scarlettloke
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
Hi! I have received an offer from one of the UK medical schools (Glasgow), but am considering studying there for my first year, before reapplying to other UK medical schools such as Oxbridge, Imperial, UCL, etc. once the next application cycle opens in September this year. I don't mind redoing my first year all over again at a new school if I get in, but may I know if 1) the universities that I'm reapplying to would know that I'm currently studying at another UK medical school? and 2) if this would decrease my chances into getting into these UK medical schools as compared to being a fresh 2nd try applicant. Thank You!

p.s. I'm an international student as well if that's an important factor of consideration
Last edited by scarlettloke; 1 month ago
1
reply
Lovebear2951
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
(Original post by scarlettloke)
Hi! I have received an offer from one of the UK medical schools (Glasgow), but am considering studying there for my first year, before reapplying to other UK medical schools such as Oxbridge, Imperial, UCL, etc. once the next application cycle opens in September this year. I don't mind redoing my first year all over again at a new school if I get in, but may I know if 1) the universities that I'm reapplying to would know that I'm currently studying at another UK medical school? and 2) if this would decrease my chances into getting into these UK medical schools as compared to being a fresh 2nd try applicant. Thank You!

p.s. I'm an international student as well if that's an important factor of consideration
(Sorry, quickly pinging ecolier to ensure that I didn't miss anything, hope I'm not too much of a bother.)

Yes, universities generally do not accept transfers/applications current medical students except in exceptional circumstances, meaning you won't be even able to apply. The only transfer that I know of is from other medical schools to UCL's MB/PhD programme, which is quite competitive as I would imagine. Since you are still applying through UCAS, I would imagine that the universities will know that you are a current student.

I don't know why you would reapply or even consider repeating years for medicine. The university does not matter as much as if you were to say study finance. As long as it is an accredited university, then you will graduate and be able to find foundation year posts. Not only that, but Glasgow has produced doctors for many many years, and haven't had any large troubles with their medical school as I know of. Even if you were to move to say Singapore, where they only accept certain universities' qualifications, Glasgow is on the list of accepted qualifications. Which university doesn't matter when you apply for foundation year posts, as they are allocated through a system and given points based on how you rank within your medical school (and one could even technically argue that it would be harder to rank higher in Oxbridge), and at the end of the day, you will still be a doctor.

You also seem to sound as if you want to decline your offer in order to apply to other universities next cycle. Being an international applicant and receiving ANY offer for medical school is extremely difficult as there are very limited places. There is no guarantee that you will be accepted to ANY medical schools next year, as it could be even more competitive next year, or you could do worse on anything. If you are okay with the risk of potentially ending up with NO medical school at all, then yes, it's okay to do a second "try".

Also, if you were to do a second "try", you would have to do something productive during the gap year, as universities will be asking you what you've done during the gap year. This means you will have to arrange for work experience, prepare again for all the admissions tests, etc. Also, I would imagine that you've applied to universities that you are happy to attend! I'm quite confused as to why you wouldn't apply to universities that you wouldn't be happy to go to.

I understand that you might be disappointed that you have not gotten exactly the offer for the university that you have hoped for. However, it is a massive congratulations to get a place. Please do think and reflect upon these potential problems before doing anything, and do not act in haste. In addition, if you go to Glasgow with an open mind, who knows, you could really enjoy it there. They do PBL which is quite an interesting system and doesn't make you go to as many lectures.

Whatever you do, best of luck to you.
3
reply
scarlettloke
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#3
(Original post by Lovebear2951)
(Sorry, quickly pinging ecolier to ensure that I didn't miss anything, hope I'm not too much of a bother.)

Yes, universities generally do not accept transfers/applications current medical students except in exceptional circumstances, meaning you won't be even able to apply. The only transfer that I know of is from other medical schools to UCL's MB/PhD programme, which is quite competitive as I would imagine. Since you are still applying through UCAS, I would imagine that the universities will know that you are a current student.

