maisies0133
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i have an RS exam and i'm practicing questions from the assessment resources released by the exam boards, one of them is a 12 marker which says

"seeing the four sights was the most important part of the buddhas life" - evaluate this statement.

Im really struggling !!!!! pls help
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AI073
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Hi,

I answered a question about RS and gave some general tips. You should take a look at those (see below).

This is from the original poster:

“I'm revising paper 1 Islam, and i did a 12 marker as practise.
I need someone to mark it, any response is greatly appreicated (even feedback on 1 paragraph). What mark would you give me?
I also have a few question:
For a 12 marker, do you do 4 PEEL paragraphs or 6 (with a conclusion)?
Do you need a introduction/
How many quotes should you include?
How long should it be (with normal handwiring on A4)?
Most importantly in this question what parts should I remove/expand

This is the question and answer:

‘The Qur’an is the only authority a Muslim need in life.’

Evaluate this statement. In your answer you should:

• refer to Muslim teaching

• give reasoned arguments to support this statement

• give reasoned arguments to support a different point of view

• reach a justified conclusion.

[12marks] [SPAG 3 marks]



The Qur’an is a source of guidance and authority sent to this world through the last prophet, it was revealed to the prophet Muhammad PBUH by an angel over the course of 23 years (this number is disputed.) As it was revealed to the prophet, he would reveal it to the public shortly after. The Quran contains information for Muslims on how to live their life, it contains information on situations that involve everything from marriage to crimes and financial situations. These guide Muslims towards doing everything in a permissible way.

Some Muslims agree that the Qur’an is the only source of authority they need in life. This is because it is an infallible source, meaning it is completely correct without error. They believe it is infallible because it is the word of God, delivered by his messenger. For this reason, they believe there is no need for other sources of authority as the Qur’an has all the required details needed for a Muslim to live a good life.

However, other Muslims disagree with the statement because there are other sources of authority that are equally as important, examples include the hadith, sunnats of the prophet and most importantly the Shariah Law. These contain extra guidance on how to live a good life as a Muslim. For example, the sunnats of the prophet PBUH give examples to Muslims about how to life their lives in the best way possible and how to follow in his footsteps. Other authority's such as the Shariah Law teach Muslims about how to deal with criminals in an Islamic way.

Another reason some Muslims agree with this statement is that they have free will to make their own choices, this allows them to choose which sources of authority they need to live a good religious life. Many Muslims choose the Qur’an as the only source of authority needed because it is the direct word of God, and no other sources of authority are greater than the word of God

However other Muslims like Shiahs believe in the twelve imams who are also infallible and perfect in their interpretations of the Quran and hadith. These twelve imams were religious leaders of the Shiahs, this may suggest that apart from the Quran other sources of authority are needed as the Qur’an does not explain everything clearly and not wrong interpretations may happen, which may result in punishment.

Another reason some Muslims disagree with this statement is that God sent down other books for a good reason, these books were sent to be used alongside the Qur’an and not just neglected. God gave Musa the Tawrat and said it contains “guidance and light.” the Zabur was given to Dawud “to David we gave the Psalms, ” and to Isa the Injil was given. These books should be used as they are also sent by God.

To conclude, i believe that Muslims need multiple sources of authority like hadith and the other holy books but the Qur’an is undoubtedly the most important source of authority and other authorities should be used alongside it.”

This is what I replied:

“Hi, I don’t do Islam (I do Christianity and Buddhism) so I will try to use general tips rather than focussing on the content of the course with this reply. This is a great answer! Well done!

I would probably give this answer a 10/12

WWW:
1. Your introduction shows your understanding of the question and tells the examiner that you know what you’re doing. This helps get them in a good mood!
2. You used relevant subject-specific terminology (e.g. infallible, Hadith, Sunnah etc.)
3. You referred to different ideas within Islam (e.g. your mention of Shiah beliefs)
4. You used some quotes/teaching

