MedStudentt
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I've just completed 5th year of Med school and I feel the imposter syndrome has hit again.
Especially after not being able to get bloods and a nurse coming along and getting them easily

Did anyone feel this and when does it get better?
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girl_in_black
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Never lol
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Democracy
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For a while now I've felt that "imposter syndrome" is becoming one of those overused terms in medicine like "burnout" which end up losing their meaning when it seems like everyone has it (or at least, their own definition of it).

Which is not a criticism of you OP and certainly if imposter syndrome is something you're experiencing then I hope things improve for you.

If it's being disappointed because you missed getting some bloods...well, it's a practical skill and one which takes time to develop. I wouldn't expect a final year medical student to always get bloods on the first go (or sometimes at all - some patients are just difficult). Don't take it too hard, I'm sure you'll get it next time.
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MedStudentt
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(Original post by Democracy)
For a while now I've felt that "imposter syndrome" is becoming one of those overused terms in medicine like "burnout" which end up losing their meaning when it seems like everyone has it (or at least, their own definition of it).

Which is not a criticism of you OP and certainly if imposter syndrome is something you're experiencing then I hope things improve for you.

If it's being disappointed because you missed getting some bloods...well, it's a practical skill and one which takes time to develop. I wouldn't expect a final year medical student to always get bloods on the first go (or sometimes at all - some patients are just difficult). Don't take it too hard, I'm sure you'll get it next time.
Thank you. I don't think the patient was hard to be honest, I think it was just me. But, i guess it's normal to have good and bad days, thank you
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Helenia
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(Original post by MedStudentt)
Thank you. I don't think the patient was hard to be honest, I think it was just me. But, i guess it's normal to have good and bad days, thank you
Completely normal. I'm an anaesthetic registrar, i.e. the person who is meant to have ninja level cannulation skills, and I still occasionally miss easy ones. The most important thing is not to let that throw you off or get disheartened. It's one tiny practical skill as part of your armoury, and not a reflection of you as a whole. It's a bit annoying that it's one of the things patients judge you on (mine will never know how well I dealt with their difficult airway, or how I kept them alive through a major haemorrhage, but will remember if I give them a bruise from the cannula :rolleyes: ) but it doesn't make you a bad doctor.

As for the nurse getting it first time, maybe she is more experienced, or maybe it's just the benefit of a fresh pair of eyes. I'd say at least 50% of the "difficult cannula" calls I receive, I get first time with no problems, just because I'm new to the patient and not stressed at already having missed several times.
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InArduisFouette
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(Original post by MedStudentt)
I've just completed 5th year of Med school and I feel the imposter syndrome has hit again.
Especially after not being able to get bloods and a nurse coming along and getting them easily

Did anyone feel this and when does it get better?
the Nurse may have done thousands of cannulations and venepunctures ...

the key to failing as a junior Doctor is underestimating the RNs you work with
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Democracy
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(Original post by InArduisFouette)
the Nurse may have done thousands of cannulations and venepunctures ...
Only if they've gone on the course though right

the key to failing as a junior Doctor is underestimating the RNs you work with
I think it's a bit more complicated than that tbh.
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nexttime
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(Original post by MedStudentt)
I've just completed 5th year of Med school and I feel the imposter syndrome has hit again.
Especially after not being able to get bloods and a nurse coming along and getting them easily
I guess it depends on what you mean. My reaction to that scenario would be (and was) 'I've got 6 years of hugely expensive medical training why the **** am I doing cannulas?'

I'm not sure I would every say I personally had 'imposter syndrome'. I had at least AAA at A-level, I had a good BMAT. Based on those things alone, I wasn't unlike other people on that course. Some people give off a more confident impression than others and some people do better on the course than others, but in my mind i never thought i was an imposter because of that.

There were, however, a couple moments toward the end of med school when I was in med school that made me think 'ok maybe I can do this'. For example, one was someone toward the end of FY1 not being able to identify simple respiratory acidosis on a blood gas, so perhaps that should read 'ok, I can do this better than the people currently doing this'. Nothing to build confidence like others' failings!

(Original post by InArduisFouette)
the Nurse may have done thousands of cannulations and venepunctures ...
But still go to the first year junior doctor when they fail...
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InArduisFouette
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(Original post by nexttime)
<snip>


But still go to the first year junior doctor when they fail...
and your arrogance and ignorance betrays you once again
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Helenia
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(Original post by InArduisFouette)
and your arrogance and ignorance betrays you once again
Which part of what he said is not true?
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nexttime
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(Original post by InArduisFouette)
and your arrogance and ignorance betrays you once again
Ignorance how? You're saying experienced nurses don't go to very junior doctors when the can't do bloods?

Arrogant how? I literally opened the post by saying how stupid that situation is.
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MedStudentt
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(Original post by InArduisFouette)
the Nurse may have done thousands of cannulations and venepunctures ...

the key to failing as a junior Doctor is underestimating the RNs you work with
I wasn't underestimating nurses at all. I would have felt the same had a doctor come along and got it easily. The whole post was about me questioning my own level of competence.
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