making of aspirin

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alyxcts
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#1
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#1
I know that TLC is better than melting point in terms of purity but I don't know how it's tested can someone help me?
how is purity of TLC tested in industry?
how is the purity of melting point tested in industry?
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gogrizz123
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(Original post by alyxcts)
I know that TLC is better than melting point in terms of purity but I don't know how it's tested can someone help me?
how is purity of TLC tested in industry?
how is the purity of melting point tested in industry?
u know TLC stands for thin layer chromatography right? You cant test the purity of TCL lol
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alyxcts
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(Original post by gogrizz123)
u know TLC stands for thin layer chromatography right? You cant test the purity of TCL lol
???
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jack_harrison
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TLC:
You can use a reference spot of aspirin that is known to be pure, and run your product against it. If your product and the pure aspirin appear at the same Rf value with no extra or missing traces, you know that your product is pure.

Melting point:
More pure samples melt over a smaller temperature range. And assuming your melting point is in the expected range for the compound, generally a higher melting point indicates higher purity (for a confusing explanation of this, look up eutectics).
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alyxcts
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(Original post by jack_harrison)
TLC:
You can use a reference spot of aspirin that is known to be pure, and run your product against it. If your product and the pure aspirin appear at the same Rf value with no extra or missing traces, you know that your product is pure.

Melting point:
More pure samples melt over a smaller temperature range. And assuming your melting point is in the expected range for the compound, generally a higher melting point indicates higher purity (for a confusing explanation of this, look up eutectics).
does mixed melting point and melting point have the same principles?
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jack_harrison
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(Original post by alyxcts)
does mixed melting point and melting point have the same principles?
This is where the eutectics come in. In a mixture, the melting point will be below either of the pure substances'. This can be used as a check for whether you have a pure sample or a mixture. It's the same as the 'higher MP is more pure' thing that I mentioned in my first answer.
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