I don't know why you would reapply or even consider repeating years for medicine. The university does not matter as much as if you were to say study finance. As long as it is an accredited university, then you will graduate and be able to find foundation year posts. Not only that, but Glasgow has produced doctors for many many years, and haven't had any large troubles with their medical school as I know of. Even if you were to move to say Singapore, where they only accept certain universities' qualifications, Glasgow is on the list of accepted qualifications. Which university doesn't matter when you apply for foundation year posts, as they are allocated through a system and given points based on how you rank within your medical school (and one could even technically argue that it would be harder to rank higher in Oxbridge), and at the end of the day, you will still be a doctor.

You also seem to sound as if you want to decline your offer in order to apply to other universities next cycle. Being an international applicant and receiving ANY offer for medical school is extremely difficult as there are very limited places. There is no guarantee that you will be accepted to ANY medical schools next year, as it could be even more competitive next year, or you could do worse on anything. If you are okay with the risk of potentially ending up with NO medical school at all, then yes, it's okay to do a second "try".

Also, if you were to do a second "try", you would have to do something productive during the gap year, as universities will be asking you what you've done during the gap year. This means you will have to arrange for work experience, prepare again for all the admissions tests, etc. Also, I would imagine that you've applied to universities that you are happy to attend! I'm quite confused as to why you wouldn't apply to universities that you wouldn't be happy to go to.

I understand that you might be disappointed that you have not gotten exactly the offer for the university that you have hoped for. However, it is a massive congratulations to get a place. Please do think and reflect upon these potential problems before doing anything, and do not act in haste. In addition, if you go to Glasgow with an open mind, who knows, you could really enjoy it there. They do PBL which is quite an interesting system and doesn't make you go to as many lectures.

Whatever you do, best of luck to you.
Hello! Thank you so much for your reply, I really appreciate it.

To reply to your question as to why I'm considering reapplying– I think the largest reason is that being an international student, my friends and family don't really know about Glasgow (even though I personally agree that it's an amazing school and am extremely excited to be enrolled there), and are only more familiar with names such as Oxbridge. I've worked extremely hard over my education years (completed research projects at the largest research institutions in my home country and have published a research paper, and set up a project that has raised 5 digits for a non-profit I believe in, etc.), and I think I've just been disheartened and felt a bit weary when I don't receive the support from my friends and family as I would wish for. I guess inadvertently, their opinions have affected the way I feel about my offer as well (even though I know it shouldn't), and it would be nice to have a little affirmation and to feel like my efforts have been recognized. Although, I guess this is more of an internal struggle and would be something I might come to terms with as I grow older.

I guess another factor as to why I was considering a reapplication is because growing up in a city since young, I would enjoy being in London more as compared to Scotland as it's more metropolitan. Medicine is a long course, and I feel that location might play an important part in my overall university experience. The last reason is that I was thinking of doing my training/ residency in the US, and was wondering if the university name might matter if I choose to do so and if it would affect my chances of getting a good residency position.

But you are right, practicing medicine is something that I've dreamt about since young, and would be hesitant to give up an offer on it. Personally, I'm also extremely excited and happy to be pursuing my studies in the UK (it's almost all I could ever ask for), and I know it's foolish to decline the offer, which is why I was wondering if other pathways are possible options for my specific situation.
Last edited by scarlettloke; 1 month ago
0
reply
Democracy
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 month ago
#4
(Original post by scarlettloke)
Hello! Thank you so much for your reply, I really appreciate it.

To reply to your question as to why I'm considering reapplying– I think the largest reason is that being an international student, my friends and family don't really know about Glasgow (even though I personally agree that it's an amazing school and am extremely excited to be enrolled there), and are only more familiar with names such as Oxbridge. I've worked extremely hard over my education years (completed research projects at the largest research institutions in my home country and have published a research paper, and set up a project that has raised 5 digits for a non-profit I believe in, etc.), and I think I've just been disheartened and felt a bit weary when I don't receive the support from my friends and family as I would wish for. I guess inadvertently, their opinions have affected the way I feel about my offer as well (even though I know it shouldn't), and it would be nice to feel like my efforts have been recognized.

