Saigeii
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#1
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#1
does anyone know what the year 11s will be tested on for English language paper 2, they probably wont be using the 2020 papers? I really need question 4 and the both sources before Wednesday
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hehe69
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#2
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i have no idea sorry... i have mine tomorrow tho
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hehe69
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#3
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(Original post by Saigeii)
does anyone know what the year 11s will be tested on for English language paper 2, they probably wont be using the 2020 papers? I really need question 4 and the both sources before Wednesday
idk if they made mine up.. but mine was on tourism... the sources were a 2018 guardian news paper article on tourism and the negatives of it on cornwall, and the other source was a diary entry by someone Kilvert, from april in the 1800s when he visits the long stone or something... idk if that helps ahaha sorry
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hehe69
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#4
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#4
(Original post by Saigeii)
does anyone know what the year 11s will be tested on for English language paper 2, they probably wont be using the 2020 papers? I really need question 4 and the both sources before Wednesday
hey i did mine today and idk if my school made theirs up but this was mine:

SOURCE A:

Last week Cornwall became the latest beauty spot on the planet to admit it was the victim of its own success in attracting tourists. Such is the swell in numbers that there’s barely enough space to place a beach towel on the sands of Porthcurno beach and Kynance Cove. The local tourist board, tasked with getting people to come to the coast, has resorted to pleading with people to stay away. No doubt the long, hot summer sent people scuttling for the coast. But Cornwall’s overtourism problem highlights a number of familiar trends. First is how society now views nature itself as merely one more good to be consumed; second, the shallow, modern need to present a life free from the tyranny of a nine-to-five office job in the tight frame of Instagram; last, the influx of “set-jetters”, who seek out the locations of their favourite television dramas or films.

In the case of Cornwall, the fans of the BBC’s Poldark arrived in such numbers that it threatened what attracted them in the first place: the tranquil sublimity of the Cornish Caribbean. Others have taken more drastic steps to curb fans’ insatiable appetite to visit places depicted on screen. Croatia’s Dubrovnik, used as the fictional King’s Landing on TV’s Game of Thrones, has limited the daily numbers that can enter the historic old town. Thailand’s Maya Bay, location for the film The Beach, was shut to tourists who came in such large numbers that they spoiled the place they were meant to enjoy.

Cities across Europe now regularly see locals take to the streets to protest about everything from noise and litter to Airbnb out-of-towners warping house prices. Deregulation of taxi laws have seen a spike in ride-hailing services like Uber clog streets. This is unsustainable: the desire for the authentic is coming at the expense of the locals who are supposed to provide it. Barcelona’s mayor responded by making it harder for visitors to stay. Others say tourist profits ought to be offset by a bill for damage caused. The answer to such questions rest with whether there is an ecologically and socially viable model of seeing the world. They also lie with governments, in the rich and poor world, taking a more sober view of tourism’s economic potential. Perhaps most important is for travellers to understand how their behaviour can exhaust the allure of a destination faster than it can be replenished – and alter their conduct permanently.


SOURCE B: (i cant find the first para to this one sorry)

Thursday, 7 April- I had the satisfaction of managing to walk from Hay to Clyro by the fields without meeting a single person, always a great triumph to me and a subject for warm self congratulation for I have a peculiar dislike to meeting people, and a peculiar liking for a deserted road. When I looked out between 11 and 12 before going to bed I saw one of the magnificent sights of the world, the crescent moon setting.

Wednesday, 27 July- The horses were put up at the inn and we walked by a narrow pass cut in the cliffs and over steep slippery rock slopes and ledges to the Logan Stone. At the foot of the steep rock on which the Logan Stone is balanced aman stood ready to show the way up, and when he saw me coming he began to run up just like a monkey. His action was so sudden, strange and wild, and so exactly that of a monkey clambering up the bars of his cage, that I looked to see whether he had a tail. He helped me up capitally with knee and hand. I could never have got up by myself for the rock faces were very steep, smooth and slippery. The guide wanted to put me up on to the top of the Logan Stone but I declined. He shewed me the deft in the cliff into which the Logan Stone rolled when Lieutenant Goldsmith and his crew upset it. The guide first put his shoulder under the stone and rocked it, and then I did the same. It rods perceptibly though very slightly. But it has never rocked so well and easily since it was wilfully thrown down. The perfect balance of nature could never be restored. I found the rest of the party waiting for me sitting on the opposite rock. An elderly grizzled man in a blue slop was offering photographs for sale. He was a boy when the Logan Stone was upset 46 years ago, and he remembered its being replaced. As we returned to the wild granite village along the field paths a rude vulgar crew of tourists (real British) passed us going down to the cliffs, grinning like dogs, and one of the male beasts said in a loud insolent voice evidently meant for us to hear, ‘I hope they haven’t upset the Logan Rock’. For a moment I devoutly wished that we had.

Glossary- descried – saw staves –a wooden stick discoursing– talking noxious– very unpleasant capitally –in an excellent way shewed –showed deft –steep rock face devoutly –sincerely

(The second entry focuses on Kilvert’s visit to Cornwall and primarily the Logan Stone, a popular tourist attraction. The Logan Rock, near Treen, is an example of a rocking stone, weighing 80 tonnes. In 1824 it was toppled by a group of men in the Navy (‘Lieutenant Goldsmith and his crew’). Since it had become a local tourist attraction, localresidents complained, so the men were ordered to put it back again. The Logan Rock still rocks today,but less easily than before.)