EBI:
1. Include your own opinion in the essay. This helps to show that you can evaluate the arguments you put forward throughout the essay. This can be done by simply adding a final sentence of “I agree/disagree with this statement” - This is important because in order to achieve the top marks (11 and 12 out of 12), you must evaluate in the main body of your essay as well as the conclusion.
2. Try to evaluate each of your paragraphs immediately after writing them. For example, after your first point (Quran is the only authority and is infallible) you could add to the end of a paragraph “I believe that this argument is strong/flimsy because it ...” This shows that you can be critical of arguments. This helps to convince the examiner that you have really thought about your conclusion and hence reached a justified conclusion.
3. Try to include more teaching whenever they are relevant. I know that there are some topics where finding quotes is difficult and I clearly haven’t studied Islam in RS to be able to suggest any quotes but I do know that there are often quotes from other topics that can be applied to other topics. For example, in Christianity, a very common quote is “love thy neighbour”. Many students try to slot this in every essay because it is fairly open ended. If you are able to apply more quotes/teachings, you can illustrate that you’re understanding of the religion is secure.

As for your questions;

1. When writing a 12 marker for Homework, I tend to do 1 intro, 1 in support of the statement, 1 against, 1 for, 1 against and conclusion. In timed essays (e.g. 25 minutes to answer a 1 marker, 2 marker, 4 marker, 5 marker and 12 marker), I tend to do intro, 1 in support, 1 against, 1 for and conclusion because I tend to run out of time. This seems to work pretty well for me but having 4 paragraphs is ideal. I don’t think you need 6 points since you’ll probably run out of time.
2. Yes, an introduction is vital. I would actually write one for all your answers (e.g. 4 markers, 5 markers and 12 markers) because they demonstrate to the examiner that your essay will be concise and focused on the question. Try to include your own line of argument that you will follow throughout the essay within your introduction.
3. Aim for at least 1 quote/teaching in each point. You have done this well in the last couple paragraphs (e.g. free will, Shiah Imams, other books).
4. I have found that the best way to split the time for each question in an exam is to spend a maximum of 15 minutes on the 12 marker. 10 is ideal so that you can go back and check the entire paper with the remaining 5 minutes. You should only spend 25 minutes per question anyways and since a 12 marker is half of all available marks, it makes sense to dedicate half the time to it.
5. I would try to beef up some of the main paragraphs. Currently, your introduction is as long, if not longer than your main paragraphs. Ideally, you the introduction should be short and sweet. All you need is to define something in the question and provide your own opinion. It could be as short as: “The Quran is the holy book given to the Prophet Muhmammad PBUH by an angel. The Quran guides and informs Muslims across the world. I (dis)agree with this statement” Keeping it short will allow you to focus more on the main body of your essay.

In summary, this is a brilliant answer which only needs some small refinements to achieve full marks! Good luck!”




As for your question, my structure would be:

Intro:

The 4 sights were the things that Siddharta Gautama saw on his first trip outside of the palace. The 4 sights began to show SG about the true nature of reality and gave rise to Buddhism. I disagree with this statement

Agreeing with the statement:
1. The 4 sights sparked Buddhism. If it wasn’t for these, The Buddha wouldn’t have seeks out the ascetic life and realised that there was a middle way - link to story of sitar string and middle way
2. The 4 sights showed SG that suffering exists. This is the first of the 4 noble truths (Dukkha). If SG hadn’t realised Dukkha, he wouldn’t have found magga which shows the path to end suffering. Therefore, if it wasn’t for the 4 sights, TB wouldn’t have found the solution to suffering. Thus, his life would have been futile

Disagree:
1. The 3 refuges/jewels are there for a reason. The Dhamma (TB’s teachings) don’t only comprise of the 4 sights. Instead, all of TB’s teachings must be seen as equally important to reach nirvana.
2. If anything, the four noble truths, and magga in particular, is the most important since that offered the only way to end suffering. The various other teachings, simply lead to Magga. Therefore, Magga is the most important teaching. Since “I teach one thing and one thing only, Dukkha and the cessation of Dukkha”, it makes sense to assume that the most important teachings are the 4 noble truths, not the 4 sights since Dukkha is the first noble truth, and the cessation of Dukkha is magga.

Conclusion:
I am throughly convinced that the 4 noble truths are actually not the most important teachings as all parts of the Dhamma are equally as important.
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maisies0133
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(Original post by AI073)
Hi,

I answered a question about RS and gave some general tips. You should take a look at those (see below).