I guess another factor as to why I was considering a reapplication is because growing up in a city since young, I would enjoy being in London more as compared to Scotland as it's more metropolitan. Medicine is a long course, and I feel that location might play an important part in my overall university experience. The last reason is that I was thinking of doing my training/ residency in the US, and was wondering if the university name might matter if I choose to do so and if it would affect my chances of getting a good residency position.

But you are right, practicing medicine is something that I've dreamt about since young, and would be hesitant to give up an offer on it. Personally, I'm also extremely excited and happy to be pursuing my studies in the UK (it's almost all I could ever ask for), and I know it's foolish to decline the offer, which is why I was wondering if other pathways are possible options for my specific situation.
Need to go to work but in short:

1) Transferring is very unlikely.
2) Glasgow is a very cool place to be and a great student city. There are lots of international students in Scotland, especially in Glasgow.
3) If you're absolutely determined to work in the US as an international student you're probably better off doing an undergrad degree there then trying to get into medicine ($$$$$). As a UK graduate (including Oxbridge/London), you will still need to jump through their myriad hoops.
1
reply
Turning_A_Corner
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 month ago
#5
It sounds like you want to have your cake and eat it too. You don’t want to let go of your offer but you want to reapply somewhere else because you like the look of the other universities better. The fact is, though, the only way you’re realistically going to be able to get an offer from the universities you prefer is by letting go of your current offer and reapplying. Most universities don’t accept transfers.
Another saying is relevant here. A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. You could let your current offer go and reapply and maybe get a choice. But maybe you wouldn’t.
You know the value of having your current offer in hand. You know this. I’ve been through something similar. I would love to be able to go to the university of York to study medicine. It’s closer to home, I wouldn’t have to move in a couple of years and I love the university. Applying there this year wasn’t an option though because it would take too much work for me. If I hadn’t got in anywhere this year I definitely would have applied there again next year. But I did get in somewhere. Manchester made me an offer and I’ve accepted. It will involve a few sacrifices, it’s true. But ultimately it’s the offer to study medicine that matters and I know that I’m going to get a fantastic education there. Those sacrifices aren’t worth me potentially losing an offer completely.
If you really feel confident that you can get another offer from your preferred universities, by all means apply again. But you wouldn’t be able to hide the fact that you were currently enrolled at another university from them as they’ll want to know what you’re currently doing. And they don’t accept transfers. I know how strict they are because a few years ago I was supporting a student with English as a second language who had fled Iran because she was protesting the government and she had left behind a medical degree. The places she applied to enforced that rule: you cannot be made an offer if you have left a place on another medical degree. I don’t know if she got in on appeal later. But that’s the harshest application of that rule I’ve seen.
I think you need to try and make your peace with your current offer. The majority of UK medical students apply tactically to medical schools these days and make applications to places where they think they stand the best chance of being accepted rather than the places they absolutely want to be. There were 5 universities that were geographically viable for me to apply to, but only three medical schools in the whole of the UK I could reasonably apply to this year given my academic and UCAT profile. I put two geographically viable ones down, one academically viable one down and another wild card. The latter two rejected me out of hand because one could probably tell from my personal statement that I didn’t really want to go there and the other I applied to just as a 4th option but I knew I would have only the slimmest chance of being offered an interview and it turned out to be a no-hoper. As I said, I’m happy with the university I got but it’s no secret that my life would be a whole lot easier if I could have applied to the universities that are literally on my doorstep. But sacrifice is part of the journey toward medicine.
You will find your way in Glasgow. You will probably be so busy you’ll forget where you even are most of the time. And your friends and family have it easy being able to grumble and grouse at you because it’s not their life. They’re not the ones who have to do the work, they’re not the ones who have to live with the consequences. Those same people would probably turn it around and say “how could you give up a place in medicine” if it all went belly up and you ended up with no offers. You don’t live your life for them, you live it for you.
It really does sound like you’re going to accomplish great things at Glasgow given your academic and work background. You’ll probably stand out there whereas you might find you struggle to do so at somewhere like Oxbridge or Imperial because all the graduate and overseas students are as ridiculously accomplished as you if not more so because they’re not generally “stocked” with normal applicants! I mean no disrespect to anyone there, it’s just that I know people who’ve attended both and I do question sometimes if these people are even familiar with the concept of sleep!
My advice is to take Glasgow and just try to bring your friends and family round with the information that people here have given you. You’ll do fine there, I really do believe that.
2
reply
lastlullabyy
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 month ago
#6
(Original post by scarlettloke)
Hi! I have received an offer from one of the UK medical schools (Glasgow), but am considering studying there for my first year, before reapplying to other UK medical schools such as Oxbridge, Imperial, UCL, etc. once the next application cycle opens in September this year. I don't mind redoing my first year all over again at a new school if I get in, but may I know if 1) the universities that I'm reapplying to would know that I'm currently studying at another UK medical school? and 2) if this would decrease my chances into getting into these UK medical schools as compared to being a fresh 2nd try applicant. Thank You!

