Is it ok to miss some lectures due to work

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heyheypeople
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I'm currently in the final phases of being accepted at a new job as a software developer, which is one of my fields of study(Computer Science). It's 30 hours and it provides a stable income. The only problem is that they asked about my flexibility with the lectures. My attendance is always recorded, so I-m afraid that I will get in trouble if I need to miss a lecture occasionally.So my question is: Is missing occasionally lectures due to work a justifiable excuse? If it's not, how likely I will get prosecuted if I miss some lectures. The university has attendance policies but they do not specify job-related issues.Thank you and stay safe.
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GabiAbi84
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What is their attendance policy?
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heyheypeople
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(Original post by GabiAbi84)
What is their attendance policy?
In the "Authorised Absence" section, it states:
4.1 - The University recognises that, occasionally, students may be unable to meet the minimum attendance or engagement requirements due to unforeseen circumstances.

4.2 If a student is unable to attend face-to-face teaching or engage with the VLE as detailed in section 5, they must notify the University; if this is not done, the absence will count as a missed point of contact.


4.3 For absences of more than a calendar week, students must complete anauthorised absence form. This form must be authorised by their Programme Leader or supervisor and lodged with the faculty Retention and Success Officer and, where relevant, the Research & Enterprise Training Institute.


4.4 Where possible, a request for authorised absence should be submitted in advance. Authorisation for unplanned absences may be submitted up to 5 working days after the last day of absence. Requests for authorised absence submitted after 5 working days may not be considered.


4.5 Authorised absence forms must be supported by appropriate evidence. 4.6 The university will consider requests for authorised absence supported by evidence that demonstrates why the absence should be permitted. All requests will be treated sensitively and the university will try to accommodate all reasonable requests. However, where an absence may have a detrimental effect on a student’s academic progress, or where absence levels are already of concern, such requests may not be granted


I think Section 4 describes the best: https://docs.gre.ac.uk/__data/assets...2020-FINAL.pdf
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jonathanemptage
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(Original post by heyheypeople)
I'm currently in the final phases of being accepted at a new job as a software developer, which is one of my fields of study(Computer Science). It's 30 hours and it provides a stable income. The only problem is that they asked about my flexibility with the lectures. My attendance is always recorded, so I-m afraid that I will get in trouble if I need to miss a lecture occasionally.So my question is: Is missing occasionally lectures due to work a justifiable excuse? If it's not, how likely I will get prosecuted if I miss some lectures. The university has attendance policies but they do not specify job-related issues.Thank you and stay safe.
Probably best to see if you can work around the lectures if not I would consider wether you wan that job I know it's a good job foot in the door and all that but they will see you as a doormat, and further down the road you could get passed up for promotions which wouldn't be a good thing. You'll have to stand up to them politely explaining that your lectures come first and that you want to be able to do as well as you can. If they don't respect that and try to get you to miss lectures walk away. The degree always comes first.
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Rosie2418
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I agree, your degree comes first as it will give you more options and opportunities. Communication is also key here, speak to both parties and see what you can come up with as a plan.
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GabiAbi84
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I mean, missing A lecture here or there won’t get you kicked out but having to work is not an acceptable excuse for an authorised absence- you shouldn’t be working when you have scheduled lectures.
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martin7
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(Original post by heyheypeople)
I'm currently in the final phases of being accepted at a new job as a software developer, which is one of my fields of study(Computer Science). It's 30 hours and it provides a stable income. The only problem is that they asked about my flexibility with the lectures. My attendance is always recorded, so I-m afraid that I will get in trouble if I need to miss a lecture occasionally.So my question is: Is missing occasionally lectures due to work a justifiable excuse? If it's not, how likely I will get prosecuted if I miss some lectures. The university has attendance policies but they do not specify job-related issues.Thank you and stay safe.
If you're working 30 hours a week , then you need to ask yourself whether that allows you enough free time to do a full-time degree.

I was always told that you should consider a full-time degree as being a full-time job. So you should be looking to commit around 35 hours a week to studying, including formal academic commitments (lectures, seminars, workshops, etc) and coursework, reading, other preparation etc.

Universities accept that many students will work part-time to help fund their studies, but they'd recommend no more than 15 hours per week, and expect that to be scheduled so as not to impact on students' attendance at their academic commitments. No university would advise working 30 hours a week on top of a full-time course; it's inevitably going to have an impact on your studies.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by jonathanemptage)
Probably best to see if you can work around the lectures if not I would consider wether you wan that job I know it's a good job foot in the door and all that but they will see you as a doormat, and further down the road you could get passed up for promotions which wouldn't be a good thing. You'll have to stand up to them politely explaining that your lectures come first and that you want to be able to do as well as you can. If they don't respect that and try to get you to miss lectures walk away. The degree always comes first.
I see. Thank you for insight. If the company is not flexible, I will refuse the job then.
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heyheypeople
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(Original post by martin7)
If you're working 30 hours a week , then you need to ask yourself whether that allows you enough free time to do a full-time degree.

I was always told that you should consider a full-time degree as being a full-time job. So you should be looking to commit around 35 hours a week to studying, including formal academic commitments (lectures, seminars, workshops, etc) and coursework, reading, other preparation etc.

Universities accept that many students will work part-time to help fund their studies, but they'd recommend no more than 15 hours per week, and expect that to be scheduled so as not to impact on students' attendance at their academic commitments. No university would advise working 30 hours a week on top of a full-time course; it's inevitably going to have an impact on your studies.
Thanks for sharing your opinion. I will refuse then.
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heyheypeople
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(Original post by jonathanemptage)
Probably best to see if you can work around the lectures if not I would consider wether you wan that job I know it's a good job foot in the door and all that but they will see you as a doormat, and further down the road you could get passed up for promotions which wouldn't be a good thing. You'll have to stand up to them politely explaining that your lectures come first and that you want to be able to do as well as you can. If they don't respect that and try to get you to miss lectures walk away. The degree always comes first.
Much appreciated for your words. If they cannot be flexible, I will reject it.
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Chronoscope
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Depends what your priorities are and if you think you’re keeping up with the work. You could evaluate how efficient your studying methods are currently if you intend to do both (e.g. work smarter etc)
Last edited by Chronoscope; 4 weeks ago
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