This is from the original poster:

“I'm revising paper 1 Islam, and i did a 12 marker as practise.
I need someone to mark it, any response is greatly appreicated (even feedback on 1 paragraph). What mark would you give me?
I also have a few question:
For a 12 marker, do you do 4 PEEL paragraphs or 6 (with a conclusion)?
Do you need a introduction/
How many quotes should you include?
How long should it be (with normal handwiring on A4)?
Most importantly in this question what parts should I remove/expand

This is the question and answer:

‘The Qur’an is the only authority a Muslim need in life.’

Evaluate this statement. In your answer you should:

• refer to Muslim teaching

• give reasoned arguments to support this statement

• give reasoned arguments to support a different point of view

• reach a justified conclusion.

[12marks] [SPAG 3 marks]



The Qur’an is a source of guidance and authority sent to this world through the last prophet, it was revealed to the prophet Muhammad PBUH by an angel over the course of 23 years (this number is disputed.) As it was revealed to the prophet, he would reveal it to the public shortly after. The Quran contains information for Muslims on how to live their life, it contains information on situations that involve everything from marriage to crimes and financial situations. These guide Muslims towards doing everything in a permissible way.

Some Muslims agree that the Qur’an is the only source of authority they need in life. This is because it is an infallible source, meaning it is completely correct without error. They believe it is infallible because it is the word of God, delivered by his messenger. For this reason, they believe there is no need for other sources of authority as the Qur’an has all the required details needed for a Muslim to live a good life.

However, other Muslims disagree with the statement because there are other sources of authority that are equally as important, examples include the hadith, sunnats of the prophet and most importantly the Shariah Law. These contain extra guidance on how to live a good life as a Muslim. For example, the sunnats of the prophet PBUH give examples to Muslims about how to life their lives in the best way possible and how to follow in his footsteps. Other authority's such as the Shariah Law teach Muslims about how to deal with criminals in an Islamic way.

Another reason some Muslims agree with this statement is that they have free will to make their own choices, this allows them to choose which sources of authority they need to live a good religious life. Many Muslims choose the Qur’an as the only source of authority needed because it is the direct word of God, and no other sources of authority are greater than the word of God

However other Muslims like Shiahs believe in the twelve imams who are also infallible and perfect in their interpretations of the Quran and hadith. These twelve imams were religious leaders of the Shiahs, this may suggest that apart from the Quran other sources of authority are needed as the Qur’an does not explain everything clearly and not wrong interpretations may happen, which may result in punishment.

Another reason some Muslims disagree with this statement is that God sent down other books for a good reason, these books were sent to be used alongside the Qur’an and not just neglected. God gave Musa the Tawrat and said it contains “guidance and light.” the Zabur was given to Dawud “to David we gave the Psalms, ” and to Isa the Injil was given. These books should be used as they are also sent by God.

To conclude, i believe that Muslims need multiple sources of authority like hadith and the other holy books but the Qur’an is undoubtedly the most important source of authority and other authorities should be used alongside it.”

This is what I replied:

“Hi, I don’t do Islam (I do Christianity and Buddhism) so I will try to use general tips rather than focussing on the content of the course with this reply. This is a great answer! Well done!

I would probably give this answer a 10/12

WWW:
1. Your introduction shows your understanding of the question and tells the examiner that you know what you’re doing. This helps get them in a good mood!
2. You used relevant subject-specific terminology (e.g. infallible, Hadith, Sunnah etc.)
3. You referred to different ideas within Islam (e.g. your mention of Shiah beliefs)
4. You used some quotes/teaching

EBI:
1. Include your own opinion in the essay. This helps to show that you can evaluate the arguments you put forward throughout the essay. This can be done by simply adding a final sentence of “I agree/disagree with this statement” - This is important because in order to achieve the top marks (11 and 12 out of 12), you must evaluate in the main body of your essay as well as the conclusion.
2. Try to evaluate each of your paragraphs immediately after writing them. For example, after your first point (Quran is the only authority and is infallible) you could add to the end of a paragraph “I believe that this argument is strong/flimsy because it ...” This shows that you can be critical of arguments. This helps to convince the examiner that you have really thought about your conclusion and hence reached a justified conclusion.
3. Try to include more teaching whenever they are relevant. I know that there are some topics where finding quotes is difficult and I clearly haven’t studied Islam in RS to be able to suggest any quotes but I do know that there are often quotes from other topics that can be applied to other topics. For example, in Christianity, a very common quote is “love thy neighbour”. Many students try to slot this in every essay because it is fairly open ended. If you are able to apply more quotes/teachings, you can illustrate that you’re understanding of the religion is secure.