p.s. I'm an international student as well if that's an important factor of consideration
I think other posters have already captured the essence but it'd be very unwise decision to do what you're thinking of doing.

I came to the UK (I'm not a UK national) in 2013 to start my undergrad degree at Lancaster. Afterwards I got a scholarship to Glasgow and did my MSc there. I fell in love with Scotland, Glasgow and the area - and now I got my dream med school offer so will be starting Medicine in 2022 (deferred application). However, I got an offer for Aberdeen earlier on and thought J might not get into Glasgow. I own a flat, have a husband, dogs and very settled life in Glasgow now. But if it wasn't meant to be, I'd still go to Aberdeen as it's a medical school and the goal is to become a doctor, not a graduate from a specific university.

I also assume that you applied to Oxford or Cambridge this application cycle and didn't get in? Because you can't apply to both anyway. You have absolutely NO GUARANTEE that you'd get in next year.

And they're not all that they're cracked up to be. My best friend (also not from the UK originally) dreamt of studying law at Oxford for years. She got an offer, was over the moon, smashed the IB exams - got in. Was meant to be dream come true... She absolutely hated it. The course, the uni... After 3 months she took time out, got back home, suffered from depression and had treatment. She withdrew from Oxford later on and did Business Studies at City University London. Enjoyed the course and the uni much more, and got into a competitve grad scheme in one of the Big 4. She had people from both Oxford and Cambridge in her cohort, but often performed better than them both at work and in exams. Now it doesn't matter as she's changing careers anyway but it just shows that really, no uni is "the dream" or Holy Grail.

Glasgow is a fantastic medical school. I did my MSc having a lot of classes in Learning & Teaching Centre adjacent to Queen Elizabeth University Hospital. Facilities are great, lecturers are great... The city is amazing. You also have Edinburgh only approx an hour away. Exploring more of Scotland is on your doorstep.

