hrtpjm
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i'm predicted to get a*a*a at a-level and i've received offers from some rlly great unis but i don't feel ready for it ?? i just wanna go to my insurance choice since it's local so i can live at home and commute but it's nowhere near as prestigious as some of the places i could go ?? does it rlly matter that much ??
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Fares Abdellatif
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Depend on your field and dream career. If your dream job isn’t picky in entry level, and you’ll be able to land an internship or job offer without a big uni on your resume, then definitely go for your insurance.
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Megxn0
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I have the same problem!
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artful_lounger
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Maybe, maybe not. Depends what you want to do. Terence Tao, world renowned mathematician, went to a uni local to him that wasn't especially well known for it's maths department, just because it was better for his situation (of already doing almost graduate level maths, but still being very young, and also often travelling to conferences etc). He still continued doing groundbreaking maths work and later became a faculty member at a pretty strong maths department (UCLA), so obviously that didn't hold him back. However, if you wanted to e.g. go into investment banking, then it may well make a big difference which uni you go to.

Personally I originally started studying at a uni local to me, initially commuting (which was a real pain after a while), then living in a shared house, but because it was so close to home, I ended up going home almost every weekend. In the end that didn't really help me develop personally and I ended up more isolated than I would've been studying further away. In the end I swapped to a uni that was further away, which necessarily forced me to start getting to know other people and being more responsible for my own living arrangements, which is helpful to develop long-term.

So you may want to consider instead taking a gap year, and looking at trying to develop more independence by e.g. working for a year, so you can feel more confident going to uni. Also going to uni is a big step and can be quite a lot to take in at first, but remember that most of the other students there are in the same boat, so you're not alone in that situation!
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hrtpjm
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(Original post by Fares Abdellatif)
Depend on your field and dream career. If your dream job isn’t picky in entry level, and you’ll be able to land an internship or job offer without a big uni on your resume, then definitely go for your insurance.
i'm doing a psychology degree and i think i want to be a psychotherapist or a social worker,, sth in that field (?)
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by hrtpjm)
i'm predicted to get a*a*a at a-level and i've received offers from some rlly great unis but i don't feel ready for it ?? i just wanna go to my insurance choice since it's local so i can live at home and commute but it's nowhere near as prestigious as some of the places i could go ?? does it rlly matter that much ??
(Original post by Megxn0)
I have the same problem!
It might not do, but it might do, and your degree is with you for the rest of your life. No-one is going to be bothered with a story that you could have got into a better university. You are paying the same amount of money wherever you go and you have to leave home at some point - or are you always going to live at home? University is designed for people leaving home for the first time. If you aren't ready to leave home, a gap year will probably fix that soon enough, but you've only got one shot at an undergrad degree, don't waste it.
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Fares Abdellatif
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(Original post by hrtpjm)
i'm doing a psychology degree and i think i want to be a psychotherapist or a social worker,, sth in that field (?)
I have no idea about this field to be honest. (Could’ve helped if its econ or finance). Anyways my advice would be to consider two things: all the options you could possibly take, and your priorities. For example, some people prioritize saving money for their parents as they’re paying for their tuition, while want a high ranked uni. In this case, you should speak with you’re parents and accept the highest ranked uni they could afford(which i did in my case). If money isn’t a problem, I recommend that you start getting out of your comfort zone and explore the firm option you chose. At some point in time you’ll leave your house and family, wether you’re ready for it or not, and uni is a great way to do so as there are a lot of things put into order for you to adapt and maturing. All those events, clubs, societies and trips to bring student together, I don’t think you’ll find anything like this to help you adapts if you leave home after uni. Try offer holder events of your firm uni, and should you feel that it isn’t appealing after exploring it, you can always do adjustment, provided you have the grades to do so. Best of luck.
(Original post by hrtpjm)
i'm doing a psychology degree and i think i want to be a psychotherapist or a social worker,, sth in that field (?)
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Proxenus
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I wouldn't go to uni if I had to commute. uni experience would be so rubbish. can't make life long flat mate freinds, hard to join societies and night out.
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Admit-One
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It’s most often better to be at a uni you would be happy at, rather than chasing a ranking and being miserable.