As for your questions;

1. When writing a 12 marker for Homework, I tend to do 1 intro, 1 in support of the statement, 1 against, 1 for, 1 against and conclusion. In timed essays (e.g. 25 minutes to answer a 1 marker, 2 marker, 4 marker, 5 marker and 12 marker), I tend to do intro, 1 in support, 1 against, 1 for and conclusion because I tend to run out of time. This seems to work pretty well for me but having 4 paragraphs is ideal. I don’t think you need 6 points since you’ll probably run out of time.
2. Yes, an introduction is vital. I would actually write one for all your answers (e.g. 4 markers, 5 markers and 12 markers) because they demonstrate to the examiner that your essay will be concise and focused on the question. Try to include your own line of argument that you will follow throughout the essay within your introduction.
3. Aim for at least 1 quote/teaching in each point. You have done this well in the last couple paragraphs (e.g. free will, Shiah Imams, other books).
4. I have found that the best way to split the time for each question in an exam is to spend a maximum of 15 minutes on the 12 marker. 10 is ideal so that you can go back and check the entire paper with the remaining 5 minutes. You should only spend 25 minutes per question anyways and since a 12 marker is half of all available marks, it makes sense to dedicate half the time to it.
5. I would try to beef up some of the main paragraphs. Currently, your introduction is as long, if not longer than your main paragraphs. Ideally, you the introduction should be short and sweet. All you need is to define something in the question and provide your own opinion. It could be as short as: “The Quran is the holy book given to the Prophet Muhmammad PBUH by an angel. The Quran guides and informs Muslims across the world. I (dis)agree with this statement” Keeping it short will allow you to focus more on the main body of your essay.

In summary, this is a brilliant answer which only needs some small refinements to achieve full marks! Good luck!”




As for your question, my structure would be:

Intro:

The 4 sights were the things that Siddharta Gautama saw on his first trip outside of the palace. The 4 sights began to show SG about the true nature of reality and gave rise to Buddhism. I disagree with this statement

Agreeing with the statement:
1. The 4 sights sparked Buddhism. If it wasn’t for these, The Buddha wouldn’t have seeks out the ascetic life and realised that there was a middle way - link to story of sitar string and middle way
2. The 4 sights showed SG that suffering exists. This is the first of the 4 noble truths (Dukkha). If SG hadn’t realised Dukkha, he wouldn’t have found magga which shows the path to end suffering. Therefore, if it wasn’t for the 4 sights, TB wouldn’t have found the solution to suffering. Thus, his life would have been futile

Disagree:
1. The 3 refuges/jewels are there for a reason. The Dhamma (TB’s teachings) don’t only comprise of the 4 sights. Instead, all of TB’s teachings must be seen as equally important to reach nirvana.
2. If anything, the four noble truths, and magga in particular, is the most important since that offered the only way to end suffering. The various other teachings, simply lead to Magga. Therefore, Magga is the most important teaching. Since “I teach one thing and one thing only, Dukkha and the cessation of Dukkha”, it makes sense to assume that the most important teachings are the 4 noble truths, not the 4 sights since Dukkha is the first noble truth, and the cessation of Dukkha is magga.

Conclusion:
I am throughly convinced that the 4 noble truths are actually not the most important teachings as all parts of the Dhamma are equally as important.
Thank you so much for your answer!!! Im sorry to be a pain, but doesnt your responde answer the question of the most important teaching, and could i still use this answer even tho the questio is about the buddhas life? Tysm
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AI073
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Ah, right. Yes,

I think you could definitely use many points in the question about life. I would also add that the 3 watches of the night might have been the most important part of hi life because they are the culmination of the dhamma. I would argue that the most important part of his life was the moment when he realised Magga because it offers a solution to suffering. So I think you can use the same arguments but say "the time when TB ...".

Hope that helps and sorry for misreading the q!
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maisies0133
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(Original post by AI073)
Ah, right. Yes,

I think you could definitely use many points in the question about life. I would also add that the 3 watches of the night might have been the most important part of hi life because they are the culmination of the dhamma. I would argue that the most important part of his life was the moment when he realised Magga because it offers a solution to suffering. So I think you can use the same arguments but say "the time when TB ...".

Hope that helps and sorry for misreading the q!
Thank you so much!!!!!
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