And doing residency in the US, from what I understand, is VERY difficult for non-US citizens. I have a friend who studied med not in the US and is currently doing peadiatric residency in Chicago BUT she has dual nationality and is a US citizen.
1
reply
scarlettloke
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#7
(Original post by Turning_A_Corner)
It sounds like you want to have your cake and eat it too. You don’t want to let go of your offer but you want to reapply somewhere else because you like the look of the other universities better. The fact is, though, the only way you’re realistically going to be able to get an offer from the universities you prefer is by letting go of your current offer and reapplying. Most universities don’t accept transfers.
Another saying is relevant here. A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. You could let your current offer go and reapply and maybe get a choice. But maybe you wouldn’t.
You know the value of having your current offer in hand. You know this. I’ve been through something similar. I would love to be able to go to the university of York to study medicine. It’s closer to home, I wouldn’t have to move in a couple of years and I love the university. Applying there this year wasn’t an option though because it would take too much work for me. If I hadn’t got in anywhere this year I definitely would have applied there again next year. But I did get in somewhere. Manchester made me an offer and I’ve accepted. It will involve a few sacrifices, it’s true. But ultimately it’s the offer to study medicine that matters and I know that I’m going to get a fantastic education there. Those sacrifices aren’t worth me potentially losing an offer completely.
If you really feel confident that you can get another offer from your preferred universities, by all means apply again. But you wouldn’t be able to hide the fact that you were currently enrolled at another university from them as they’ll want to know what you’re currently doing. And they don’t accept transfers. I know how strict they are because a few years ago I was supporting a student with English as a second language who had fled Iran because she was protesting the government and she had left behind a medical degree. The places she applied to enforced that rule: you cannot be made an offer if you have left a place on another medical degree. I don’t know if she got in on appeal later. But that’s the harshest application of that rule I’ve seen.
I think you need to try and make your peace with your current offer. The majority of UK medical students apply tactically to medical schools these days and make applications to places where they think they stand the best chance of being accepted rather than the places they absolutely want to be. There were 5 universities that were geographically viable for me to apply to, but only three medical schools in the whole of the UK I could reasonably apply to this year given my academic and UCAT profile. I put two geographically viable ones down, one academically viable one down and another wild card. The latter two rejected me out of hand because one could probably tell from my personal statement that I didn’t really want to go there and the other I applied to just as a 4th option but I knew I would have only the slimmest chance of being offered an interview and it turned out to be a no-hoper. As I said, I’m happy with the university I got but it’s no secret that my life would be a whole lot easier if I could have applied to the universities that are literally on my doorstep. But sacrifice is part of the journey toward medicine.
You will find your way in Glasgow. You will probably be so busy you’ll forget where you even are most of the time. And your friends and family have it easy being able to grumble and grouse at you because it’s not their life. They’re not the ones who have to do the work, they’re not the ones who have to live with the consequences. Those same people would probably turn it around and say “how could you give up a place in medicine” if it all went belly up and you ended up with no offers. You don’t live your life for them, you live it for you.
It really does sound like you’re going to accomplish great things at Glasgow given your academic and work background. You’ll probably stand out there whereas you might find you struggle to do so at somewhere like Oxbridge or Imperial because all the graduate and overseas students are as ridiculously accomplished as you if not more so because they’re not generally “stocked” with normal applicants! I mean no disrespect to anyone there, it’s just that I know people who’ve attended both and I do question sometimes if these people are even familiar with the concept of sleep!
My advice is to take Glasgow and just try to bring your friends and family round with the information that people here have given you. You’ll do fine there, I really do believe that.
Hey! Thank you so much for your thoughtful reply.

Regarding the universities wanting to know what I've been doing, I was not too worried about it because since the last application cycle this January, I have been involved in publishing a research paper, working with the national healthcare group in my country to publish COVID-19 related materials, involved in science communication-related materials to gain more exposure to asian scientists and scientific news, and am working in a clinic. I thought these experiences might be enough to explain my "gap year" (esp since I'm 19 and it is a COVID year), even if I do choose to enroll in university this year and cease these activities.

I also thought that it was interesting that you mentioned that all the graduates from Oxbridge and Imperial are ridiculously accomplished because that is one of my main motivations for thinking of transfer. During my past experiences, I really loved being part of an inspiring community and would hope to be part of that in my medical school years.

Additionally, you mentioned that you're currently studying medicine in UK. May I know your experience regarding that? Also, thank you so much for your kind words and advice, I really appreciate it
Last edited by scarlettloke; 1 month ago
0
reply
scarlettloke
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#8
(Original post by lastlullabyy)
I think other posters have already captured the essence but it'd be very unwise decision to do what you're thinking of doing.