I stayed at home and commuted. I made friends, joined societies and socialised just the same as those that had moved hundreds of miles away. Those kind of things are down to you and how much you want to engage with them. As above, if you are strongly introverted then staying at home might give you an ‘out’ and wouldn’t force you to step outside your comfort zone, but at the same time some people would find that very stressful and unwelcome. It’s a personal choice.
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CardiganOfAngst
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(Original post by hrtpjm)
i'm doing a psychology degree and i think i want to be a psychotherapist or a social worker,, sth in that field (?)
My partner’s sister stayed at home and went to a local university to do her psychology and masters degree. She has recently started a job that is in a field she likes will help her gain experience get the job she wants.

She had both local and uni friends and enjoyed being able to ‘distress’ and work in an environment she was comfortable with and this helped her mental health.
She went on an international year, which could be a good option (if possible considering COVID) for you to experience living away from home if you stayed local.

( unfortunately for her it went badly and she came back early but hey..)

Admittedly, she lives at home and hasn’t had the experience and maturity that comes from living on your own/with friends, but she did what was best for her.

My sister was the opposite. Went to a local prestigious university. Didn’t like the course and being close to home and reapplied and went to study at a less ranked university but benefited from a course she liked and finding herself and gaining independence.

Ultimately, you need to decide what’s best for you.
Last edited by CardiganOfAngst; 4 weeks ago
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hrtpjm
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(Original post by CardiganOfAngst)
My partner’s sister stayed at home and went to a local university to do her psychology and masters degree. She has recently started a job that is in a field she likes will help her gain experience get the job she wants.

She had both local and uni friends and enjoyed being able to ‘distress’ and work in an environment she was comfortable with and this helped her mental health.
She went on an international year, which could be a good option (if possible considering COVID) for you to experience living away from home if you stayed local.

( unfortunately for her it went badly and she came back early but hey..)

Admittedly, she lives at home and hasn’t had the experience and maturity that comes from living on your own/with friends, but she did what was best for her.

My sister was the opposite. Went to a local prestigious university. Didn’t like the course and being close to home and reapplied and went to study at a less ranked university but benefited from a course she liked and finding herself and gaining independence.

Ultimately, you need to decide what’s best for you.
i'm planning on studying in abroad korea for my second year since i already have some friends there and i know it'd help me with independence and confidence (: if you don't mind me asking how did it go badly for her ?? i'm trying to do as much research on it as possible
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CardiganOfAngst
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(Original post by hrtpjm)
i'm planning on studying in abroad korea for my second year since i already have some friends there and i know it'd help me with independence and confidence (: if you don't mind me asking how did it go badly for her ?? i'm trying to do as much research on it as possible
She went with a group of people she got with on her course. Turns out one of them was a vicious bully, and being stuck in an apartment with her, thousands of miles away in a country she didn’t really speak the language really made her miserable. She flew back home after a couple months.

You have friends in the country you want stay already so I think you should be fine.
Last edited by CardiganOfAngst; 4 weeks ago
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hrtpjm
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(Original post by CardiganOfAngst)
She went with a group of people she got with on her course. Turns out one of them was a vicious bully, and being stuck in an apartment with her, thousands of miles away in a country she didn’t really speak the language really made her miserable. She flew back home after a couple months.

You have friends in the country you want stay already so I think you should be fine.
that sounds awful omg cannot imagine what that must've been like,, hope she's doing okay now <333
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harrysbar
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(Original post by hrtpjm)
i'm doing a psychology degree and i think i want to be a psychotherapist or a social worker,, sth in that field (?)
I can’t see it mattering for Psychology/ Social work so do what feels right for you. Unless your local uni happens to be exceptionally poor in which case I would avoid it. Unis that are mid range in league tables are fine in my opinion but you don’t want to end up somewhere that there will be no one else of your academic calibre
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