EmilieJE
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I need some help picking. I have an offer for Adult's nursing at University of Glasgow and may have an offer from King's College London for Children's nursing. What pros and cons are there to each course? Don't have to be uni specific just between children and adult. I don't want to make the wrong choice and would love to hear other's thoughts.
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Emily_B
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Adult nursing: do this if you want to look after adults. All your placements will be in adult care environments. You can convert to children's nursing later, or do SPHCN later and become a health visitor, or go straight into neonates, and can do conversion course to become a children's nurse.
Children's nursing: if you want to look after children, this is the best route. All your placements will be based in children's care settings. Switching to caring for adults isn't really possible.
There's so the issue of time and cost travelling home from either London or Glasgow to consider, as student nurses don't get as long holidays as other students.
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Tracey_W
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I think what Emily_B has said is best options to do like.
But adult nursing has a vast range of different area's you can go and specialised in.

Glasgow is a nice city and the university of glasgow is yes brilliant for nursing ok.
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millsr
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As unhelpful/obvious as this may sound, when picking between the two courses, it really does come down to one thing - do you want to work with children or adults? I know it's a hard thing to decide, especially when it feels like such an important career/life choice, so I'd advise as much research as possible to help you make an informed decision. You also have the advantage of having two different universities to choose between, which might end up being the deciding factor for you, so I'd also advise to thoroughly research them both.

If you really don't know and have no preference in regards to the university you go to, my best advice is to go with your gut instinct. That said, if you genuinely have no idea which one you'd rather do, a short pro/con list to potentially help you out:

Children's nursing pros:
- More effort made to keep your work environment fun/positive/less bleak
- Even the most difficult patients can be adorable sometimes (however con #2 and 3 may outweigh this)
- Slightly better prospects in terms of career progression as there are fewer children's nurses than adult (very minor difference though)

Children's nursing cons:
- Very emotionally demanding job, wards with lots of sick children can be very sad places to work
- Some absolute nightmare parents/family members
- Children generally require more energy to keep up with than adults, especially if they're young


Adult nursing pros:
- More variation/opportunities and areas to specialise
- Often easier to treat/communicate with as they understand what's going on and can regulate their emotions better than a child
- Opens more doors for the future (e.g. second registration, midwifery conversion, prison nursing, GP nursing etc. Some of these are possible as a children's nurse, but easier to get into as an adult nurse)

Adult nursing cons:
- Also very emotionally demanding a lot of the time, especially where death is involved
- Adults are often more complex patients with more emotional and mental needs to deal with
- Way more rude/bossy/demanding/hostile patients

In terms of the universities, I don't know them that well but obviously London is a very expensive place to live/study. Look at funding options for both - if you're Scottish, you'll probably be eligible for the NHS Scotland bursary (https://www.gov.scot/publications/su...fery-students/) if you go to Glasgow, but if you choose King's you can access the NHS Learning Support Fund (https://www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/nhs-learning-support-fund) as well as regular student finance. Hopefully that helps you a little, good luck with your decision!
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EmilieJE
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(Original post by millsr)
As unhelpful/obvious as this may sound, when picking between the two courses, it really does come down to one thing - do you want to work with children or adults? I know it's a hard thing to decide, especially when it feels like such an important career/life choice, so I'd advise as much research as possible to help you make an informed decision. You also have the advantage of having two different universities to choose between, which might end up being the deciding factor for you, so I'd also advise to thoroughly research them both.

If you really don't know and have no preference in regards to the university you go to, my best advice is to go with your gut instinct. That said, if you genuinely have no idea which one you'd rather do, a short pro/con list to potentially help you out:

Children's nursing pros:
- More effort made to keep your work environment fun/positive/less bleak
- Even the most difficult patients can be adorable sometimes (however con #2 and 3 may outweigh this)
- Slightly better prospects in terms of career progression as there are fewer children's nurses than adult (very minor difference though)

Children's nursing cons:
- Very emotionally demanding job, wards with lots of sick children can be very sad places to work
- Some absolute nightmare parents/family members
- Children generally require more energy to keep up with than adults, especially if they're young


Adult nursing pros:
- More variation/opportunities and areas to specialise
- Often easier to treat/communicate with as they understand what's going on and can regulate their emotions better than a child
- Opens more doors for the future (e.g. second registration, midwifery conversion, prison nursing, GP nursing etc. Some of these are possible as a children's nurse, but easier to get into as an adult nurse)

Adult nursing cons:
- Also very emotionally demanding a lot of the time, especially where death is involved
- Adults are often more complex patients with more emotional and mental needs to deal with
- Way more rude/bossy/demanding/hostile patients

In terms of the universities, I don't know them that well but obviously London is a very expensive place to live/study. Look at funding options for both - if you're Scottish, you'll probably be eligible for the NHS Scotland bursary (https://www.gov.scot/publications/su...fery-students/) if you go to Glasgow, but if you choose King's you can access the NHS Learning Support Fund (https://www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/nhs-learning-support-fund) as well as regular student finance. Hopefully that helps you a little, good luck with your decision!
Thank you so much! You've brought up plenty of points that give me some direction in next steps to make my decision process easier. I'm not a Scottish student (English but living in Wales), but I'll look into some more nurse-targeted financial aid.
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EmilieJE
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(Original post by Emily_B)
Adult nursing: do this if you want to look after adults. All your placements will be in adult care environments. You can convert to children's nursing later, or do SPHCN later and become a health visitor, or go straight into neonates, and can do conversion course to become a children's nurse.
Children's nursing: if you want to look after children, this is the best route. All your placements will be based in children's care settings. Switching to caring for adults isn't really possible.
There's so the issue of time and cost travelling home from either London or Glasgow to consider, as student nurses don't get as long holidays as other students.
That helps a lot actually. I was wondering which way around would be easier to convert to the other nursing type. In a perfect world, I would do both courses, but alas, I must choose. I'm going to look into conversion courses a lot more (I wasn't sure what to search for previously in regards to dual qualifications later on).
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