I came to the UK (I'm not a UK national) in 2013 to start my undergrad degree at Lancaster. Afterwards I got a scholarship to Glasgow and did my MSc there. I fell in love with Scotland, Glasgow and the area - and now I got my dream med school offer so will be starting Medicine in 2022 (deferred application). However, I got an offer for Aberdeen earlier on and thought J might not get into Glasgow. I own a flat, have a husband, dogs and very settled life in Glasgow now. But if it wasn't meant to be, I'd still go to Aberdeen as it's a medical school and the goal is to become a doctor, not a graduate from a specific university.

I also assume that you applied to Oxford or Cambridge this application cycle and didn't get in? Because you can't apply to both anyway. You have absolutely NO GUARANTEE that you'd get in next year.

And they're not all that they're cracked up to be. My best friend (also not from the UK originally) dreamt of studying law at Oxford for years. She got an offer, was over the moon, smashed the IB exams - got in. Was meant to be dream come true... She absolutely hated it. The course, the uni... After 3 months she took time out, got back home, suffered from depression and had treatment. She withdrew from Oxford later on and did Business Studies at City University London. Enjoyed the course and the uni much more, and got into a competitve grad scheme in one of the Big 4. She had people from both Oxford and Cambridge in her cohort, but often performed better than them both at work and in exams. Now it doesn't matter as she's changing careers anyway but it just shows that really, no uni is "the dream" or Holy Grail.

Glasgow is a fantastic medical school. I did my MSc having a lot of classes in Learning & Teaching Centre adjacent to Queen Elizabeth University Hospital. Facilities are great, lecturers are great... The city is amazing. You also have Edinburgh only approx an hour away. Exploring more of Scotland is on your doorstep.

And doing residency in the US, from what I understand, is VERY difficult for non-US citizens. I have a friend who studied med not in the US and is currently doing peadiatric residency in Chicago BUT she has dual nationality and is a US citizen.
Hello!! Thank you so much for your reply.

Yup, you're right. I applied to Cambridge this year but was pooled and eventually rejected :/ That was quite crushing for me as well because the interviews were done on zoom and only lasted for 30 minutes, so I felt like I could have done so much more (especially since I was doing a lot to pursue my passion in this area, and my IB results and BMAT grades were high).

Also, I guess we have quite a bit in common! My best friend got into Oxford for law as well and she'll be enrolling this year. Hopefully, it'll work out well for her though But also, thanks for highlighting the reality of the situation – I guess a change of pace and scenery would be good for me as well.

Understanding you have studied in Glasgow and are living there though, may I trouble you to share with me more about your experience? What is nice to see there, possible areas of UK I can explore over the weekend, which Glasgow accommodations you'd recommend esp for medical students etc.? Or if you have any information on doing residency in the US as well. Thank you so much!
0
reply
lastlullabyy
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 month ago
#9
(Original post by scarlettloke)
Hello!! Thank you so much for your reply.

Yup, you're right. I applied to Cambridge this year but was pooled and eventually rejected :/ That was quite crushing for me as well because the interviews were done on zoom and only lasted for 30 minutes, so I felt like I could have done so much more (especially since I was doing a lot to pursue my passion in this area, and my IB results and BMAT grades were high).

Also, I guess we have quite a bit in common! My best friend got into Oxford for law as well and she'll be enrolling this year. Hopefully, it'll work out well for her though But also, thanks for highlighting the reality of the situation – I guess a change of pace and scenery would be good for me as well.

Understanding you have studied in Glasgow and are living there though, may I trouble you to share with me more about your experience? What is nice to see there, possible areas of UK I can explore over the weekend, which Glasgow accommodations you'd recommend esp for medical students etc.? Or if you have any information on doing residency in the US as well. Thank you so much!
I've been living in Glasgow since summer 2016, moved up here as soon as I wrapped up Lancaster graduation. Can't really comment on the student accommodation as I moved with my long-term partner and we rented a house in Paisley. I was working a lot in a care home in Inchinnan and commuted to classes at uni (did full-time MSc). After I finished uni, I got a job in Glasgow and stayed. Fell in love with Scotland and the city, and bought a flat in 2018.

