Advice on how to transition into law

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lawques21
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I have a BA and MA degree in history of art, both with top marks. I've been working in the arts and antiques sector for a few years now, and am beginning to think I want to transition into law. What's the best approach? Doing some kind of PGDip Law Conversion degree in a not-so-great university, then doing my damnest to get into an LLM in as good a university as I can? Any advice appreciated.
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Manchester Metropolitan University
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(Original post by lawques21)
I have a BA and MA degree in history of art, both with top marks. I've been working in the arts and antiques sector for a few years now, and am beginning to think I want to transition into law. What's the best approach? Doing some kind of PGDip Law Conversion degree in a not-so-great university, then doing my damnest to get into an LLM in as good a university as I can? Any advice appreciated.
Hi lawques21

If you wish to train as a Lawyer, you will need to take a Graduate Diploma In Law ( A conversion course) as you mentioned.

The conventional pathway to qualifying as a solicitor in England and Wales is to study law at undergraduate level and then take a two year Legal Practice Course (LPC).

This postgraduate programme is a mandatory course that all law candidates have to pass in order to earn the right to practice as a solicitor. The Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) is a postgraduate course designed for individuals who did not study law at university but still want to pursue a career in the legal field.

However, please be aware that the route to qualification is changing, with the introduction of the Solicitors Qualifying Examination (SQE). The changes are being introduced by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA). The SQE will be a centralised assessment to ensure everyone is assessed in the same way. You can find more information here: https://www.solicitor-exams.co.uk/

Following on from this, you could then go on to complete either LLM, LLM Legal Practice at the Bar or LLM Legal Practice Course dependant on your future career goals.

I hope this helps a little! We do offer the GDL and LLM courses here at Manchester Met if you are interested you can find more information here: https://www.mmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/subject/law/


Good luck with everything!
Carly
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17Student17
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The bigger and better law firms recruit "trainee solicitors" several years in advance and then pay for your SQE1 course and exam year and your SQE2 course and exams before you then do (if you passed all the exams) a 2 year paid contract with them where you work for the one firm. Other firms will follow a different pattern under the new SQE system. At the bottom of the page on this link is the City law firm route some firms are adopting https://www.slaughterandmay.com/medi...ay-2020_v4.pdf

For those jobs you would need a minimum of AAB in good A levels and have been to a good university and got a 2/1 or higher. They want your marks in all modules in each year of your degree too. Most people who apply don't get in and the system is you apply a few years in advance and often apply for the very competitive paid vacation scheme places first too so they have a chance to assess you for a week.
In your case you may want to look at a commercial loan to pay for SQE1 and 2 exams - total cost about £4k (exam fees only) but you are very likely to need to do a course to pass the exams ( so a bigger loan) although it is not compulsory. As you are currently working you might want to do the courses part time.

It might be a good idea to try to get some informal work experience perhaps even in a firm that does art law. Some of the firms which do art law are here https://www.legal500.com/c/london/pr...ural-property/
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