Private opticians? If all you care about is the money then medicine isn't for you, the salary is enough to have a decent living. You need to dedicate a lot of your time to patients, medicine is all about caring for your patient's health. A career in medicine shouldn't be seen as a way to make loads of money, there are better alternatives for that such as business and account
Not sure why everyone got the idea that I am "motivated by the money" cause all I said was that I wanted a good salary from earlier which mentions nothing about doing healthcare solely due for the aim of gaining money. I just said that I am interested in the role of the doctor but feel that the cons outweight the pros and wanted to explore more options.
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becausethenight
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(Original post by bkjknkjkbj)
I would strongly disagree with this as many doctors are in the profession due to the high salary later on in life which allows them to raise a family in security
...really?
I mean, the salary isn’t bad, but I have yet to meet someone who chose medicine purely for that who wasn’t 16 and totally deluded about how much you get paid. Plus doctors are always complaining about antisocial hours for family life (and not being able to afford private school )
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