I mean, you can see so much - depends what are your interests! I have a bucket list of Scottish castles, and membership for both Histotic Scotland and National Trust for Scotland. I've been to 31 castles so far, some of them more then once (or even twice!). Many more to see having two dogs we also spend weekends actively going on walks to different country parks etc. Glasgow has great connections to Edinburgh, takes less than an hour. You can also explore anywhere, really - I love Aberdeenshire (ehem might be also because of castles) and go there regularly. The Highlands are magnificient. Both me and my husband are also big whisky fans so love having so many great distilleries to visit There are so many great walks in and just outside Glasgow. Country parks are great, there's West Highland Way... Loch Lomond isn't far with Luss (the loveliest little village) and best ice cream on the way! You can venture anywhere, really. Next month we're going to Isle of Skye for 4 nights with the dogs.

Glasgow is actually the 5th biggest UK city - well... 4th really, if you don't count Leeds abd Bradford as one (not sure why anyone does 🙈). Scottish people are generally so welcoming and friendly, I moved here as a foreigner but have been feeling like it's my home for years now. I like to joke that Scotland is my adopted home country I'm actually planning to stay here pernamently, although might move to a different area of the country (depending!). My husband's originally from Manchester and loves living in Glasgow now. We visit Manchester regularly anyway (in pre-Covid times). But you get all the benefits of living in a "big" city without it becoming overhelming! My friend, one who dropped out of Oxford, will actually be moving from London to Glasgow with her partner - as they fell in love with it while visiting.

University experience is what you make it and want it to be.
Last edited by lastlullabyy; 1 month ago
0
reply
ecolier
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 month ago
#10
(Original post by scarlettloke)
Hey! Thank you so much for your thoughtful reply.

Regarding the universities wanting to know what I've been doing, I was not too worried about it because since the last application cycle this January, I have been involved in publishing a research paper, working with the national healthcare group in my country to publish COVID-19 related materials, involved in science communication-related materials to gain more exposure to asian scientists and scientific news, and am working in a clinic. I thought these experiences might be enough to explain my "gap year" (esp since I'm 19 and it is a COVID year), even if I do choose to enroll in university this year and cease these activities.

I also thought that it was interesting that you mentioned that all the graduates from Oxbridge and Imperial are ridiculously accomplished because that is one of my main motivations for thinking of transfer. During my past experiences, I really loved being part of an inspiring community and would hope to be part of that in my medical school years...
(1) You definitely cannot transfer - there's just no mechanism for Glasgow students to transfer into Oxbridge / UCL / Imperial

(2) As said, it would be very silly to give up on a medicine offer

(3) No matter what you said you did, there's still every chance you'd falter at the interview stages. Just because you are very accomplished on paper doesn't mean anything. If I am not mistaken, @qwert7890 is one of the best, highest scoring students in India - they were still rejected pre-interview(?) from Cambridge (statistically much, much less competitive for international students than Oxford).

Glasgow is an absolutely fine med school, if you read https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=6958240 you will see that Singapore Med Council has a strange (but who am I to criticise) policy to only recognise certain med schools in a country, but not others. Glasgow is one of the "prestigious" 16 med schools (out of about 40?) to be recognised.

Edit: oh and one more thing - I have always said don't worry about rankings for medicine but according to the Guardian rankings for 2021, Glasgow (12th out of 35) ranks higher than both Imperial (15th) and UCL (18th): https://www.theguardian.com/educatio...e-league-table

So enjoy your time at Glasgow, and don't stress too much about it!
Last edited by ecolier; 1 month ago
2
reply
Lovebear2951
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 month ago
#11
(Original post by scarlettloke)
Hello! Thank you so much for your reply, I really appreciate it.