QUESTIONS: (cant remember them exactly)

Q2- summarise differences between (i cant remember sorry)
Q3- In source B how does the writer use language to describe his visit to the Logan Stone and the people he met.
Q4- how do the writers present their different ideas and viewpoints of tourism and tourists
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deadfly
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#5
Report 8 months ago
#5
(Original post by hehe69)
hey i did mine today and idk if my school made theirs up but this was mine:

SOURCE A:

Last week Cornwall became the latest beauty spot on the planet to admit it was the victim of its own success in attracting tourists. Such is the swell in numbers that there’s barely enough space to place a beach towel on the sands of Porthcurno beach and Kynance Cove. The local tourist board, tasked with getting people to come to the coast, has resorted to pleading with people to stay away. No doubt the long, hot summer sent people scuttling for the coast. But Cornwall’s overtourism problem highlights a number of familiar trends. First is how society now views nature itself as merely one more good to be consumed; second, the shallow, modern need to present a life free from the tyranny of a nine-to-five office job in the tight frame of Instagram; last, the influx of “set-jetters”, who seek out the locations of their favourite television dramas or films.

In the case of Cornwall, the fans of the BBC’s Poldark arrived in such numbers that it threatened what attracted them in the first place: the tranquil sublimity of the Cornish Caribbean. Others have taken more drastic steps to curb fans’ insatiable appetite to visit places depicted on screen. Croatia’s Dubrovnik, used as the fictional King’s Landing on TV’s Game of Thrones, has limited the daily numbers that can enter the historic old town. Thailand’s Maya Bay, location for the film The Beach, was shut to tourists who came in such large numbers that they spoiled the place they were meant to enjoy.

Cities across Europe now regularly see locals take to the streets to protest about everything from noise and litter to Airbnb out-of-towners warping house prices. Deregulation of taxi laws have seen a spike in ride-hailing services like Uber clog streets. This is unsustainable: the desire for the authentic is coming at the expense of the locals who are supposed to provide it. Barcelona’s mayor responded by making it harder for visitors to stay. Others say tourist profits ought to be offset by a bill for damage caused. The answer to such questions rest with whether there is an ecologically and socially viable model of seeing the world. They also lie with governments, in the rich and poor world, taking a more sober view of tourism’s economic potential. Perhaps most important is for travellers to understand how their behaviour can exhaust the allure of a destination faster than it can be replenished – and alter their conduct permanently.


SOURCE B: (i cant find the first para to this one sorry)

Thursday, 7 April- I had the satisfaction of managing to walk from Hay to Clyro by the fields without meeting a single person, always a great triumph to me and a subject for warm self congratulation for I have a peculiar dislike to meeting people, and a peculiar liking for a deserted road. When I looked out between 11 and 12 before going to bed I saw one of the magnificent sights of the world, the crescent moon setting.

Wednesday, 27 July- The horses were put up at the inn and we walked by a narrow pass cut in the cliffs and over steep slippery rock slopes and ledges to the Logan Stone. At the foot of the steep rock on which the Logan Stone is balanced aman stood ready to show the way up, and when he saw me coming he began to run up just like a monkey. His action was so sudden, strange and wild, and so exactly that of a monkey clambering up the bars of his cage, that I looked to see whether he had a tail. He helped me up capitally with knee and hand. I could never have got up by myself for the rock faces were very steep, smooth and slippery. The guide wanted to put me up on to the top of the Logan Stone but I declined. He shewed me the deft in the cliff into which the Logan Stone rolled when Lieutenant Goldsmith and his crew upset it. The guide first put his shoulder under the stone and rocked it, and then I did the same. It rods perceptibly though very slightly. But it has never rocked so well and easily since it was wilfully thrown down. The perfect balance of nature could never be restored. I found the rest of the party waiting for me sitting on the opposite rock. An elderly grizzled man in a blue slop was offering photographs for sale. He was a boy when the Logan Stone was upset 46 years ago, and he remembered its being replaced. As we returned to the wild granite village along the field paths a rude vulgar crew of tourists (real British) passed us going down to the cliffs, grinning like dogs, and one of the male beasts said in a loud insolent voice evidently meant for us to hear, ‘I hope they haven’t upset the Logan Rock’. For a moment I devoutly wished that we had.

Glossary- descried – saw staves –a wooden stick discoursing– talking noxious– very unpleasant capitally –in an excellent way shewed –showed deft –steep rock face devoutly –sincerely

(The second entry focuses on Kilvert’s visit to Cornwall and primarily the Logan Stone, a popular tourist attraction. The Logan Rock, near Treen, is an example of a rocking stone, weighing 80 tonnes. In 1824 it was toppled by a group of men in the Navy (‘Lieutenant Goldsmith and his crew’). Since it had become a local tourist attraction, localresidents complained, so the men were ordered to put it back again. The Logan Rock still rocks today,but less easily than before.)

QUESTIONS: (cant remember them exactly)

Q2- summarise differences between (i cant remember sorry)
Q3- In source B how does the writer use language to describe his visit to the Logan Stone and the people he met.
Q4- how do the writers present their different ideas and viewpoints of tourism and tourists
was your language paper 1 the Mr Fisher text?
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hehe69
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#6
Report 8 months ago
#6
(Original post by deadfly)
was your language paper 1 the Mr Fisher text?
i didnt do lang paper 1 sorry... my creative writing (Q5 paper 1) was a story w title abandoned and a boy behind a fence... but again idk if they just made that up or...
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