To reply to your question as to why I'm considering reapplying– I think the largest reason is that being an international student, my friends and family don't really know about Glasgow (even though I personally agree that it's an amazing school and am extremely excited to be enrolled there), and are only more familiar with names such as Oxbridge. I've worked extremely hard over my education years (completed research projects at the largest research institutions in my home country and have published a research paper, and set up a project that has raised 5 digits for a non-profit I believe in, etc.), and I think I've just been disheartened and felt a bit weary when I don't receive the support from my friends and family as I would wish for. I guess inadvertently, their opinions have affected the way I feel about my offer as well (even though I know it shouldn't), and it would be nice to have a little affirmation and to feel like my efforts have been recognized. Although, I guess this is more of an internal struggle and would be something I might come to terms with as I grow older.

I guess another factor as to why I was considering a reapplication is because growing up in a city since young, I would enjoy being in London more as compared to Scotland as it's more metropolitan. Medicine is a long course, and I feel that location might play an important part in my overall university experience. The last reason is that I was thinking of doing my training/ residency in the US, and was wondering if the university name might matter if I choose to do so and if it would affect my chances of getting a good residency position.

But you are right, practicing medicine is something that I've dreamt about since young, and would be hesitant to give up an offer on it. Personally, I'm also extremely excited and happy to be pursuing my studies in the UK (it's almost all I could ever ask for), and I know it's foolish to decline the offer, which is why I was wondering if other pathways are possible options for my specific situation.
No worries, glad you found my reply helpful! Hope that it wasn't too harsh or rude!

And to answer your concerns, I know that definitely internationally, pretty much Oxbridge has the big name recognition. And it definitely sucks to feel that your friends and family don't support/celebrate as much as you have expected to! These feelings are normal, and it is natural to have that affect your feelings be affected by those around you.

However, on the bright side, Glasgow's also a city! It's not in the middle of nowhere, so you don't need to be overly worried. And also, if you are very much set on going to the US for residency, then matching IMG is definitely not the way to go. If you match IMG, and quoting some other people, unless you're set to do family medicine, internal medicine, pathology I think, then it is notoriously difficult to match.

Regarding the Oxbridge applications, they reject many qualified applicants because everyone who applies has at least like A*A*A or equivalents, and most people get quite high BMAT's are still rejected. Obviously, the people who are applying are probably self selecting as well. The 2021 Oxbridge A100 is filled with everyone with A*A*A grades as well as 13.0+ BMAT's and still get rejected, because at the end of the day they'll have to choose someone out of the 300-1000 or so applicants.

So don't be too harsh on yourself!
0
reply
Muttley79
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 month ago
#12
(Original post by scarlettloke)
Hello!! Thank you so much for your reply.

Yup, you're right. I applied to Cambridge this year but was pooled and eventually rejected :/ That was quite crushing for me as well because the interviews were done on zoom and only lasted for 30 minutes, so I felt like I could have done so much more (especially since I was doing a lot to pursue my passion in this area, and my IB results and BMAT grades were high).

Also, I guess we have quite a bit in common! My best friend got into Oxford for law as well and she'll be enrolling this year. Hopefully, it'll work out well for her though But also, thanks for highlighting the reality of the situation – I guess a change of pace and scenery would be good for me as well.

Understanding you have studied in Glasgow and are living there though, may I trouble you to share with me more about your experience? What is nice to see there, possible areas of UK I can explore over the weekend, which Glasgow accommodations you'd recommend esp for medical students etc.? Or if you have any information on doing residency in the US as well. Thank you so much!
You will have to declare you are at Glasgow when you reapply - reputation is irrelevant for Medicine

ecolier
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you think receiving Teacher Assessed Grades will impact your future?

I'm worried it will negatively impact me getting into university/college (132)
41.9%
I'm worried that I’m not academically prepared for the next stage in my educational journey (36)
11.43%
I'm worried it will impact my future career (27)
8.57%
I'm worried that my grades will be seen as ‘lesser’ because I didn’t take exams (67)
21.27%
I don’t think that receiving these grades will impact my future (34)
10.79%
I think that receiving these grades will affect me in another way (let us know in the discussion!) (19)
6.03%

Watched Threads

View All